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    Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    No Higher Rotavirus Risk for Adult Celiac Disease Patients

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.
    No Higher Rotavirus Risk for Adult Celiac Disease Patients - New study on Rotavirus and celiac disease
    Caption: New study on Rotavirus and celiac disease

    Celiac.com 09/03/2010 - Many patients who show up at hospitals and clinics with non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms have rotavirus infection

    A team of researchers recently studied a large cohort of adults with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints to see if people with celiac disease had any higher for rotavirus.



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    The research team included Mohammad Rostami-Nejad, BS, Kamran Rostami, MD,PhD, Maryam Sanaei, MSc, Seyed R. Mohebbi, PhD, David Al-Dulaimi, MD, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, MSc, Pekka Collin, MD, Chris J. Mulder, MD, PhD, Mohammad R. Zali, MD, FACG.

    They are associated variously with the Research Center of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases at Shaheed Beheshti University in Tehran, Iran; the School of Medicine of the University of Birmingham, UK, the Department of Gastroenterology at Alexander Hospital in Redditch, UK; the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital in Finland, and with the Department of Gastroenterology at VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    The team conducted the study at the Research Center of Gastroentrology and Liver Disease at Taleghani Hospital in Tehran, Iran.

    For their study, they randomly selected 5176 individuals living in Tehran, Iran between September 2006 and September 2007. Using a questionnaire, they found 670 case of GI symptoms, each of whom was invited for additional study, including stool sampling and blood tests.

    The researchers screened stool samples for rotavirus using amplification of specific gene (VP6), light microscopy and formalin-ether concentration methods. They also tested subjects for celiac disease including anti-transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies and total immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    The research team found the VP6 gene in 150 (22.3%) individuals. 22 subjects showed positive results for anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG-IgA) (95% CI 2.3-5.1), while three patients who were IgA deficient tested positive for the IgGtTG antibody.

    Eight of 25 patients (32%) showed amplification of VP6 gene, and positive blood screens for celiac disease, while 142 of 645 with negative celiac blood tests (22%) showed amplification of VP6 gene. They found no statistically important difference between the two groups (p=0.2).

    Unlike earlier studies in children, this adult study shows that rates of active rotavirus infection were about the same for adults who tested positive for tTG antibody as they were for adults who tested negative for tTG antibody. Based on this study, there is no higher rotavirus risk for adults with celiac disease.

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    Interesting article. The more we know about celiac disease and what to look out for in connection with it the better. Happy to read that there are no worries about having an increased possibility of rotavirus infections!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/28/2009 - According to the results of a new Swedish study,  patients with mild intestinal inflammation and gluten sensitivity face an elevated risk of death, even in the absence of symptoms severe enough to merit a clinical diagnosis of celiac disease.
    A number of studies have shown that people with gluten sensitivity and intestinal inflammation, but just how great is the risk? However, of those previous studies that show an increased risk of death associated with the disease, many were not population-based, lacked children and outpatients, while others were hampered by small numbers of participants.
    A team of Swedish researchers led by Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PhD, of Sweden's Örebro University Hospital, recently set out to conduct a large-scale, population-based study regarding mortality risk levels for people with celiac disease, and also for those with "gluten intolerance."
    Ludvigsson and colleagues examined histopathology data from tissue biopsies collected from 46,121 Swedish patients nationwide between July 1969 and February 2008. Of those patients, 29,096 had celiac disease, while 13,306 showed inflammation of the small intestine and 3,719 showed latent celiac disease, elevated blood antibodies used as markers for celiac disease, but no sign of gut inflammation or damage.
    The researchers compared the patient data to records of the Swedish Total Population Register to calculate mortality rates for the three groups of patients. They found that among the patients there were 3,049 deaths among those with celiac disease, 2,967 deaths for those with inflammation, and 183 deaths for patients with latent celiac disease.
    The overall risk was not great, mortality risk was 75% higher for patients with mild intestinal inflammation at a median follow-up of 7.2 years (95% CI 1.64 to 1.79), and 35% higher for patients with latent celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity, at median follow-up of 6.7 years (95% CI 1.14 to 1.58).
    The study also revealed that people diagnosed with celiac disease faced a 30% greater risk of death at a median follow-up of 8.8 years (95% CI 1.33 to 1.45). That means that over the 8.8 years following the study, 30% more people with celiac disease died compared to the control group.
    These findings confirm previous studies that show higher mortality rates in celiac patients. Major causes of death for people with celiac disease are cardiovascular disease and cancer.
    Still, overall mortality risk associated with celiac disease and intestinal inflammation for gluten intolerance was small, with just 2.9 additional deaths per 1,000 person-years for people with celiac disease, and 10.8 and 1.7 additional deaths per 1,000 person-years for people with inflammation and latent celiac disease, respectively.
    Of the population-based study, Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PhD, of Örebro University Hospital in Sweden, and colleagues writes,
    "we examined risk of death in celiac disease according to small-intestinal histopathology...Excess mortality was observed independent of histopathology, but absolute excess mortality risk was small, especially in children."
    In an accompanying editorial, Peter H. R. Green, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center, writes that the study's findings on patients with latent celiac disease, those patients who, in the United States, would be labeled as having "gluten sensitivity," were the most intriguing.
    Dr. Green writes that until recently, "gluten sensitivity has received little attention in the traditional medical literature, although there is increasing evidence for its presence in patients with various neurological disorders and psychiatric problems."
    Furthermore, researchers currently know little about the long-term consequences of mild gut inflammation. In such cases, patients typically show no sign of villous atrophy,  the flattening of the innermost membrane of the intestinal wall common to people with clinical celiac disease.
    Overall, the "risk of death among patients with celiac disease, inflammation, or latent celiac disease is modestly increased," the researchers concluded.
    The researchers speculate that the increase in mortality might result from chronic inflammation that damages patients' small intestines (the duodenum, specifically) or from malnutrition that saps their vitamins and energy.
    The researchers did not, however, rule out the possibility that mortality may be due to other existing conditions. They also cautioned that some patients with inflammation may have been misclassified as having latent celiac disease or partial villous atrophy, skewing mortality rates upward for the latent celiac disease group.
    Green concludes that the "study by Ludvigsson and colleagues reinforces the importance of celiac disease as a diagnosis that should be sought by physicians. It also suggests that more attention should be given to the lesser degrees of intestinal inflammation and gluten sensitivity."
    Source:
    JAMA. 2009;302(11):1171-1178.



    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/25/20010 - Women with celiac disease face greater risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the effects of treated and untreated maternal celiac disease on infant birthweight and preterm birth. Among their findings are that expectant mothers with celiac disease face a higher risk of underweight and early-term birth than those without celiac disease.
    The research team included A.S. Khashan, T.B. Henriksen, P.B. Mortensen, R. McNamee, F.P. McCarthy, M.G. Pedersen and L.C. Kenny. They are affiliated variously with the Anu Research Centre of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University College Cork at Cork University Maternity Hospital in Ireland, the Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit in the Department of Paediatrics at Aarhus University Hospital, the National Centre for Register-based Research at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and the Biostatistics Group, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
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    Source: Human Reproduction, doi:10.1093/humrep/dep409



    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/21/2014 - The presence of HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 is associated with an increased risk of celiac disease. In addition, nearly all children with celiac disease have serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG).
    A research team recently set out to determine the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease, by age and by halpotype, in children. The research team included Edwin Liu, M.D., Hye-Seung Lee, Ph.D., Carin A. Aronsson, M.Sc., William A. Hagopian, M.D., Ph.D., Sibylle Koletzko, M.D., Ph.D., Marian J. Rewers, M.D., M.P.H., George S. Eisenbarth, M.D., Ph.D., Polly J. Bingley, M.D., Ezio Bonifacio, Ph.D., Ville Simell, M.Sc., and Daniel Agardh, M.D., Ph.D. for the TEDDY Study Group.
    The team studied 6403 children with HLA haplotype DR3–DQ2 or DR4–DQ8 prospectively from birth in the United States, Finland, Germany, and Sweden. The study’s primary end point was the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, which the team defined as the presence of tTG antibodies on two consecutive tests at least 3 months apart. The secondary end point was the development of celiac disease itself, which they defined as either a diagnosis on biopsy or persistently high levels of tTG antibodies.
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    For children with a single DR3–DQ2 haplotype, rates of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 11% and 3%, respectively. For those with two copies (DR3–DQ2 homozygosity) rates of celiac disease autoimmunity and celiac disease by the age of 5 years were 26% and 11%, respectively.
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    Source:
    N Engl J Med 2014; 371:42-49July 3, 2014. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1313977


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