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    Jefferson Adams

    Numerous Autoimmune Diseases Associated with rs6822844 at the Il2-Il21 Region

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/26/2010 - Data increasingly supports an association between rs6822844 at the IL2-IL21 region and multiple autoimmune diseases in individuals of European descent. A number of autoimmune diseases share susceptibility genes, pointing to similar molecular mechanisms.

    A team of researchers recently set out to assess evidence for a general susceptibility locus by looking for association between rs6822844 at the Il2-Il21 region and numerous autoimmune diseases.



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    The research team included Amit K. Maiti, Xana Kim-Howard, Parvathi Viswanathan, Laura Guillén, Adriana Rojas-Villarraga, Harshal Deshmukh, Haner Direskeneli, Güher Saruhan-Direskeneli, Carlos Cañas, Gabriel J. Tobön, Amr H. Sawalha, Alejandra C. Cherñavsky, Juan-Manuel Anaya, and Swapan K. Nath

    Their joint effort was underwritten by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH - Grant Number: 5R01-AI-063622, P20-RR-020143), Colciencias (Grant Number: 2213-04-16484), Rosario University School of Medicine, and the Colombian Association of Rheumatology.

    The goal of the study was to replicate the association between rs6822844 and 6 different immune-mediated diseases in non-European populations, and to conduct disease-specific and overall meta-analyses using data from previously published studies.

    The team evaluated case-control associations between rs6822844 and celiac disease in subjects from Argentina; rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus in subjects from Colombia; and Behçet's disease in subjects from Turkey.

    They compared allele and gene distribution between cases and controls. They conducted meta-analyses using data from the present study and previous studies.

    The team found significant associations of rs6822844 with systemic lupus erythematosus (P = 0.008), type 1 diabetes mellitus (P = 0.014), rheumatoid arthritis (P = 0.019), and primary Sjögren's syndrome (P = 0.033) but not with Behçet's disease (P = 0.34) or celiac disease (P = 0.98).

    Cases and controls from Argentina and Colombia showed little evidence of population differentiation (FST = 0.01), which suggests that association was not influenced by population substructure.

    Disease-specific meta-analysis shows strong association for rheumatoid arthritis (Pmeta = 3.61 × 10-6), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) (Pmeta = 3.48 × 10-12), type 1 diabetes mellitus (Pmeta = 5.33 × 10-5), and celiac disease (Pmeta = 5.30 × 10-3).

    Total meta-analysis across all autoimmune diseases supports association with rs6822844 (23 data sets; Pmeta = 2.61 × 10-25, odds ratio 0.73, with 95% confidence interval 0.69-0.78).

    The team concludes that an association exists between rs6822844 and multiple autoimmune diseases in non-European populations. Meta-analysis provides strong confirmation for strong association across multiple autoimmune diseases in populations of both European and non-European ancestry.

    Arthritis & Rheumatism; Volume 62 Issue 2, Pages 323 - 329


    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123266977/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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