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    Scott Adams

    A Comparison of Diets with and without Oats in Adults with Celiac Disease - New England Journal of Medicine

    New England Journal of Medicine
    October 19, 1995 -- Volume 333, Number 16

    Celiac.com 10/25/1995 - According to an article published for the week of October 19, 1995 (Vol. 333, No. 16) in the New England Journal of Medicine, it is not a problem for celiacs to eat oats (non-contaminated, of course!). The article is based on a study conducted in Finland by a group of doctors who did very rigorous testing on adult celiacs and concluded that oats can, and should be included on the celiac diet (The lead doctor for the study is also a celiac).

    The following is a summary of the study: 52 celiacs in remission (on a gluten-free diet for more than a year) were given duodenal-biopsies, and then fed an average of 49.9 grams of oats per day for six months. They were again given biopsies, and none of the subjects were found to have any villi damage.

    There was also a group of 40 newly diagnosed celiacs who underwent the same procedures, except they were studied for 12 months rather than 6. The initial biopsies with this group showed significant villi damage due to the fact that they were still on a gluten-containing diet until they began the study. This group was fed an average of 46.6 grams of oats per day, and were given biopsies at 26 and 52 weeks. Their biopsies were almost normal at 26 weeks, which means their damaged villi were able to heal while eating oats daily. At the end of the year their biopsies showed no damage to their villi.

    The study DID NOT test people who had severe cases of celiac disease, and therefore cannot make recommendations with regard to them. Also, three people with dermatitis herpetiformis withdrew from the study because of an increase of itching, but none of them showed any signs of dermatitis. One person withdrew because of abdominal symptoms, but they did not exhibit damaged villi.

    Their conclusion: Our data suggest that most patients with celiac disease, whether in remission or newly diagnosed, can add moderate amounts of oats to their otherwise gluten-free diets without any harmful subjective side effects or laboratory abnormalities. Furthermore, among the newly diagnosed patients the improvement of mucosal architecture and the disappearance of mononuclear-cell infiltration were similar, regardless of the use of oats. -NEJM

    There is also an editorial from England which cites positive research which has been done there regarding oats. The NEJM is the Bible of medical research, with extensive peer reviews before publication.


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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Celiac.com 10/10/2000 - Dr. Hoffenberg and colleagues from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver report that the short-term consumption of commercially available oat cereal is safe for children with celiac disease new to a gluten-free diet. To determine this they studied 10 children with celiac disease who consumed 24 g of oat cereal per day, and examined small bowel histomorphology and antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer at baseline and at 6 months. According to Dr. Hoffenberg: Compared with start of study, at completion there was a significant decrease in biopsy score, intraepithelial count, antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer and number of symptoms.
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    Quaker oatmeal 0.006 %
    Safeway oatmeal 0.005 %
    Jane Lee oatmeal 0.026 %
    Soy flour 0.001 %
    Brown rice flour 0.000 %
    Pancake mix 0.000 %
    Cornmeal 0.000 %
    Rice flour 0.000 %
    Test was done with RIDASCREEN ELISA test for omega-gliadins. It detects wheat/barley/rye high molecular weight proteins but not oat avenin. The grain scientists tell us that even though oat proteins are different, they do have similar amino acid sequences to the toxic gliadin sequences. Similarly, in vitro (test tube) studies do show that oat proteins trigger the immune response of cells taken from celiac patients.
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    Scott Adams
    Gut. 2004 May;53(5):649-654
    A multi-center Swedish study involving eight separate pediatric clinics looked at 116 children with newly diagnosed celiac disease. The group was randomized into two groups, and one group was given a standard gluten-free diet, while the other was given a standard gluten-free diet that also included oats. The study period was one year, small bowel biopsies were performed at the beginning and end of the study, and serum IgA antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were monitored at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months. The median intake of oats for the oat-eating group was 15g per day.
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    "This is the first randomized double blind study showing that the addition of moderate amounts of oats to a gluten-free diet does not prevent clinical or small bowel mucosal healing, or humoral immunological downregulation in coeliac children. This is in accordance with the findings of studies in adult coeliacs and indicates that oats, added to the otherwise gluten-free diet, can be accepted and tolerated by the majority of children with celiac disease."

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/30/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology shows that patients with celiac disease can consume oats with no risk of adverse immunological effects.
    An international research team made up of doctors Tarja Kemppainen (1); Esko Janatuinen (2); Kati Holm (3); Veli-Matti Kosma (4); Markku Heikkinen (5); Markku Mäki (3); Kaija Laurila (3); Matti Uusitupa (1); Risto Julkunen (5), set out to evaluate local cellular immune response after 5 years of oat consumption by adult celiac patients.
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    22 of these patients already incorporated oats as part of their gluten-free diet. During the 5-year follow-up study, 10 patients who were concerned about the safety of long-term oat consumption stopped eating oats. The 12 remaining patients consumed oats for the whole 5-year period. The remaining 20 celiac patients formed the control group, and followed a strict, conventional, gluten-free diet that excluded oats.
    The team conducted biopsies and counted Intraepithelial CD3, TCR (IEL) and TCR (IEL) T cells to determine corresponding densities.
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    The results showed no differences in the densities of CD3, IEL and IEL T cells between the oat and the control groups. The researchers concluded that the mucosa of the small intestine show no immunological response in celiac patients who consume oats over a long period of time.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 42, Issue 1 2007 , pages 54 - 59

    Participating Institutions:
    Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Kuopio. Finland Department of General Medicine, Al Mafraq Hospital. Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital. Tampere. Finland Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Gastroenterological Unit, Department of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital. Finland About the Author: Jefferson Adams is a freelance health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

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