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    Oats Not Safe for Some People with Celiac Disease


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Loadmaster

    Celiac.com 12/01/2014 - For years, a debate has raged among researchers and among people with celiac disease about the safety of oats.


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    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--LoadmasterFor American researchers, gluten-free oats have generally been regarded as safe for people with celiac disease, and the decision about whether to include oats in a gluten-free diet has been left to the individual. In Australia, oats are not recommended for people with celiac disease.

    Now, that question looks to be answered, and it turns out, both sides are correct. Oats are generally safe for the vast majority of people with celiac disease. However, Australian researchers recently showed that oats do trigger an adverse immune response in some people with celiac disease. Moreover, they identified the key components in oats that trigger the reaction.

    The 10-year study, published this month in the Journal of Autoimmunity, showed that oats were well tolerated by most people with celiac disease, but that oat consumption triggered an immune response in eight per cent of the participants with celiac disease. The immune responses mirror those caused by eating barley.

    This is somewhat earth-shaking, in that it lends scientific credibility to the idea that some people with celiac disease cannot safely eat oats.

    Dr Jason Tye-Din, head of celiac research at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and a gastroenterologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, said the study reveals the role of oats in stimulating immune responses in people with celiac disease.

    The fact that the team was able to isolate the specific parts of oat that are toxic to some people with celiac disease should help researchers to develop accurate tests for oat toxicity, and to better tailor dietary treatment for people with the disease.

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    Guest Catherine Becker

    Posted

    I have always had problems with oats. Even as a child before I heard of celiac disease. When I work work in the oat or wheat fields, the next day I would be so sick. My stomach hurt and other things that I know are now are celiac disease related. I can,t eat oats to this day, even gluten free.

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    Guest Uncle Bruce

    Posted

    I'm in the 8%, and that was from a Bob's Red Mill gluten-free oatmeal. Now I stick with their Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal, with brown rice, corn, sorghum, and buckwheat.

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    I have always had problems with oats. Even as a child before I heard of celiac disease. When I work work in the oat or wheat fields, the next day I would be so sick. My stomach hurt and other things that I know are now are celiac disease related. I can,t eat oats to this day, even gluten free.

    I have a reaction when feeding wheat hay, mainly if the wind blows hay back on me or a cow gives a slice of hay a big shake and gets it on me.

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    Oatmeal porridge was breakfast in our house ever since I was born - it made me nauseous just to look at it so I managed to avoid it - but - there were oatmeal cookies which I loved - and got violently sick after - this was long before I was diagnosed - therefore - oat products have been off my diet despite many celiacs telling me they had no problems - thank you for clarifying the situation - I too am a member of the 8% club:)

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    Guest Kristin Jordan

    Posted

    I'm also one of the 8% of celiacs that can't tolerate any oats, and my trigger was also Bob's Red Mill gluten-free oatmeal, which I tried for the first time two years after I was diagnosed with celiac disease. It's difficult to be a no-oats celiac in the U.S., where many gluten-free products that do not contain oats share production lines with "gluten-free" oats. I had residual villous atrophy until I dropped all gluten-free products from Bob's Red Mill (not just oats) and Lundberg Rice (use oats as a cover crop).

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    New England Journal of Medicine
    October 19, 1995 -- Volume 333, Number 16
    Celiac.com 10/25/1995 - According to an article published for the week of October 19, 1995 (Vol. 333, No. 16) in the New England Journal of Medicine, it is not a problem for celiacs to eat oats (non-contaminated, of course!). The article is based on a study conducted in Finland by a group of doctors who did very rigorous testing on adult celiacs and concluded that oats can, and should be included on the celiac diet (The lead doctor for the study is also a celiac).
    The following is a summary of the study: 52 celiacs in remission (on a gluten-free diet for more than a year) were given duodenal-biopsies, and then fed an average of 49.9 grams of oats per day for six months. They were again given biopsies, and none of the subjects were found to have any villi damage.
    There was also a group of 40 newly diagnosed celiacs who underwent the same procedures, except they were studied for 12 months rather than 6. The initial biopsies with this group showed significant villi damage due to the fact that they were still on a gluten-containing diet until they began the study. This group was fed an average of 46.6 grams of oats per day, and were given biopsies at 26 and 52 weeks. Their biopsies were almost normal at 26 weeks, which means their damaged villi were able to heal while eating oats daily. At the end of the year their biopsies showed no damage to their villi.
    The study DID NOT test people who had severe cases of celiac disease, and therefore cannot make recommendations with regard to them. Also, three people with dermatitis herpetiformis withdrew from the study because of an increase of itching, but none of them showed any signs of dermatitis. One person withdrew because of abdominal symptoms, but they did not exhibit damaged villi.
    Their conclusion: Our data suggest that most patients with celiac disease, whether in remission or newly diagnosed, can add moderate amounts of oats to their otherwise gluten-free diets without any harmful subjective side effects or laboratory abnormalities. Furthermore, among the newly diagnosed patients the improvement of mucosal architecture and the disappearance of mononuclear-cell infiltration were similar, regardless of the use of oats. -NEJM
    There is also an editorial from England which cites positive research which has been done there regarding oats. The NEJM is the Bible of medical research, with extensive peer reviews before publication.

    Scott Adams
    CEL-PRO on Oats
    The following is an edited version of some of the opinions of the CEL-PRO, which is a group of doctors who regularly discuss issues concerning celiac disease. Disclaimer - this is NOT medical advise, it is a general discussion of the oats issue. See your own doctor for application to your particular situation.
    Doctor #1:
    I will start off the oats discussion by commenting that this is probably the single most comprehensive study of the effects of a grain on celiacs. The earlier evidence for oats as a deleterious agent in celiac disease was based on a very small number of patients or case studies. Reading the report in the NEJM this week would suggest that oats are safe for most uncomplicated celiacs. There are however some reservations about the study. Severe celiac disease was an exclusion, there were some drop outs in both the oats and the control groups and patients with complications were excluded. If the findings are general to the whole population of celiacs then it would certainly make life a lot easier.
    I have a concern about whether oat flour is reliably free of contamination with barley/ wheat. Also what would happen if we challenged a celiac with high doses of oat flour, greater than the 50g used in this study. Also would oat flour protein produce any of the subtle changes seen in the rectum with enema challenge.
    Doctor #2:
    Here in Finland [where the NEJM study was done] there are mixed feelings about oats. Our colleagues from Kuopio have done a very good study, and in fact the study is on-going. Five year follow-up results will tell us more, the authors are this autumn re-biopsing the coeliacs eating oats. Within our Celiac Disease Study Group we have discussed this, and we are going to discuss the item within the expert team of the Finnish Coeliac Society. At this point I want to say some words regarding children.
    Today we are not going to allow coeliac children to eat oats. We are first going to perform a study, our ethical committee has accepted our protocol. We are also going to look at minor jejunal changes in the normal mucosa revealed by immunohistochemistry. Again, the oats producer will provide us the oats for the study (same deep-frozen tested batch through the whole study). If no harm is seen, oats will be accepted also for children and this is important in our country, we by tradition consume oats. Then another story is whether all oat flour products at our market are clean. This is a real practical problem and we will study this. As you probably know, in Ireland the oats was contaminated, Dr. Conleth Feighery and colleagues used in their study oats from a German producer, tested not to be wheat contaminated (from the fields and mills). The Irish study pointed at the same direction as the Finnish one (9 adult coeliacs challenged with 50 g of oats for 3 months), oats was tolerated. The authors also looked for immunological activation in the mucosa, no changes were seen (paper presented at the 8th International Congress of Mucosal Immunology, San Diego, July 1995, abstract Srinivasan et al. Oats cereal is not immunogenic in coeliac disease. Clin Immunol Immunopathol 1995;76 (part 2):S72).
    Doctor #3:
    The results of Kuopio group published in NEJM are probably changing our dietary recommendations. [The author of #1] has recently discussed the situation in children. The study has been carried out in adults, and in adults the demand to change dietary recommendations is strong, as we have noticed during the last days.
    I think adult celiac patients can switch to oats containing diet under strict follow-up. The amount of oats tolerated, the long-term effect of oats, and the importance of gliadin contamination has to be investigated, however.
    I recommend to my celiac disease patients that they should undergo gastroscopic examination 1-2 years after starting oats-containing diet. Some antecedent information of the mucosal architecture should be available as well. If not, a duodenal biopsy should be taken even before starting of oats. By this way we also can observe possible minor inflammatory changes such as an increase in IEL or alpha-beta T-cell receptor bearing lymphocytes.
    If this arrangement sounds too laborious, at least a strict follow-up by physicians and dietitians are essential. The follow-up comprises general well-being, signs of malabsorption and EmA or AGA analysis.

    Scott Adams
    From an oral report by Dr. Murray; transcribed for the list by Ann Whelan, editor of the bi-monthly newsletter Gluten-Free Living. To subscribe, write to P.O. Box 105, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706. Dr. Joseph Murray, one of the leading USA physicians in the diagnosis of celiac disease (celiac disease) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Dr. Murray (murray.joseph@mayo.edu) of the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, is a gastroenterologist who specializes in treating Celiac disease:
    THE DAILY REPORT: The big story today from Finland is oats. There were two talks and several posters presented about the topic.
    In the first talk, Dr. Risto Julkunen spoke about the Finnish five-year follow-up study in which oats were given to a population of well-controlled celiacs. They ingested an average of 34 grams, which is slightly over one ounce, daily for up to five years. The oats used in the study were specially grown and tested to be free of wheat, barley and rye. The researchers claim there was no difference in those allowed the oats and those who were not.
    There was a second study presented from Dublin, and reported by Dr. Conleth Feighery. This 12-week study looked at a small group of patients with healed celiac disease to start with, who were given 50 grams of oats a day. Again, the oats were carefully screened and tested to make sure there was no contamination.
    After 12 weeks, no effect was seen on biopsy or through antibody tests. The researchers also took 2 of the 12 participants and did what they called a micro challenge of 500 milligrams of gluten a day. Both patients got reactions, so the researchers felt that at least two of the participants were sensitive celiacs -- and they still did not respond to the oats.
    A poster from Italy showed biopsies taken from celiacs that had been studied in the culture plate in the presence of oats, which did show some effect on the biopsies. In other words, tissue from biopsies from patients with treated celiac disease were put in a plate and grown in the presence of oat protein, and the oat protein had an effect on the biopsies.
    This sounded odd, so I made sure Id really understood what Joe reported and paraphrased: In other words, theyre seeing no reaction from oats within the body in some studies but this one showed a reaction outside the body? Yes, Joe said, this of course is puzzling. Continuing on the oats issue, a series of short studies from several places also showed what the Finns had shown in the body, i.e., no problem in the short term.
    This is Joes summary on Oats:
    Over the short term, in well-controlled, healed celiacs who are compliant in every other way, it may be safe for them to take oats that have been tested to be free of contamination of other grains. He also mentioned that there were a few studies showing that contamination of commercial oats may be common in several European countries.
    (NOTE: I went to Digestive Disease Week in May, where I met several Irish doctors who have studied oats. I would describe their strong beliefs about oats as very adamant. They are adamant in believing that uncontaminated oats are safe for people with Celiac Disease. If all of this oats talk pans out as being acceptably correct to gluten-sensitive individuals in this country, that would seem to be pretty good news. Then, the next big challenge would be to figure out how gluten-sensitive people are going to get access to contamination-free oats. I, for one, will be all ears.).

    Scott Adams
    The following is a post by Steve Martin (Lucaya@AOL.COM) who has a B.S. in Milling Science, and 10+ years of experience in real world milling, and another 7+ in grain moving and storage.
    I have been reading with some interest the discussion about oats and cross contamination. The grain storage/transporting infrastructure in the US virtually promises cross contamination of grains. Cleaning processes can separate grains with large size and shape differences. For instance, at the flourmill I use to work at, the wheat would come in with about 0.5% corn and soybeans mixed in, but because of the size difference, they were easy to remove. Oats and wheat, on the other hand, are close to the same size, and much more difficult to remove. I have not worked directly at an oat processing facility, and do not know how well they clean the grains before processing. Some mills I have worked at had the equipment to separate wheat and oats and some did not. I would think that oat mills would be the same. I do know that we will not eat any oat products.

    Scott Adams
    I am always amused by the argument that one grain or another is more likely to be contaminated than another, as I believe the real source of danger for contamination is found at mills and processing plants, and is more or less spread out equally for most gluten-free grains. Oats are often cited as having a higher chance of cross-contamination with wheat than other grains because it is often a rotational crop with wheat or barley, and kernels of these gluten-containing grains occasionally get mixed with the non-gluten grains. I do not understand why the same people who make this claim do no also include soy in this category, as it is one of the crops that is most commonly rotated with wheat.
    In any case, from the knowledge that I have gathered over the years about farming and processing grains, I must say that with most grains there is little likelihood of contamination due to the mixing of two different whole grains (i.e., the rotational crop hypothesis). This is due to the different sizes and shapes of different grains, and the machines which sort them after a harvest. If any grains do get mixed together the amount of actual contamination would likely be extremely low.
    In Trevor Pizzeys (Vice President of Operations for Can-Oat Milling) October 30, 1998 letter he expresses his belief that celiacs should avoid oats because he finds between 2.1 and 4.1 kernels of barley or wheat in every 4,000 (0.0525% and 0.1025% respectively). He says that this level can legally go up to a maximum level of 10 kernels per 4,000 (0.25%). In either of these scenarios we are talking about very low amounts. Even at these amounts the likelihood that a celiac eating these grains would eat 1 or 2 kernels of wheat or barley on a given day would be very, very low. Also, since most people who eat oatmeal tend to eat the whole oatmeal as a hot cereal, which means they can take very simple additional precautions to make their chances of eating any kernels of wheat or barley practically zero. The obvious way to do this is to look at the oats before you eat them or mill them and pull out any kernels that are of non-oat type.
    Now we turn to the other part of the argument to scare people away from grains that, taken by themselves, do not cause harm to people with celiac disease. This is the wheat dust in the mill (or during transport, or somewhere else) argument. There are many reasons, both health and safety, why mills take steps to keep dust levels down. Dust contamination is still possible, but I think we are also talking about even lower amounts that we were with the occasional kernel of wheat that pops up in oats, although there is no data that I know of to back this up. I think with whole oats (i.e., oatmeal) people can reduce any possible risk of wheat-dust contamination to almost zero by rinsing off their oats well with water before cooking or milling them.
    The famous oat study that was done in Finland and published in the NEJM used a source of non-contaminated oats to eliminate any possible factors that could ruin the results of their long and expensive study. It is possible that they could have used regular, uncontrolled Quaker oats for their study and gotten the same results, but again, the reasons for not doing so were to eliminate any possible factors that might affect the results of their study. This is the scientific process, and it is important with any study to eliminate any possible factors which could affect the outcome of the study.
    Last, there is a danger of contamination which comes from unclean equipment at mills, and at processing plants. This danger is present with any gluten-free grain, bean, etc., that is milled using the same equipment as is used to mill a gluten-containing grain. In other words we cannot speak of only oats with regard to this issue, as rice flour, soy flour, etc., could be contaminated equally in this way. Aside from legislation to require cleaning between milling runs, those who are worried about this need to buy flours from mills which they have researched and found to be gluten-free, or ones that adequately clean their equipment between runs.
    I think contamination issues are real, but need to be put in perspective with regard to other, perhaps more important issues, like labeling laws and getting agreement between the major celiac organizations in this country with regard to which grains are safe.
    See Also:
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Dec. 1997 v97n12p1413(4). Do oats belong in a gluten-free diet? by Tricia Thompson.

    Scott Adams
    J Pediatr 2000;137:356-366
    Celiac.com 10/10/2000 - Dr. Hoffenberg and colleagues from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver report that the short-term consumption of commercially available oat cereal is safe for children with celiac disease new to a gluten-free diet. To determine this they studied 10 children with celiac disease who consumed 24 g of oat cereal per day, and examined small bowel histomorphology and antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer at baseline and at 6 months. According to Dr. Hoffenberg: Compared with start of study, at completion there was a significant decrease in biopsy score, intraepithelial count, antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer and number of symptoms.
    They reported the gluten content of several substances:
    Study oatmeal (%, range) average of 4 samples 0.009 (0.003-0.014)
    Irish Oatmeal 0.006 %
    Quaker oatmeal 0.006 %
    Safeway oatmeal 0.005 %
    Jane Lee oatmeal 0.026 %
    Soy flour 0.001 %
    Brown rice flour 0.000 %
    Pancake mix 0.000 %
    Cornmeal 0.000 %
    Rice flour 0.000 %
    Test was done with RIDASCREEN ELISA test for omega-gliadins. It detects wheat/barley/rye high molecular weight proteins but not oat avenin. The grain scientists tell us that even though oat proteins are different, they do have similar amino acid sequences to the toxic gliadin sequences. Similarly, in vitro (test tube) studies do show that oat proteins trigger the immune response of cells taken from celiac patients.
    The team emphasized, however, that the long-term effects of oat cereal added to a gluten-free diet in children with celiac disease still need to be determined.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - After conducting an extensive review of the medical literature concerning the safety of oats for people with celiac disease, the American Dietetic Association recently concluded that even though oats are not yet endorsed as safe for people with celiac disease by doctors and support groups in the USA, they should, however, be safe for celiacs who choose to consume them if they limit their consumption to amounts found to be safe in several studies (approximately one-half cup of dry whole-grain rolled oats per day). Ideally, they also should be advised to consume only those products tested and found to be free of contamination. If this is not possible, patients should be counseled on steps they can take to help reduce their chances of consuming contaminated oat products (e.g., avoiding oats sold in bulk from bins, determining from manufacturers whether a dedicated line or facility is used for processing). In addition, patients should be advised to discuss any dietary changes with their physicians.
    The American Dietetic Associations conditional acceptance of oats as safe for people with celiac disease is another big step forward for celiacs in the USA.
    For more information see:
    Oats and the gluten-free diet
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association
    March 2003 - Volume 103 - Number 3


    Scott Adams
    Gut. 2004 May;53(5):649-654
    A multi-center Swedish study involving eight separate pediatric clinics looked at 116 children with newly diagnosed celiac disease. The group was randomized into two groups, and one group was given a standard gluten-free diet, while the other was given a standard gluten-free diet that also included oats. The study period was one year, small bowel biopsies were performed at the beginning and end of the study, and serum IgA antigliadin, antiendomysium, and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were monitored at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months. The median intake of oats for the oat-eating group was 15g per day.
    By the end of the study all patients were in clinical remission for celiac disease. Neither group differed significantly from one another with regard to serology markers or small bowel mucosal architecture (including numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes). Out of the original 116 children 93 finished the study, and significantly more younger patients withdrew from it than older patients.
    The researchers conclude:

    "This is the first randomized double blind study showing that the addition of moderate amounts of oats to a gluten-free diet does not prevent clinical or small bowel mucosal healing, or humoral immunological downregulation in coeliac children. This is in accordance with the findings of studies in adult coeliacs and indicates that oats, added to the otherwise gluten-free diet, can be accepted and tolerated by the majority of children with celiac disease."

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/30/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology shows that patients with celiac disease can consume oats with no risk of adverse immunological effects.
    An international research team made up of doctors Tarja Kemppainen (1); Esko Janatuinen (2); Kati Holm (3); Veli-Matti Kosma (4); Markku Heikkinen (5); Markku Mäki (3); Kaija Laurila (3); Matti Uusitupa (1); Risto Julkunen (5), set out to evaluate local cellular immune response after 5 years of oat consumption by adult celiac patients.
    The doctors looked at a group of 42 celiac patients who had previously participated in a 6-12 month oats intervention study.
    22 of these patients already incorporated oats as part of their gluten-free diet. During the 5-year follow-up study, 10 patients who were concerned about the safety of long-term oat consumption stopped eating oats. The 12 remaining patients consumed oats for the whole 5-year period. The remaining 20 celiac patients formed the control group, and followed a strict, conventional, gluten-free diet that excluded oats.
    The team conducted biopsies and counted Intraepithelial CD3, TCR (IEL) and TCR (IEL) T cells to determine corresponding densities.
    No Adverse Effects for Celiac Disease Patients Who Eat Oats
    The results showed no differences in the densities of CD3, IEL and IEL T cells between the oat and the control groups. The researchers concluded that the mucosa of the small intestine show no immunological response in celiac patients who consume oats over a long period of time.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 42, Issue 1 2007 , pages 54 - 59

    Participating Institutions:
    Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Kuopio. Finland Department of General Medicine, Al Mafraq Hospital. Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital. Tampere. Finland Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Gastroenterological Unit, Department of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital. Finland About the Author: Jefferson Adams is a freelance health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/29/2016 - Previous studies have shown that oat proteins trigger an adverse anti-33-mer monoclonal antibody reaction that is proportional to the immune responses in terms of T-cell proliferation.
    Although there has been some research regarding the impact of these varieties on the adaptive response, researchers still don't know very much about the role of the dendritic cells. A research team recently set out to characterize different oat fractions and to study their effect on dendritic cells from celiac patients.
    The research team included Isabel Comino, David Bernardo, Emmanuelle Bancel, María de Lourdes Moreno, Borja Sánchez, Francisco Barro, Tanja Šuligoj, Paul J. Ciclitira, Ángel Cebolla, Stella C. Knight, Gérard Branlard and Carolina Sousa.
    They are variously affiliated with the Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; the Gastroenterology Unit, Antigen Presentation Research Group, Imperial College London & St Mark′s Hospital, Harrow, United Kingdom; the Hospital Universitario de La Princesa and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, Spain; the INRA UMR-1095, Clermont-Ferrand, France; the Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Food Science and Technology Faculty, University of Vigo-Ourense Campus, Ourense, Spain; the Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (CSIC), Córdoba, Spain; the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, Gastroenterology, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom; and the Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain.
    The team first isolated protein fragments from oat grains and then analyzed them using SDS–PAGE. They then characterized several proteins in the prolamin fraction using immunological and proteomic tools, as well as Nano-LC-MS/MS. These proteins were very similar to α- and γ-gliadin, and showed reactive sequences to anti-33-mer antibody, indicating their potential for causing adverse immune reactions.
    Furthermore, the team found that some of the newly identified oat peptides triggered a range of immune responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, as compared with healthy controls.
    This is the first study to show that newly identified oat peptides can trigger a range of stimulatory responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, which highlights the potential of these oat peptides to trigger adverse immune responses in people with celiac disease.
    Source:
    Food & Nutrition Research eISSN 1654-661X

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/31/2016 - Oats are traditionally one of the more commonly contaminated gluten-free grains on the market.
    According to Gluten Free Watchdog, "gluten-free" foods made with oat ingredients are more commonly contaminated than foods made with other "gluten-free" grains. In light of their survey results, people with a high sensitivity to gluten might want to consider taking some extra steps to make sure their oats are truly gluten-free.
    The solution? Know your oats! To be sure that your oats are safe, Gluten Free Watchdog recommends following these easy extra steps:
    1) Make sure you are sourcing oats from a supplier of purity protocol oats, such as gluten-free Harvest, Avena, or Montana Gluten-Free. Currently, Gluten Free Watchdog does not recommend any of the commercial suppliers of mechanically and optically sorted oats, such as Grain Millers or LaCrosse Milling.
    2) Ask for test results. Regardless of where you source oats, ask your supplier to provide you with test results, including how frequently oats are tested and what assay is used for testing.
    3) Test the oats yourself. There is no such thing as too much testing. If you really want to be sure, you can send samples of oats to a third party lab for testing using the sandwich R5 ELISA and cocktail extraction. Labs include Bia Diagnostics and FARRP.
    Read more at Gluten Free Watchdog.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/03/2016 - As part of its mission, Gluten Free Watchdog performs gluten testing on gluten-free products and shares that information with the gluten-free community. They've tested many gluten-free products over the years, and collected data from their efforts.
    Over the past five years, Gluten Free Watchdog has been testing oat products labeled gluten-free that list oats as the first or second ingredient. In all, they've done professional testing on thirty-five different commercial products. They've recently released their findings, and while they don't name any names, they do offer some good general insight into gluten-contamination levels in general.
    All testing for Gluten Free Watchdog was conducted by Bia Diagnostics, LLC using the sandwich R5 ELISA (Ridascreen Gliadin R7001) and cocktail extraction—Mendez method.
    Based on testing data from Gluten Free Watchdog, oat products labeled gluten-free have an almost three times higher risk of gluten contamination as compared to labeled gluten-free foods as a whole. The results showed 28 of 35 or 80% of oat products testing below 5 parts per million of gluten, and 2 of 35 or 6% of oat products testing at or above 5 ppm but below 20 ppm of gluten. Meanwhile, 5 of 35 or 14% of oat products tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten.
    The good news, of course, is that 86% percent oat products tested below 20 parts per million of gluten, but that's not nearly as good as the 95% of all gluten-free foods tested to date that have tested below 20 ppm of gluten.
    So, the bad news is that the 14% of oat products testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten is nearly three times higher than for gluten-free foods in general.
    Main culprits testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten included "gluten-free" labeled oat breadcrumbs, rolled oats, granola, hot oat cereal, and granola.
    Gluten Free Watchdog's main recommendation for consumers is to know the source of the oats you are eating, and to make sure you're getting your oats form a safe and trustworthy source. If you have a concern, check with the manufacturer to make sure they source ALL oats from a supplier of purity protocol oats, such as gluten-free Harvest, Avena, Montana Gluten-Free.
    Read more at Gluten-free Watchdog.org.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.