Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Prague Looks for Consensus on Adolescent and Teen Celiac Disease Management

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com - 06/24/2016 - What are the main factors facing children with celiac disease as they transition into teenagers and young adults? There isn't much good data on the transition and transfer of care in adolescents and teens with celiac disease.

    Recently, a team of 17 physicians from 10 countries, and two representatives from patient organizations examined the literature on transition from childhood to adulthood in celiac disease. Their The Prague consensus report looks to shine some light on the best options for providing optimal transition into adult healthcare for patients with celiac disease.

    The research team included Jonas F Ludvigsson, Lars Agreus, Carolina Ciacci, Sheila E Crowe, Marilyn G Geller, Peter H R Green, Ivor Hill, A Pali Hungin, Sibylle Koletzko, Tunde Koltai, Knut E A Lundin, M Luisa Mearin, Joseph A Murray, Norelle Reilly, Marjorie M Walker, David S Sanders, Raanan Shamir, Riccardo Troncone, and Steffen Husby. See the numerous author affiliations below.

    For their study, the team searched Medline (Ovid) and EMBASE for a period covering 1900 and September 2015. To assess evidence in retrieved reports, they used the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation method.

    The current consensus report aims to help healthcare personnel manage celiac disease in the adolescent and young adult, and provide optimal care and transition into adult healthcare for patients with this disease. In adolescence, patients with celiac disease should gradually assume exclusive responsibility for their care, although parental support is still important. Patients should talk with their doctors about dietary adherence and consequences of non-adherence during transition and beyond.

    In most adolescents and young adults, routine small intestinal biopsy is not needed to reconfirm a childhood diagnosis of celiac disease based on European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) or North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) criteria, However, a biopsy may be considered where pediatric diagnostic criteria have not been fulfilled, such as, in a patient without biopsy at diagnosis, when additional endomysium antibody tests have not been performed to confirm 10-fold positivity of tissue transglutaminase antibodies, or when a no biopsy strategy has been adopted in an asymptomatic child.

    Source:

    The research team members are variously affiliated with the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, the Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, California, USA, the Celiac Disease Foundation, Los Angeles, California, USA, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, the Division of Gastroenterology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, the Primary Care and General Practice, School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, Stockton on Tees, UK, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Munich, Germany, with Hungary, representing the Association of European Coeliac Societies, (AOECS), with the Department of Gastroenterology and Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway, the Department of Paediatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Immunology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, Columbia University Medical Center-Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology, New York, New York, USA, Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, School of Medicine & Public Health, Newcastle, Australia Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital & University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, the Department of Medical Translational Sciences & European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food Induced Diseases, University Federico II, Naples, Italy, and the Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark.


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    This article is great since it addresses a huge need in a specific age population. Celiac disease is very difficult for everyone including myself. I am a nurse and a dietitian who did it all forever until I became physically disabled two years ago. I had to stop doing hospice care, teaching at 2 universities and close my gluten free store that I had since 1997. But where there is determination life goes on. I am not happy with a lot of things but I am not depressed. I help myself and others daily and so I am here to help anyone who needs it. Be well.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Psychosomatics 45:325-335, August 2004
    Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - Past studies have reported a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms in adults with celiac disease, perhaps due to serotonergic dysfunction, and an increased prevalence of depressive and disruptive behavioral disorders in adolescence with the disease, especially before treatment. In an effort to further study...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/15/2008 - For the first time, medical researchers have shown that an activation of the inflammatory response system accompanies major depression and that pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may trigger symptoms of depression. In the face of the study results, researchers are recommending that patients with depression be screened for leaky gut using...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/03/2011 - A number of studies show that people with celiac disease have higher risk of depression and death from external causes, but there are no conclusive studies on death from suicide.
    A research team set out to more deeply examine the risk of suicide in people with celiac disease. The team included J. F. Ludvigsson, C. Sellgren, B. Runeson, N. Långströ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - Digestive Disease Week 2016 took place in San Diego from May 21-24. Among the presentations given was one that stood out for its obvious health impacts. That presentation was given by Jonathan Cordova, DO, pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Chicago Medical Center. His presentation tied celiac disease to major depressive disorder in adolescents...

  • Forum Discussions

    Usually, we dip the corn tortillas in warm, watery, enchilada sauce in a small frying pan before filling and rolling.  It softens them and keeps them moist.  The rest of the sauce is added on top.     The tortillas need to be as fresh as poss...
    I do a similar salmon, but add about a tablespoon chopped fresh parsley and juice of half a lemon. Squish up and shape into bales. Roll in cracker crumbs (I use Shaar entertainment  or table crackers) and fry in a little Crisco oil. Very ...
    Thank all of you for your reply’s ..I forgot to mention we did cut out dairy as she found that was giving her problems . We will look at info both you gave and continue to do what we can to get her feeling better...thanks y’all very much for ...
×
×
  • Create New...