Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    Primary Biliary Liver Cirrhosis Linked to Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005; 21 (5): 515-518.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Celiac.com 06/08/2005 – Australian researchers searched Medline and other references for cases of celiac disease and liver disease from 1966 to 2003. They found six studies that reported liver biochemistry in 591 celiac disease patients—out of which a full 248 had abnormal results—the most common of which being elevated transaminases. In 115 of 130 patients with elevated transaminases a gluten-free diet returned the levels to normal.

    The researchers found a much greater association of primary biliary cirrhosis and advanced liver disease in those with celiac disease than expected, and conclude that abnormal liver biochemistry is frequent in untreated celiac disease—and those with it should undergo tissue transglutaminase screening for celiac disease—which could lead to a proper diagnosis in many cases. In rare cases celiac-induced hepatitis may progress to end-stage liver disease.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I was diagnosed with celiac in 2000, and in 2004 had surgery and my liver enzymes elevated. An ultrasound revealed fatty liver, but the enzymes have remained elevated, were going down, and now going back up again. I am seeking further testing and evaluation for possible cirrhosis.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Have not been "officially" diagnosed with Celiac, but am pretty sure I have it since every time I eat anything with gluten, I suffer incredible after-effects. Been on a mostly gluten-free diet for about 3-4 years, but occasionally fall off wagon and have some pizza or a cupcake, then my innards get all inflamed & sore & swollen again.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Nov 26th will mark the one year anniversary of the passing of my younger sister of liver cancer. Because I have had GI issues and was (I think) erroneously diagnosed as having moderate severe colitis, I am concerned that perhaps she also had celiac, but instead was also misdiagnosed and had her GB removed. She complained after the removal that she wasn't feeling better. So now my concerns for my own self are higher as I am finding that there is more to worry and be concerned about then just watching my diet. Thank you for all the articles and info this site has.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I have primary biliary cirrhosis, diagnosed in 2009. Then I got pregnant and all my liver test results were all so high including my bile acids which made me so very itchy. After having my little girl, it took 4 months for the Usro medication to start working and for the itch to stop. I have been in urso for 3 years now and been fine. I am now pregnant again and the itch has come back which I knew it was. My urso dose has increased from 1g a day to 3g a day, maximum dose I can be on. I just received a phone call from my consultant to say all my liver tests results have gone down to normal levels except the bile acids which have gone up. The doctor did seem quite surprised about the other going down as they didn't do that before. I told her I was on a gluten free diet and had been for 2 months now. I am amazed at the blood results going into normal levels as they have never been normal. But bile acids have increased but I know from experience and from going to a London hospital i who specialize in liver problems in pregnancy, that bile acids are related to hormone levels and of course pregnancy has increased these massively. So in understanding that gluten could have possibly lowered my other liver function tests they could not touch the bile acids if they are hugely affected by hormones, as I see it, gluten would not have any affect on hormones levels. So I am quite amazed and do believe the gluten free diet is helping me. It is a long term thing now, but am happy and very interested to see what my liver results are like in a years time and very interested to read articles like this.

     

    Thanks,

    Liz

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I have PBC, underwent a Liver transplant in Nov 2009, and I can't understand why my Doctors never once mentioned this to me? I had my Transplant at UCSF by Dr. Nancy Asher. This possibility was never discussed with me, and since then, my daughter who is now 30, has been diagnosed with an auto-immune disease, guess what that disease is called? celiac disease!!!!!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/16/2008 - A team of researchers recently set out to examine the connection between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis.
    The research team was made up of Alberto Rubio-Tapia, Ahmad S. Abdulkarim, Patricia K. Krause, S. Breanndan Moore, Joseph A. Murray, and Russell H. Wiesner.
    The team measured the rates of occurrence for tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGAs) and endomysial antibodies (EMAs) in end-stage autoimmune liver disease (ESALD). They then correlated autoantibodies and the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype. Finally, they assessed the effect of liver...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/03/2009 - A new study provides demonstrates that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased intestinal permeability are both associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
    Previous studies have suggested that bacteria from the intestine might play a role in NAFLD, which is the hepatic component of the Metabolic Syndrome. NAFLD can worsen to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and some experts have wondered if this progression might be promoted by liver exposure to gut bacteria.
    A team of researchers, led by Antonio Grieco of Rome, set out to answer this question by investigating gut permeability in patients with NAFLD...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/23/2014 - Transaminasemia develops through various pathways in patients with celiac disease. Currently, there is not much information on risk factors specifically attributable to celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine what factors contribute to hypertransaminasemia in patients with celiac disease. The research team included B. Zanini B, R. Baschè A., Ferraresi, M.G. Pigozzi, C. Ricci, F. Lanzarotto, V. Villanacci, and A. Lanzini.
    They analyzed data collected from consecutive patients referred from January 1997 through December 2009 to the celiac disease clinic at the Spedali Civili of Brescia, Italy. They ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/16/2015 - Researchers don't really have too much data on celiac disease in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis or idiopathic noncirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH).
    In India, a research team recently set out to look for celiac disease in patients with portal hypertension. The research team included Rakhi Maiwall, Ashish Goel, Anna B. Pulimood, Sudhir Babji, J. Sophia, Chaya Prasad, K. A. Balasubramanian, Banumathi Ramakrishna, Susy Kurian, G. and John Fletcher.
    For their study, the team enrolled 61 consecutive patients with portal hypertension having cryptogenic chronic liver disease, including 14 with NCIPH, along with...