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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Quaker Oats Launches Gluten-free Products

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Photo: CC--amber.kennedy

    Celiac.com 01/06/2016 - Quaker Oats is launching new, gluten-free versions of several products, including 18 oz. Quaker Quick 1-Minute Oats and Quaker Instant Oatmeal in both 10-count Original and 8-count Maple & Brown Sugar flavors. All Quaker Gluten Free Oats meet the 20 PPM standard set by the FDA.

    Photo: CC--amber.kennedyThe announcement is good news for fans of gluten-free foods, and great news for people with celiac disease who find oats to be a healthy part of a gluten-free diet.

    One thing to remember is that most people tolerate oats just fine, but if you’re not used to eating high fiber foods, you may want to start slow and see how your body adjusts to oats in your diet.

    Also, about 8-10% of people with celiac disease also seem to have a sensitivity to oats. If you are one of these people, oat products, even gluten-free, might not be right for you, so monitor the situation and do what’s right for you.

    For everyone else, gluten-free oats offer a great way to get healthy fiber into the diet, and Quaker’s ready availability makes that decision even easier.

    Are you excited about gluten-free Quaker Oats products? 


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    Of course we need to be careful about these. Quaker is using a "sorting process" - not oats produced to be gluten-free. As we have seen with Cheerios, this process seems to have some issues. Would be nice to hear how they are testing to be certain the level of gluten is less than 20 ppm.

     

    Please do not edit or change my post.

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    Of course we need to be careful about these. Quaker is using a "sorting process" - not oats produced to be gluten-free. As we have seen with Cheerios, this process seems to have some issues. Would be nice to hear how they are testing to be certain the level of gluten is less than 20 ppm.

     

    Please do not edit or change my post.

    Note that you are referring to an accident that happened at a plant that makes Cheerios, and then a voluntary recall that was conducted by GM after they discovered it--not to any incident where the detection of gluten over 20ppm has ever been found in any box of gluten-free Cheerios. To date, there hasn't been a single box that has tested over 20ppm.

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    General Mills was the first - but they discontinued due to spotty sales. Let's hope Quaker does better - but I trusted General Mills to do a good job - and I was disappointed when they discontinued the product.

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    Of course we need to be careful about these. Quaker is using a "sorting process" - not oats produced to be gluten-free. As we have seen with Cheerios, this process seems to have some issues. Would be nice to hear how they are testing to be certain the level of gluten is less than 20 ppm.

     

    Please do not edit or change my post.

    Please see the quote in the article: "All Quaker Gluten Free Oats meet the 20 PPM standard set by the FDA."

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    Note that you are referring to an accident that happened at a plant that makes Cheerios, and then a voluntary recall that was conducted by GM after they discovered it--not to any incident where the detection of gluten over 20ppm has ever been found in any box of gluten-free Cheerios. To date, there hasn't been a single box that has tested over 20ppm.

    Individual boxes of Cheerios were not tested. A large amount of boxes were combined and a sample from that was tested. The ppm was an average, which means there may have been boxes that had more than 20 ppm. There was no way of knowing.

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    I am one of the small percentage of celiacs that cannot eat oats. In fact, I was told don't even bother with an epi pen because if oats ever gets into my system again it will kill me and the epi pen won't help. I was diagnosed on 1-6-2012. I just hit the 4 year mark of battling the disease last week. None of the doctors told me to stay away from oats when I was diagnosed. I really wish they would have because eating them almost killed me. On April 28, 2012 I ate a gluten free oat bread sandwich. About thirty minutes later I felt a pain like a knife being jabbed straight down onto the top of my left shoulder. It knocked me to my knees. The pain raced all over my body after that and I went into full blown anaphylaxis. Oats digests into a very similar protein as wheat does. Gluten is the protein gliadin. Less than 1% of Celiacs have bodies that recognize oats just like it is gliadin or gluten, except it can cause anaphylaxis. I suffered the most horrific pain I have ever known for that entire day. By that evening I was having a hard time breathing. Around 11:30 I went into anaphylactic shock, I felt my chest get extremely tight, and I stopped breathing. I survived by the Grace of God as I cried out to Jesus just before my last breath. My doctors said I was the worst case of Celiac they had ever seen. I use to weigh 168 pounds and now I weigh 135 on a good week. I am 6 foot 1 and 37 years old. I am skin and bones and I have suffered incredible pain and misery. The villi in my small intestine are damaged and I now battle Cachexia also known as wasting syndrome. Not every Celiac is as severe as me, but please, please, please warn Celiacs to stay away from oats. It could save somebody's life. After fighting back for the last four years, I can say I am healthier now than I have ever been, but I will deal with the damage Celiac left me with for the rest of my life. I eat a lot of amazing food now and I'm not in pain anymore. I just can't gain weight because of the villi issue. I am just very thankful to be alive and I will never ever ever eat oats again.

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    Glad to see you mentioned that many celiac folks also have an auto-immune reaction to avedin (the protein in oats). However, it impossible to be absolutely sure one is not having autoimmune reactions without laboratory testing. Celiac disease is often call a silent disease because it is so hard to identify as the cause of a person's symptoms. Since Avedin is prompting the same reaction in 10% of celiacs, I do not see why we should think we will always know when we react to oats. Given the dangers of autoimmune disease, I choose not to eat oats at all.

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    Oh Yeah! I was so sad to see Chex Instant Oatmeal discontinued. It is nice to have a quick gluten-free breakfast for the kids sometimes. I hope this one is good. I am looking forward to trying it.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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