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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Quick Cranberry Coconut Cookies (Gluten-Free)

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Using a pre-made baking mix can often be hit or miss. Truly making them your own comes with the personal ingredients you add. Thick coconut shavings give these cookies phenomenal texture. The cranberries add a nice layer of sweetness that to try and have just one—even two—of these simple indulgences is near impossible.

    Ingredients:
    3 cups gluten-free baking mix (for these, I like Pamela’s brand)
    2 cups sugar
    1 cup melted butter
    2 tablespoons orange zest
    1 ½ teaspoon vanilla extract (check for gluten-free)
    1 ½ cups dried cranberries
    1 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1 egg
    Pinch of salt

    Directions:
    In a medium bowl, combine sugar, butter, orange zest, vanilla and egg.

    Slowly add sugar and butter mixture to a larger bowl with baking mix, cinnamon and salt. Gently stir until well-combined. Fold in cranberries and coconut flakes. Cover and refrigerate dough for 1 hour.

    Preheat over to 350° F and grease or line 2 baking sheets. Roll firmed dough into about 30 1-2-inch balls and align on sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes. Let cool before serving.


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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    I completely agree. It has to be healthy for me to even consider it.

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    I read an occasional article regarding wine and consume an occasional glass. This does not make me an alcoholic. I enjoy having an occasional non-processed, homemade cookie with butter. That does not mean I live on a different planet and/or disregard my health. It's called moderation, dear. Try it in your diet...and in your blog postings.

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    It's a recipe for cookies. Relax Susan.

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    IF YOU DONT LIKE IT, DONT MAKE IT SUSAN!

    Does being a celiac automatically mean you cant eat anything with sugar?

     

    Some of us like cookies!

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    I am thrilled to find this recipe! My 16 year old type 1 diabetic, celiac disease daughter just asked me if I would make her some cookies. Something she seldom "splurges" on. Looking forward in trying this out tonight. I will use half Splenda/ half sugar and let you know how they turn out.

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    I have to agree with Susan. While these cookies LOOK delicious, I can't justify the butter and sugar...I will, however, attempt to make it using applesauce or bananas for the butter and cut down on the sugar, and if that works, it will be considerably better for my heart.

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

    Posted

    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    Susan- The photo, not the recipe, comes from vegan baking. So, the cookies in the photo are likely vegan, but this recipe makes no such claim. Secondly, I think it's a bit disingenuous to criticize a cookie recipe if you don't like cookies, or baked goods or such. The recipe is for people who want to make a tasty gluten-free cookie. I think it should be weighed on those merits. Lastly, as for healthy eating, celiac.com offers many healthy recipes. If you look, I'm sure you will find recipes that work for you.

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    Maybe the people that think real butter is so bad for you and adhere to a low fat diet might benefit from going to westonaprice.org and read their articles on fat. It is pretty enlightening.

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    Guest Jefferson Adams

    Posted

    Maybe the people that think real butter is so bad for you and adhere to a low fat diet might benefit from going to westonaprice.org and read their articles on fat. It is pretty enlightening.

    Yes! Weston A. Price rules! I eat butter, cream, milk (all raw), eggs, and meat (all local, organic), and I'm trim and healthy! Nothing "lowfat" or "nonfat" or "diet" touches my lips...ever!

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    I have problems with this recipe on 2 counts--first HOW could it come from a source called "vegan baking" when it contains a cup of butter? Second, why when we develop celiac disease, do we give ourselves a free pass on healthy eating? On what planet would any average health-conscious adult make a recipe that's this bad for heart, weight, blood glucose levels?? I know it's decidedly hard to make healthy baked products that taste good without wheat flour, but what are we trading our gut problems in for when every posted sweet recipe is a heart attack on a plate?

    Susan; they are cookies for crying out loud, they are not supposed to be good for you and unless you are going to sit down and eat the whole batch you will survive 2 or 3 cookies I'm sure. Chew on a root if you want a low sugar snack.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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