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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Really Good Hummus Dip (Gluten-Free)

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/23/2016 - Good hummus makes the perfect dish for a potluck or barbecue. Cheap and easy to make, hummus is sure to please and quick to disappear. This recipe delivers a tasty hummus that is sure to be a big hit at your next food fest.

    Ingredients:

    • 2 (15-1/2 oz.) cans chickpeas, aka garbanzo beans
    • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
    • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, from 3 lemons
    • ¼ cup sesame tahini, well stirred
    • ¼ teaspoon cumin
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
    • Dash of paprika, as garnish (optional)

    Directions:
    Reserving the liquid from the can, strain the chick peas. Set a few chickpeas aside for garnish.

    In the bowl of a food processor fitted with metal blade, combine the chickpeas, ⅓ cup reserved canning liquid, lemon juice, tahini, garlic, cumin, salt and olive oil. Process for several minutes until smooth and creamy.

    The hummus should be smooth and creamy, but still hold its shape; stir in more liquid if it's too thick.

    Taste and add more lemon and seasoning if desired.

    Transfer mixture to a serving dish.

    Use a spoon to make a shallow well in the center.

    Drizzle olive oil in the well, and sprinkle with paprika.

    Serve at room temperature.


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    It's super weird that you are able to enjoy chickpeas as a celiac... It is common practice for chickpeas and wheat to be rotated crops so cross contamination happens in the field at times, and furthermore in storage. I haven't been able to find a single brand of chickpeas I can enjoy, despite rigorously cleaning them. My doctor initially suggested it may be a chickpea allergy, but after researching up the supply chain, I found information that suggests chickpeas are dangerous for celiacs.

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    It's super weird that you are able to enjoy chickpeas as a celiac... It is common practice for chickpeas and wheat to be rotated crops so cross contamination happens in the field at times, and furthermore in storage. I haven't been able to find a single brand of chickpeas I can enjoy, despite rigorously cleaning them. My doctor initially suggested it may be a chickpea allergy, but after researching up the supply chain, I found information that suggests chickpeas are dangerous for celiacs.

    They are gluten-free, but your doctor is likely correct--you could have an intolerance to them that is separate from your celiac disease.

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    It's super weird that you are able to enjoy chickpeas as a celiac... It is common practice for chickpeas and wheat to be rotated crops so cross contamination happens in the field at times, and furthermore in storage. I haven't been able to find a single brand of chickpeas I can enjoy, despite rigorously cleaning them. My doctor initially suggested it may be a chickpea allergy, but after researching up the supply chain, I found information that suggests chickpeas are dangerous for celiacs.

    My daughter has violent celiac disease. She is fine with chickpeas, hummus, falafel, etc. If you suspect cross-contamination, it is extremely easy to hand-separate any wheat berries from chickpeas, because they are look very different. I don't believe chickpeas absorb gluten from any wheat they may have contacted during processing. If you react after eating chickpeas that you have manually separated yourself, then the reaction is to chickpeas.

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    My daughter has violent celiac disease. She is fine with chickpeas, hummus, falafel, etc. If you suspect cross-contamination, it is extremely easy to hand-separate any wheat berries from chickpeas, because they are look very different. I don't believe chickpeas absorb gluten from any wheat they may have contacted during processing. If you react after eating chickpeas that you have manually separated yourself, then the reaction is to chickpeas.

    It is more likely she has an intolerance to chickpeas, as they are gluten-free.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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