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    Scott Adams

    Recurrent Brief Depression in Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The Journal of Psychosomatic Research
    Volume 55, Issue 6, Pages 573-574 (December 2003)

    Celiac.com 12/19/2003 - According to Italian researchers, brief but recurring bouts of depression and other mood disorders are significantly more common in those with celiac disease than those without the disorder. The researchers conducted a study that looked at 36 clinically diagnosed celiac disease patients and compared them to 144 healthy controls. The study found that those with celiac disease had "significantly elevated risks for major depressive disorders," including major depressive disorders, dysthymic disorders, adjustment disorders and panic disorders. The researchers suspect malabsorption of tryptophan, which can lead to a decrease in serotonin synthesis, as a cause for the elevated mood disorder risk. Another possible cause is the cytokines which are produced in immune reactions that may exert an effect on brain circuits related to mood regulation. More studies are necessary to determine the exact causes.


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    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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