Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Melissa Reed

    Restaurant: Gluten-Free Dining Experience

    Melissa Reed
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Photo: CC--zoetnet
    Caption: Photo: CC--zoetnet

    Celiac.com 07/24/2014 - People that have celiac disease know one of the main concerns is avoiding gluten when they have meals. Their second biggest concern is the possible co-mingling of ingredients that can contaminate otherwise gluten-free food! So how do you eat at restaurants when you have celiac and still have peace of mind?

    Photo: CC--zoetnetHere is how:

    1. Before you are to go out to a restaurant call ahead and ask for the manager, find out if they do offer gluten-free meals that are carefully prepared for people with food allergy (If you are unable to call ahead go online and look the restaurant up to see if they offer a gluten-free menu or gluten-free meal selections, if need be email them). Also ask if the restaurant prepares gluten-free meals in a separate area, and if the restaurant uses different cooking utensils for gluten-free meal preparation.
    2. When you arrive at the restaurant that you have confirmed has gluten-free meals, let your server know you have a "Gluten Allergy" (ok, you can use different terms, and this isn't correct, but it conveys necessity instead of trend) and must eat gluten-free. Ask for a gluten-free menu, if they did not offer one to you. If you feel comfortable ask to speak with the manager or chef at your table, so they know that you have a medical need for a gluten-free diet.
    3. Let your favorite restaurants know that you want gluten-free meal selections and a gluten-free menu if they do not offer that yet. Do not be afraid to ask! Also, online there are cards you can print out and take to restaurants that you can give to server, manager or chefs to let them know that you are in need of a gluten-free diet.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Some restaurants are now getting trained for gluten-free food preparation through National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Great Kitchens, so that all the staff is fully prepared and educated on how to handle safe preparation of meals for celiac and gluten intolerant individuals.

    Talk about peace of mind; if a restaurant has had the gluten-free food training, know you are safe to eat gluten-free meals there!

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I just found out the because of several autoimmune diseases that I have I can not eat gluten. I appreciate any help I can get. I just say gluten allergy because servers can be rude. I went to dinner called ahead and got a gluten free menu. The server asked if I just needed gluten free to lose weight. I teared up because I had to explain my illness in front of everyone.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter

    I just found out the because of several autoimmune diseases that I have I can not eat gluten. I appreciate any help I can get. I just say gluten allergy because servers can be rude. I went to dinner called ahead and got a gluten free menu. The server asked if I just needed gluten free to lose weight. I teared up because I had to explain my illness in front of everyone.

    That was rude of the server, but maybe he wanted to know so special care could be taken to avoid contamination. I don't explain other than to say I have a medical condition called celiac disease. It is nothing to be embarrassed about and the servers need to know to really take proper precautions.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Melissa Bess Reed has been living gluten-free after diagnosed with celiac disease in 1998, and Hashimoto Thyroiditis in 2012. Both autoimmune disorders require a gluten-free diet. Melissa is a Chef in California where the farm to table is popular cuisine. She has professional membership in ACF Chefs. She is a Certified Medical Assistant via an Associate of Science Degree. She graduated top of her class Alpha Beta Kappa, enjoys volunteering and is an advocate for awareness. Melissa has a Harvard Medical School CME Certification for Celiac Disease Gluten-Free Diet Education and a current TAMU Certification for Celiac Disease. Holds a Great Kitchens NFCA Gluten-Free FOH Training Certificate. Gluten-free cookbook author, food blogger and recipe developer. Owns a Gluten-free business.
    PHOTO CREDIT: Kelly Segre


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 05/20/2010 - The weather is getting warm and it's almost that time again-time to go camping! Camping is supposed to be relaxing and fun. Most people camp to escape the monotony of the daily rut, and to get back to the basics. Eating gluten-free while camping is really easy, once you know what to bring and what to avoid.
    Camping trips usually consist of the same easy to prepare foods. Chili, pasta, canned soups, hot chocolate, sandwiches, hot cereal, trail mix and  s'mores are the high-lights of most camping meals. All of those things can easily be prepared gluten-free. In fact, many gluten-free already prepared foods can be used for camping ...

    Jennifer Arrington
    Celiac.com 06/07/2010 - Traveling with celiac disease/gluten intolerance is a challenge and I suspect many of us would rather stay home than risk getting sick in a foreign country.  Well, our family had been planning and having to put off a trip to visit friends in the beautiful Abacos, Bahamas for three whole years.  And…finally the trip was only a week away when the fear of getting sick from other people’s food began to rob me of my excitement.
    We all know that food intolerances present multiple obstacles when it comes to travel.  The problem is that over the years my list of food intolerances has grown to embarrassing proportions.  Besides gluten ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/15/2013 - The website GlutenFreeTravelSite.com has named Pennsylvania as the most celiac-friendly destination in the world.
    Each year, the site chooses winners based on the highest number of positive reviews received over the previous twelve months. Previous winners include New York, Florida, Washington D.C. and California.
    According to the travel site, Pennsylvania won this year “due in large part to the many, many Philadelphia-area restaurants that have undergone training through the GREAT Kitchens program run by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness [NFCA]."
    Through its GREAT Kitchens program, the NFCA focuses on training r...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/02/2015 - Consider the real estate saying about: Location, location, location. Now, ask yourself how far would you go for a good gluten-free pizza?
    Or, alternatively, imagine yourself out in the middle nowhere, the middle of the pacific ocean, say, and ask yourself how over-the-top happy would you be to discover a floating bar serving cold beverages and wood-fired gluten-free pizzas?
    I'm guessing you would be very happy. You might even say you were on "Cloud 9." And, if you happened to be in Fiji, you would be correct.
    For Cloud 9 is the name for a bar and restaurant that floats off the west coast of the pacific island of Fiji...