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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Review Shines Light on Movement Disorders Related to Gluten Sensitivity

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      A recent medical review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet.


    Caption: Image: CC--Kim Bach

    Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy.

    The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. 

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. 

    Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity.

    To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. 

    This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet.

    Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.


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    1 hour ago, gunsandroses said:

    First time in over a year I have been able to reply. I bought a sea salt pepper garlic mix from someone pretty sure it wasn't Wegmens but McCormack can't find it now. WILL try that brand. Bought a box of Decaf Constant Comment yesterday said gluten-free but had weird and unwelcome dreams first time in years. Anyone find a decade tea with no side effects? I tried Bigalow (sp) Ginger lemon with probiotics but after a few boxes of s cup a night it gave me first bout of acid indigestion in 4 years since being diagnosed Celiac at 75. Judy wilson

    You might get a better response in Celiac.com’s forum section.  I drink Republic of Tea (variety of flavors).  It is certified gluten free.  I do drink black tea and use Lipton.  It is not certified, but many members drink it and have not reported getting exposed to gluten.  It might not be a gluten response (so hard to say), but an intolerance to the additives.  

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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