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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    A
    Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
    Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
    Atta Flour
    B
    Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
    Barley Hordeum vulgare
    Barley Malt
    Beer (most contain barley or wheat)
    Bleached Flour
    Bran
    Bread Flour
    Brewer's Yeast
    Brown Flour
    Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
    Bulgur Wheat
    C
    Cereal Binding
    Chilton
    Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
    Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Cookie Crumbs
    Cookie Dough
    Cookie Dough Pieces
    Couscous
    Criped Rice
    D
    Dinkle (Spelt)
    Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
    Durum wheat (Triticum durum)
    E
    Edible Coatings
    Edible Films
    Edible Starch
    Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
    Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
    Enriched Bleached Flour
    Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour
    Enriched Flour
    F
    Farik
    Farina
    Farina Graham
    Farro
    Filler
    Flour (normally this is wheat)
    Freekeh
    Frikeh
    Fu (dried wheat gluten)
    G
    Germ
    Graham Flour
    Granary Flour
    Groats (barley, wheat)
    H
    Hard Wheat
    Heeng
    Hing
    Hordeum Vulgare Extract
    Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    K
    Kamut (Pasta wheat)
    Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Kluski Pasta
    M
    Maida (Indian wheat flour)
    Malt
    Malted Barley Flour
    Malted Milk
    Malt Extract
    Malt Syrup
    Malt Flavoring
    Malt Vinegar
    Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Matza
    Matzah
    Matzo
    Matzo Semolina
    Meripro 711
    Mir
    N
    Nishasta
    O
    Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
    Orzo Pasta
    P
    Pasta
    Pearl Barley
    Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
    Perungayam
    Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
    Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)
    R
    Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
    Roux
    Rusk
    Rye
    S
    Seitan
    Semolina
    Semolina Triticum
    Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Small Spelt
    Spirits (Specific Types)
    Spelt (Triticum spelta)
    Sprouted Wheat or Barley
    Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Strong Flour
    Suet in Packets
    T
    Tabbouleh
    Tabouli
    Teriyaki Sauce
    Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
    Triticale X triticosecale
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
    U
    Udon (wheat noodles)
    Unbleached Flour
    V
    Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Vital Wheat Gluten
    W
    Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
    Wheat Amino Acids
    Wheat Bran Extract
    Wheat, Bulgur
    Wheat Durum Triticum
    Wheat Germ Extract
    Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Wheat Germ Oil
    Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
    Wheat Nuts
    Wheat Protein
    Wheat Starch
    Wheat Triticum aestivum
    Wheat Triticum Monococcum
    Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
    Whole-Meal Flour
    Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
    Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)
    The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:
    Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Artificial Color2 Baking Powder2 Clarifying Agents2 Coloring2 Dry Roasted Nuts2 Emulsifiers2 Enzymes2 Fat Replacer2 Gravy Cubes2 Ground Spices2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol2 Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch2 Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate2 Hydroxypropylated Starch2 Miso2 Natural Juices2 Non-dairy Creamer2 Pregelatinized Starch2 Protein Hydrolysates2 Seafood Analogs2 Seasonings2 Sirimi2 Soba Noodles2 Soy Sauce2 Soy Sauce Solids2 Sphingolipids2 Stabilizers2 Starch1, 2 Stock Cubes2 Suet2 Tocopherols2 Vegetable Broth2 Vegetable Gum2 Vegetable Protein2 Vegetable Starch2 Vitamins2 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free. 2) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 12/10/2000 - As reported in Ann Whelans September/October issue of Gluten-Free Living, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has released the 6th edition of its Manual of Clinical Dietetics, which offers revised guidelines for the treatment of celiac disease. This manual is currently used by hospitals and doctors all over North America, and represents the most up-to-date source of information with regard to the dietary treatment of various illnesses. The new standards set in this publication conform more closely with current international standards. Included on their safe list are items that have been on Celiac.coms safe list for over five years, including: amaranth, buckwheat, distilled vinegar (no matter what its source), distilled alcoholic beverages (including rum, gin, whiskey and vodka), millet, quinoa and teff.
    A team of American and Canadian dietitians wrote the new gluten-free guidelines, including: Shelley Case, RD, Mavis Molloy, RD, Marion Zarkadas, M.Sc.RD (all from Canada and all members of the Professional Advisory Board of the Canadian Celiac Association), and Cynthia Kupper, CRD, CDE (Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group and celiac). Additional findings of this team regarding buckwheat and quinoa contradict what has been accepted as common knowledge for years by some US support groups, mainly that these two grains are more likely to be contaminated by wheat than other grains. In fact, according to the team, buckwheat and quinoa are far less likely to be contaminated than most other grains.
    At the most basic level the new guidelines mean that celiacs do not need to avoid foods containing unidentified vinegar or distilled alcohol, this alone will allow much more freedom when shopping or eating out. Further, celiacs who drink alcohol will have much more freedom and a far greater choice when they want to have a drink. Additionally, celiacs will be able to more easily maintain a well-rounded and nutritious diet because they will have access to a far greater number of highly nutritious and safe grains.
    The ADAs 6th edition of the Manual of Clinical Dietetics represents the first time that Canadian and United States dietary guidelines have come together to create a united North American gluten-free standard, and will hopefully lead to the adoption of a single standard by all US support groups so that hundreds of thousands of celiacs will not have to unnecessarily exclude more foods than necessary. These new guidelines go a long way towards an international standard, which should be the ultimate goal for all celiacs and celiac organizations in the world.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 02/20/2015 (updated 12/31/2018- Here is Celiac.com's most up-to-date list of gluten-free beers and alcoholic beverages.
    The gluten status of the products listed below is accurate at the present time. However, as product formulations can change without notice, it is best to verify gluten-free product status by checking the ingredients yourself, or by contacting the manufacturer.
    Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are gluten-free. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.'
    Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid distilled beverages that use cereal grains in the manufacturing process, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.
    So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process.
    A List of Naturally Gluten-free Beers
    Anheuser-Busch Redbridge Bard's Gold Bard's Tale Beer Brasserie Dupont Forêt Libre Brasseurs Sans Gluten Glutenberg Blanche Brunehaut Bio Ambrée Brunehaut Blonde Bio Brunehaut Blanche Burning Brothers Brewing Coors Peak Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales: Tweason'ale Drummond Gluten Free Epic Brewing Company: Glutenator Ghostfish Brewery Glutenberg American Pale Ale Glutenberg Blonde Glutenberg Belgian Double Glutenberg India Pale Ale Glutenberg Rousse Green's Discovery Amber Ale Green's Endeavour Green's Enterprise Dry-Hopped Lager Green's India Pale Ale Green's Quest Tripel Blonde Ale Ground Breaker Corsa Rose Gold Ale Ground Breaker IPA No. 5 Ground Breaker Dark Ale Holidaily Brewing Company Ipswich Ale Brewery: Celia Saison Joseph James Brewing Fox Tail Lakefront New Grist Ginger Style Ale Lakefront New Grist Pilsner Style Minhas Lazy Mutt Gluten Free Mongozo Premium Pilsener New Planet Belgian Style Ale New Planet Blonde Ale New Planet Pale Ale New Planet Raspberry Ale New Planet Seclusion IPA New Planet Tread Lightly Session Ale Nickel Brook Gluten Free Nouvelle France La Messagère Nouvelle-France Messagère Aux Fruits Nouvelle-France Messagère Red Ale Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Lemon Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Premium Sprecher Brewing Company's Shakparo Ale Steadfast Beer gluten-free Blonde and Pale Ales Steadfast Beer Company's Oatmeal Cream Stout To Øl Reparationsbajer Gluten Free Whistler Forager A List of Gluten-Removed Beers
    Alley Kat Scona Gold Kölsch Brunehaut Bio Tripel Estrella Damm Daura Estrella Damm Daura Marzen Lammsbräu Glutenfrei Lager Beer Mikkeller American Dream Gluten Free Mikkeller Green Gold Gluten Free Mikkeller I Wish Gluten Free IPA Mikkeller Peter, Pale And Mary Gluten Free New Belgium Glutiny brand Golden and Pale Ales Short's Brewing Space Rock Stone Delicious IPA Sufferfest Brewing Company Pale Ale and Lager Widmer Omission Lager Widmer Omission IPA Widmer Omission Pale Ale Wold Top Against The Grain Wold Top Marmalade Porter Wold Top Scarborough Fair IPA Gluten-Free Hard Cider
    Most ciders are fermented from apples or other fruits. Most are safe, however, some add barley for enzymes and flavor. Read labels!
    Gluten-free hard cider brands include:
    Ace Ciders Angry Orchard Blue Mountain Cider Company Blackthorn Cider Bulmer's Hard Cider Crispin Cider (including Fox Barrel products) Gaymer Cider Company Harpoon Craft Cider J.K. Scrumpy's Organic Hard Cider Lazy Jack's Cider Magner's Cider Newton's Folly Hard Cider Original Sin Hard Cider Spire Mountain Draft Cider Strongbow Cider Stella Artois Apple and Pear Hard Cidre Woodchuck Woodpecker Cider Gluten-Free Wine
    All wines, including brandy, champagne, cognac, port wine, sherry, and vermouth are safe for celiacs.
    Gluten-Free Wine Coolers
    The majority of wine coolers are made from barley products. 
    Gluten-free versions include: 
    Bartle & Jaymes - all EXCEPT malt beverages Boones - all EXCEPT their malt beverages Other Gluten-Free Alcoholic Brews, Wines and Spirits Include
    Brandy Campari Champagne Cognac—made from grapes Cointreau Grappa Midori Prosecco Khalua Coffee Liquer Kirschwasser (cherry liqueur) Old Deadly Cider Sambuca Vermouth Gluten-Free Distilled Alcohols
    Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are free of gluten. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.'
    So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process.
    Gluten-Free Gin
    Most gins are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final distilled product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.
    Gluten-free gin brands include:
    Cold River Gin—distilled from potatoes Brands of standard gin include:
    Aviation American Gin Beefeater Bombay Bombay Sapphire Boodles British Gin Booth's Gin  Gordon's Leopolds Gin New Amsterdam Gin Seagram's Tanqueray Gluten-Free Rum
    Distilled from sugar cane, most rums are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Beware of pre-made drink mixes, such as those intended for piña coladas — many of these contain gluten ingredients as flavoring.
    Gluten-free rum brands include:
    Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Bacardi—only Gold, Superior, 151, and flavored Bayou Rum Bundaberg Rum Captain Morgan Rum Cruzan Rum Malibu Rum Mount Gay Rum Meyer's Rum Gluten-Free Sake
    Fermented with rice and Koji enzymes. The Koji enzymes are grown on Miso, which is usually made with barley. The two-product separation from barley, and the manufacturing process should make it safe for celiacs.
    Gluten-Free Tequila
    Made from the agave cactus, all tequilas are gluten-free and safe for celiacs.
    Gluten-free tequila brands include:
    1519 Tequila 1800 Tequila Cabo Wabo Cazadores Chimayo Don Julio El Jimador Herradura Hornitos Jose Cuervo Patron Sauza Gluten-Free Vodka
    Vodkas distilled from potatoes, gluten-free grains or other gluten-free ingredients contain no gluten ingredients and can be labeled as gluten-free.
    Gluten-free vodka brands include:
    Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito's, UV Grape Vodka—Bombora, Cooranbong Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson's, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac Rice Vodka—Kissui Sugar Cane—Downunder, DOT AU Vodkas distilled from cereal grains include:
    Many vodkas made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.
    Barley Vodka—Finlandia Grain Vodka—Absolwent, Blavod, Bowman's, Fleischmann's, Orloff, Polonaise, SKYY, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya,  Wheat Vodka—Absolut, Bong Spirit, Danzka, Grey Goose, Hangar One, Ketel One, P.i.n.k Vodka Rye Vodka—Belvedere, BiaÅ‚a Dama, Platinka, Sobieski, Starka, Wisent, Wyborowa, Xellent Swiss, Å»ubrówka Gluten-Free Whiskey
    Nearly all whiskeys are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid whiskey, while many others drink it with no adverse effects.
    Gluten-free whiskey brands include:
    Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum Whiskeys distilled from cereal grains include:
    Bourbon—Benjamin Prichard's, Booker's, Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam, Early Times, Ezra Brooks, Jefferson's Bourbon, Knob Creek, Makers Mark, Old Crow, Old Forester, Old Grand-Dad Canadian Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Black Velvet, Canadian Club, Crown Royal, Tenesse Whiskey—Jack Daniels, George Dickel. Irish Whiskey—Bushmills, Jameson, Kilbeggan, Redbreast, Tullamore Dew Japanese Blended Whiskey—Hibiki, Kakubin, Nikka,  Japanese Single Malt Whiskey—Hakushu, Yamazaki, Yoichi Rye Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Bulleitt Scotch Whiskey Blends—Ballentine's, Bell's, Black Grouse, Chivas Regal, Cutty Sark, Dewar's, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker, Teacher's, Whitehorse Scotch Whiskey Single Malts—Bowmore, Glenfiddich, Glen Grant, The Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, Highland Park, Knockando, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Macallan, Monkey Shoulder, Singleton, Talisker  Taiwanese Whiskey—Kavalan Classic Gluten-Free Drink Mixes
    Club Extra Dry Martini (corn & grape) Club Vodka Martini (corn & grape) Coco Casa and Coco Lopez Brands: Cream of Coconut Jose Cuervo Brand: Margarita Mix and All Jose Cuervo Blenders Master of Mixes Brand: Tom Collins, Whiskey Sour, Strawberry Daiquiri, Sweet & Sour Mixer, and Margarita Mix Mr. & Mrs. T—Except Bloody Mary Mix TGI Friday's Brand: On The Rocks, Long Island Ice Tea, Margarita, Mudslide, Pina Colada, and Strawberry Daiquiri. TGI Friday's Club Cocktails including: Gin Martini, Manhattan, Screwdriver, Vodka Martini, and Whiskey Sour mix. Other Gluten-free Beverages Mixes & Cooking Alcohol
    Club Tom Collins—made with corn Diamond Jims Bloody Mary Mystery Holland House - all EXCEPT Teriyaki Marinade and Smooth & Spicy Bloody Mary Mixes Mead—made from honey Mistico: Jose Cuervo Mistico—agave and cane Ouzo - made from grapes and anise Spice Islands - Cooking Wines - Burgundy, Sherry and White Also Godiva products contain gluten as do Smirnoff FMB's, Twisted V, and Smirnoff Ice.

    Megan Tichy Ph.D.
    What is Gluten?
    Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking).
    What is Alcohol?
    The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above.
    What are Amino Acids?
    The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity.
    What is Distillation?
    When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile.
    Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot.
    Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot.
    So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label.
    What is Vinegar?
    Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol.
    Why is Vinegar Still Questioned?
    The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence.
    Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?
    That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic:
    You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free?  What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.”

    Answers:
    Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them.
    Yes.
    3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten.
    3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility.
    3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.

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