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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    UNSAFE GLUTEN-FREE FOOD LIST (UNSAFE INGREDIENTS)


    admin


    • This list focuses on unsafe (forbidden) non-gluten-free foods and ingredients within the USA and Canada (last updated 10-24-2016)


    Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
    Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
    Atta Flour
    Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
    Barley Hordeum vulgare
    Barley Malt
    Beer (most contain barley or wheat)
    Bleached Flour
    Bran
    Bread Flour
    Brewer's Yeast
    Brown Flour
    Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
    Bulgur Wheat
    Cereal Binding
    Chilton
    Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
    Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Cookie Crumbs
    Cookie Dough
    Cookie Dough Pieces
    Couscous
    Criped Rice
    Dinkle (Spelt)
    Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
    Durum wheat (Triticum durum)
    Edible Coatings
    Edible Films
    Edible Starch
    Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
    Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
    Enriched Bleached Flour
    Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour
    Enriched Flour
    Farik
    Farina
    Farina Graham
    Farro
    Filler
    Flour (normally this is wheat)
    Freekeh
    Frikeh
    Fu (dried wheat gluten)
    Germ
    Graham Flour
    Granary Flour
    Groats (barley, wheat)
    Hard Wheat
    Heeng
    Hing
    Hordeum Vulgare Extract
    Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Kamut (Pasta wheat)
    Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)
    Kluski Pasta
    Maida (Indian wheat flour)
    Malt
    Malted Barley Flour
    Malted Milk
    Malt Extract
    Malt Syrup
    Malt Flavoring
    Malt Vinegar
    Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Matza
    Matzah
    Matzo
    Matzo Semolina
    Meripro 711
    Mir
    Nishasta
    Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
    Orzo Pasta
    Pasta
    Pearl Barley
    Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
    Perungayam
    Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
    Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)
    Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
    Roux
    Rusk
    Rye
    Seitan
    Semolina
    Semolina Triticum
    Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Small Spelt
    Spirits (Specific Types)
    Spelt (Triticum spelta)
    Sprouted Wheat or Barley
    Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Strong Flour
    Suet in Packets
    Tabbouleh
    Tabouli
    Teriyaki Sauce
    Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
    Triticale X triticosecale
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
    Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
    Udon (wheat noodles)
    Unbleached Flour
    Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
    Vital Wheat Gluten
    Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
    Wheat Amino Acids
    Wheat Bran Extract
    Wheat, Bulgur
    Wheat Durum Triticum
    Wheat Germ Extract
    Wheat Germ Glycerides
    Wheat Germ Oil
    Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
    Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
    Wheat Nuts
    Wheat Protein
    Wheat Triticum aestivum
    Wheat Triticum Monococcum
    Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
    Whole-Meal Flour
    Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
    Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

    The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:


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    Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein4
    Artificial Color4
    Baking Powder4
    Clarifying Agents4
    Coloring4
    Dry Roasted Nuts4
    Emulsifiers4
    Enzymes4
    Fat Replacer4
    Gravy Cubes4
    Ground Spices4
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten4
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein4
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol4
    Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch4
    Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate4
    Hydroxypropylated Starch4
    Miso4
    Natural Juices4
    Non-dairy Creamer4
    Pregelatinized Starch4
    Protein Hydrolysates4
    Seafood Analogs4
    Seasonings4
    Sirimi4
    Soba Noodles4
    Soy Sauce4
    Soy Sauce Solids4
    Sphingolipids4
    Stabilizers4
    Starch1, 4
    Stock Cubes4
    Suet4
    Tocopherols4
    Vegetable Broth4
    Vegetable Gum4
    Vegetable Protein4
    Vegetable Starch4
    Vitamins4
    Wheat Starch5

    • 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.
    • 4) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
    • 5) Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.

    Edited by admin



    Image Caption: Unsafe Foods
    0


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    Recommended Comments

    Guest margaret stroud

    Posted

    This list is so complete with footnotes! It opens the mystery of so many additives not fully explained by mere labels on compound foods found in the supermarkets.

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    Guest Sue Anderson

    Posted

    Keep them coming - I would love a grocery list that was gluten free. Seems like so many items offering advice is a booklet costing money. I can only do so much.

    Thank you for your info.

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    Guest Patricia Buchanan

    Posted

    A great article. A great reminder for me to be more careful with foods that do not say Gluten Free.

     

     

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    I have celiac and its hard to be on my diet. Because of where I live I can't find foods that I can eat. Most people and doctors don't know what celiac is or believe I have it. I would just like to say that this website brings me comfort. It proves to me that I'm not alone.

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    Guest Susan Patzke

    Posted

    Thanks, this is very helpful. Takes a lot of guess work out of it. Wondering why you didn't mention anything about whey?

     

    (Scott Adams) Whey is gluten-free and is a dairy product.

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    Guest Debra Darling

    Posted

    It is bad to eat the wrong things without knowing it. This list is great thank you.

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    This information is another useful tool in keeping one's diet gluten-free. Important information to have.

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    Guest Kate Poulson

    Posted

    I've not been 'diagnosed' with celiac, but do have an issue with a LOT of foods; wheat and grains being the worst for my health. I have, over the past 6 years or so, learned to not buy anything pre-made or processed. I make my own chocolate toppings, cocoa, and so on. When I come across articles like this, I am thankful I don't buy processed, prepackaged food (except vanilla ice cream, natural only). It sure takes longer to cook my own food from scratch, but my mental, emotional and physical health, as well as my relationships with my husband and kids, is so much better.

     

    Thank you for the information; keep up the good work.

     

    Blessings

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    Guest joanne coudriet

    Posted

    Excellent--I have not been diagnosed with celiac but I have tried to maintain a wheat free diet for 7 years and feel wonderful. Thanks for the great help--sometimes I cannot figure out what food has caused my distress. You gave me a lot of food for thought. Thanks.

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    Guest Kimberly

    Posted

    I'm undertaking a gluten-free diet to test its results on the excessive daytime sleepiness caused by my Narcolepsy. This list is very thorough and will help me sort through what's already in the pantry and products on the store shelves.

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    Guest Jennifer G

    Posted

    Thank goodness for this site! I was trying to figure out how to read the labels of products, and without this list I couldn't do it!! Thanks! :-)

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    Excellent inclusive list, I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease and this is very helpful

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    Guest Tammy DeBord

    Posted

    Really, really informative - the first place where I've found so much info on one page - especially in relation to the additives/preservatives in foods and the foods themselves. I appreciate it!!!

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    Guest Jerrell

    Posted

    Thank you so much for this! This is great info for our family. Much thanks!!!

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    Guest Shirley

    Posted

    I really appreciate the information given in this 'Unsafe' list with the footnotes so that I can understand why. It will help me to make sure my diet only contains gluten-free foods.

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    Wow! For someone new to this topic, it really takes the struggle out of cooking and preparing meals for those that have celiac disease! The things most helpful are the special holiday recipes, because everyone likes a special treat once in awhile!

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    I just found out I have celiac disease. This list has been extremely useful.

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    I was diagnosed with celiac in 1961 at Chicago Illinois Research. It is most helpful to have this type of information available. Thank you.

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    Guest nicolette

    Posted

    I was recently, and accidentally, told it's probable that I have asymptomatic celiac disease. With that heads up I now think my 22 month old has it. I was going crazy trying to figure out why she constantly has diarrhea. I'm trying a gluten-free diet and the results are fabulous. Firm stools for almost one week! This list will really assist me in my efforts to help my little girl. Thanks!

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    Guest Janine

    Posted

    The extremely specific information, with citations, is exceedingly helpful to this biomedical scientist who also has celiac disease. You are doing a real service; please keep it up!

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    Citrus Red No. 2
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    Cocoa Butter
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    Coconut Vinegar
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    Colloidal Silicon Dioxide
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    Copper Sulphate
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    Corn Gluten
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    Corn Meal
    Corn Flour
    Corn Starch
    Corn Sugar
    Corn Sugar Vinegar
    Corn Syrup
    Corn Syrup Solids
    Corn Swetener
    Corn Vinegar
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    Flaked Rice
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    Flavoring Extracts
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    Fruit (including dried)
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    Vanillin
    Vinegars (Specific Types - Except Malt Vinegar)
    Vitamin A (retinol)
    Vitamin A Palmitate
    Vitamin B1
    Vitamin B-12
    Vitamin B2
    Vitamin B6
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin E Acetate
    Waxy Maize
    Whey
    Whey Protein Concentrate
    Whey Protein Isolate
    White Vinegar
    Wines
    Wine Vinegars (& Balsamic)
    Wild Rice
    Xanthan Gum
    Xylitol
    Yam Flour
    Yeast (except brewer's yeast)
    Yogurt (plain, unflavored)
    Zinc Oxide
    Zinc Sulfate
    1) Cellulose is a carbohydrate polymer of D-glucose. It is the structural material of plants, such as wood in trees. It contains no gluten protein. 2) Methyl cellulose is a chemically modified form of cellulose that makes a good substitute for gluten in rice-based breads, etc. 3) Recent research indicates that oats may be safe for people on gluten-free diets, although many people may also have an additional, unrelated intolerance to them. Cross contamination with wheat is also a factor that you need to consider before choosing to include oats in your diet.

    admin

    Rice and soy beverages because their production process may utilize barley enzymes. Bad advice from health food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs). Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops). Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc. Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels. Toothpaste and mouthwash. Medicines: many contain gluten. Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-gluten-free ingredient. Some brands of rice paper. Sauce mixes and sauces (soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc.). Ice cream. Packet & canned soups. Dried meals and gravy mixes. Laxatives. Grilled restaurant food - gluten contaminated grill. Fried restaurant foods - gluten contaminated grease. Ground spices - wheat flour is sometimes used to prevent clumping.

    Megan Tichy

    What is Gluten?
    Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking).
    What is Alcohol?
    The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above.
    What are Amino Acids?
    The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity.
    What is Distillation?
    When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile.
    Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot.
    Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot.
    So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label.
    What is Vinegar?
    Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol.
    Why is Vinegar Still Questioned?
    The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence.
    Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?
    That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic:
    You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free?  What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.”

    Answers:
    Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them.
    Yes.
    3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten.
    3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility.
    3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.

  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764