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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Scientists Catch Culprit Oat Peptides That Trigger Celiac Immune Response

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/29/2016 - Previous studies have shown that oat proteins trigger an adverse anti-33-mer monoclonal antibody reaction that is proportional to the immune responses in terms of T-cell proliferation.

    Photo: CC--Pedro ReynaAlthough there has been some research regarding the impact of these varieties on the adaptive response, researchers still don't know very much about the role of the dendritic cells. A research team recently set out to characterize different oat fractions and to study their effect on dendritic cells from celiac patients.

    The research team included Isabel Comino, David Bernardo, Emmanuelle Bancel, María de Lourdes Moreno, Borja Sánchez, Francisco Barro, Tanja Šuligoj, Paul J. Ciclitira, Ángel Cebolla, Stella C. Knight, Gérard Branlard and Carolina Sousa.

    They are variously affiliated with the Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; the Gastroenterology Unit, Antigen Presentation Research Group, Imperial College London & St Mark′s Hospital, Harrow, United Kingdom; the Hospital Universitario de La Princesa and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, Spain; the INRA UMR-1095, Clermont-Ferrand, France; the Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Food Science and Technology Faculty, University of Vigo-Ourense Campus, Ourense, Spain; the Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (CSIC), Córdoba, Spain; the Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, Gastroenterology, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom; and the Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain.

    The team first isolated protein fragments from oat grains and then analyzed them using SDS–PAGE. They then characterized several proteins in the prolamin fraction using immunological and proteomic tools, as well as Nano-LC-MS/MS. These proteins were very similar to α- and γ-gliadin, and showed reactive sequences to anti-33-mer antibody, indicating their potential for causing adverse immune reactions.

    Furthermore, the team found that some of the newly identified oat peptides triggered a range of immune responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, as compared with healthy controls.

    This is the first study to show that newly identified oat peptides can trigger a range of stimulatory responses on circulating dendritic cells from celiac patients, which highlights the potential of these oat peptides to trigger adverse immune responses in people with celiac disease.

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    How about labeling them gluten free, but possibly causing a reaction in some people. I have a friend who reacted to everything that she ate for longer than a short period of time. Her family ate a huge variety of meats from the regular pork, beef, and chicken to moose, antelope and buffalo with arrowroot flour and other such things and this was over 50 years ago. From what I can see in the literature, the vast majority of celiacs who eat uncontaminated oats have little or no reaction. The important word in that sentence is "uncontaminated". In any industrial scale process, it is hard to believe that some tiny amount might not slip by. That does not mean that every effort should not be taken to make sure of the purity of oats used for various products. If a certain small percentage of celiacs also respond to pure oats, that is a separate issue. That issue should not be ignored and testing should be carried out to make sure that oat products claiming to be gluten free truly are.

     

    As a casual perusal of the many posts on this site will attest, there is a huge range of reactions to a variety of products within just the readers of this site. Attacking individuals for their particular reactions is not useful. People with different reactions from those portrayed in other posts should merely document "their" reactions and not generalize or assume that some other poster is incorrect. The science on most of this is unclear or unreliable, making it difficult for sufferers to make personal decisions other than by experiment. Even those who choose to be purely vegan or ovo-lacto-vegans are challenged by daily decisions when they are away from home. Extended travel as on vacations can prove to be almost impossible to manage properly.

    I am feeling my way, day by day, and hoping that I can survive the huge intrusion into my life that is represented by celiac disease. My thanks go out to all who participate in this site and those who manage the content.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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