Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    Screening for Celiac Disease Recommended During Pregnancy

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Gut 2000;46:332-335

    (Celiac.com 03/17/2000) In the latest issue of Gut, Italian researchers propose that celiac disease is more common than previously thought, and that pregnant women should be screened for celiac disease. They conclude that a screening could help women to avoid negative outcomes and miscarriages. Dr. L. Greco and his colleagues from the University of Naples Federico II screened blood samples from 845 pregnant women in an effort to determine the prevalence of celiac disease. They looked for elevated levels of endomysial antibodies against tissue transglutaminase to determine how many of them had celiac disease. Out of the 845, women 12 had celiac disease (1.4%), and only three of the 12 had been previously diagnosed and were not following a gluten-free diet. The other nine women underwent a small intestinal biopsy to confirm their diagnosis. Out of the 12 diagnosed women, seven had either a pre-term delivery, or their babies were smaller than normal. Out of the remaining five women, four had had at least one miscarriage. Three of the babies died.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    When following up with 11 of the women, eight had another pregnancy and seven of them had reached term at the time of publication. Out of the eight women, five followed a gluten-free diet, and six of their babies turned out healthy. According to the researchers: Coeliac disease is considerably more common than most of the diseases for which pregnant women are routinely screened. The authors conclude: Consideration should be given to screening for coeliac disease in pregnancy, because of the high incidence of avoidable outcomes and the chance of reversibility through consumption of a gluten-free diet.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/11/2009 - When is a beer not a beer? When it's gluten-free. Until now.
    Beer perpetually hovers near the top of most celiac lists of things they'd love to have if they could. Until recently, the regulation of labels for beer, wine and spirits fell to a little known government agency called the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.
    Because their regulations relied on the Federal Alcohol Administration Act of 1935, which defined beer as a beverage brewed from malted barley and other grains, gluten-free beers did not meet the strict definition, and could not therefore be labeled as 'gluten-free beer,' as no such standard existed....

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/16/2013 - Research suggests that many people with autism are sensitive to gluten, and plenty of people turn to gluten-free diets to help their autistic children.
    But for Real Housewives of New Jersey star Jacqueline Laurita, a gluten-free diet is just the start. She's trying anything and everything to help their autistic three-year-old son Nicholas, including some pretty high-tech therapies.
    Jacqueline spends a great deal of her time researching her son’s condition, and finding new therapies to help his development.
    Laurita is currently trying a gluten- and casein-free (Gluten-free Casein-free) diet, and she’s even trying out a h...

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 10/09/2013 - This article originally appeared in the Spring 2013 issue of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Ron:  Where do celiac disease and non celiac gluten sensitivity come from?
    Dr. Fine: We're talking about the dietary staple of Western Civilization, right? This is not the staple of the Asian diet or the African diet or the diet for the Americas. Not even all European populations have been eating it as long as those earliest farmers in the Middle East.  
    We have altered the wheat so much, through hybridization and seed selection, to have more gluten and to be more favorable for farming practices, that we have to look at what g...

    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat, RN
    Celiac.com 05/26/2015 - This may be the last week of Celiac Awareness Month, but you can still help us! This year I hope literature got to you soon enough to get you "on board" informing people about what celiac disease is and just what gluten intolerance is. For years many people reported having celiac-like symptoms—abdominal pain, fatigue, foggy mind, joint pain, tingling of the extremities, even depression, but repeatedly tested negative for celiac disease, and yet responded positively to the gluten free diet.
    So many people are still unaware of what celiac disease is, what a celiac can and cannot eat, and what
    signs to look for in their own b...