Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Skewered by Seitan? Vegan, Gluten-Free Food a Flop on Wedding Day

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    A lawsuit claims a hotel and other vendors ruined a couple's vegan wedding feast by serving inappropriate food, including seitan skewers for gluten-free guests; to the tune of one-hundred and fifty thousand dollars.

    Skewered by Seitan? Vegan, Gluten-Free Food a Flop on Wedding Day - Seitan. Photo: CC--Vegan Feast Catering
    Caption: Seitan. Photo: CC--Vegan Feast Catering

    Celiac.com 02/09/2018 - A newlywed couple have raised accusations of sick guests, inappropriate food, and breach of contract in filing suit against wedding vendors they say ruined their surprise vegan wedding, which was also to include gluten-free snacks for some guests.

    The wedding took place in May, 2017, and by Christmas, the family had already filed suit in Ramsey County against vendors Mintahoe, Inc., A'Bulae, LLC, and Bellagala for breach of contract. The lawsuit states the venue choice near Mears Park in downtown St. Paul was "absolutely contingent" on their commitment to provide a "delicious" vegan dinner to wedding guests.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    According to the couple, the main idea was to serve delicious food that guests would not suspect was "an entirely plant-based meal." The couple intended for the surprise to be revealed at the end of the night, when servers were to put out signs announcing that the entire meal had been vegan.

    Among the claims made by the family of the bride and groom are that a guest with celiac disease ate a seitan skewer that she believed was gluten-free, but which actually contained gluten, and that the guest became "very ill" as a result. The couple says the hotel's pastry chef took home the leftover vegan wedding cake the couple had ordered from an off-site vendor, instead of making sure it went to the wedding party.

    The couple's complaints go on to cite a litany of perceived offenses, including "horrific" food and service, "missing" bamboo shoots bean sprouts, too many carrots, and "horrific…sickeningly sweet," sauce that was not the peanut sauce they expected.

    The couple also complains that the groom's room before the wedding was "extremely hot and stifling," and disputes the cost of the menu for the wedding, which was mostly Thai food. In fairness, though, their main complaint seems to be that the food was terrible, rather than the fact that it wasn't vegan.

    The couple and mother-of-the-bride are seeking $21,721 for each of the seven counts of breach of contract, totaling $152,047, along with an award of damages to be determined at trial.

    What do you make of the situation? Right on the money, or a gluten-free bridge too far?

    Source: KTSP



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    " a guest with celiac disease ate a seitan skewer that she believed was gluten-free, but which actually contained gluten" I also got violently ill from seitan before I realized I had an issue with gluten, but I'm sorry. Unless it was labelled "gluten-free" why on earth would she assume it was gluten-free? Vegan and gluten-free are surely not interchangeable terms. If anything, vegan foods should always be consumed cautiously since they so heavily rely on vital wheat gluten as a primary ingredient. I don't see how the guest would have assumed it was anything other than unsafe to eat unless specifically labelled as gluten-free.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    With several family members being diagnosed as celiac and dealing with gluten free food choices for 50 years the basic tenet is to purchase ingredients in identifiable form, grind any grains at home and stick to very identifiable foods when away from home and always have food available when away from home. A vegan plus gluten free vegan "plus delicious wedding feast" is asking too much for caterers and the foolishness of asking for a vegan feast that was not obvious or requesting a specific menu is rather ignorant. Especially for a hypersensitive guest that should have food prepared in a separate area. Vegan would translate as no eggs, no butter, no dairy products, no fish, and no meat of any sort. In this part of the world I couldn't imagine raising a child on a vegan gluten free diet and expecting mainstream society to figure out the meals. Specific directions are required and the menu in detail explicitly indicated and labelled.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    It's difficult to tell without reading their contract with the various services involved. If gluten free was only discussed and not in the contract they have no claim in that regard. Didn't they get food samples prior to selecting the caterer? Most people do.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I think the article is great and covered everything. I believe that the only people entitled to compensation are the ones that got sick. Shame on the chef who took the cake that didn't belong to him, he should reimburse them. Did the happy couple taste test the food beforehand? It seems that they left it up to them to create appetizing food but that is leaving too much up to interpretation. What tastes good to me may not to you....

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Sounds like the wedding party did inadequate prep, research, and supervision regarding the food. Did they sample anything when they were ordering? Specify what was prohibited? Did they take a look at the presentation that was put out before their guests arrived? Also, their supposed rules and guidelines sound very ambiguous and prone to errors and misunderstanding.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - A 10-year-old girl allegedly fell ill after eating pizza that was supposed to be gluten-free, but which turned out to be standard pizza.
    The girl, Sydney Bayle, became violently ill, and ended up in the local emergency room. The attorney for Grotto Pizza says the company has admitted making a "mistake."
    Now the parents, Samuel and Victoria Bayle, of Edinboro, Erie County, are seeking monetary damages against both Grotto Pizza and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township, including doctors and nurses.
    After becoming ill and checking in at the Medical Center's Emergency Room, the parents claim that medical center staff made the Sydney wait for nearly three hours, where she continued to be ill enough to vomit blood.
    Sydney has suffered from celiac disease from birth, according to the complaint.
    Read more at: Timesleader.com


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/11/2017 - A UK man has filed a lawsuit against a local bar and grill after becoming sick on a gyro salad that servers led him to believe was gluten-free.
    The Webster Groves resident, Phillip "Gus" Wagner alleges that servers at Michael's Bar & Grill in Manchester, provided inaccurate information about the dish, and that he suffered an adverse reaction to the gluten in the dish that left him with "severe and permanent injuries."
    His lawyer, Christine Anderson of Faerber and Anderson, specifies that Mr. Wagner was injured in one or more of the following respects to wit: injuries to the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, internal organs, respiratory system and body as a whole; that he sustained an aggravation of a pre-existing condition; that said injuries are permanent and permanently disabling; that he has experienced pain and suffering in the past and is reasonably certain to experience pain and suffering in the future; that he has expended money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the past and is reasonably certain to expend money for necessary medical care, treatment and services in the future resulting from said occurrence; that he has lost the ordinary gains of his employment and will lose further such sums in the future; that he has sustained loss of a normal life.
    For their part, the restaurant says that the lawsuit is their first indication of any kind of a problem. Michale's general manager, Katina Malliotakis, says they had no indication that any customer had any kind of problem, until someone called and demanded to know their insurance company, and adding that that someone had told Wagner the gyro salad was gluten-free.
    Malliotakis says that Michale's special gluten-free menu does not include the gyro salad, and that her servers are all aware of that fact. "Nobody remembers a customer asking about the gyro salad,” she says.
    If someone did ask for a gluten-free salad, any server would have pointed them toward another salad on the menu that is gluten-free."We have plenty of gluten-free options if people ask for that," she says.
    What do you think? Mistaken restaurant? Mistaken patron? Much ado about nothing?
    Source:
    riverfronttimes.com


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/23/2018 - Benicar (olmesartan medoxomil) is a hypertension drug used for high blood pressure, and which is known to cause numerous side-effects in patients, including dangerous celiac sprue-like enteropathy, and is the subject of numerous lawsuits, and a $300 million settlement.
    Now the respected consumer advocacy group Public Citizen is calling for the FDA to ban the sale Benicar, due to the potential for side effects to which Public Citizen refers as "life-threatening." According to Public Citizen, originally founded by consumer advocate Ralph Nader, olmesartans risks outweigh any benefits.
    In a November 15 press release following their 20-page petition to the FDA, the organization warned that "Keeping the medication on the market would continue to put hypertension patients' lives at risk for the sake of corporate profits."
    While the FDA has formally acknowledged receiving the petition, there is no indication that any action is forthcoming any time soon. The agency can sometimes take years to act.
    Numerous drug experts note the availability of comparable hypertension drugs that are equally effective in lowering blood pressure without such dire side effects as the sprue-like enteropathy that "leads to severe and chronic diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and weight loss…that often lands a patient in the hospital," noted the petition.
    Sometimes this sprue-like enteropathy is misdiagnosed as a celiac disorder, when in reality it is due to olmesarten use.
    Benicar, together with Azor, Benicar HCT, and Tribenzor, are unique in their association with sprue-like enteropathy. It is why so many plaintiffs reference Benicar defective products in their allegations, and why Public Citizen wants them off the market.
    Source:
    lawyersandsettlements.com


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...