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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Slightly Higher Risk of Urinary Stones in Patients With Biopsy-verified Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Photo:CC--rkramer62

    Celiac.com 04/27/2012 - Urinary stone disease is condition often caused by malabsorption. Because of its high prevalence and incidence, doctors regard it as a serious issue. However, there are few population-based studies on the risk of urinary stone disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Photo:CC--rkramer62A team of medical researchers recently studied the risk of urinary stone disease in people with celiac disease. The research team included J. F. Ludvigsson, F. Zingone, M. Fored, C. Ciacci and M. Cirillo.

    For their population-based cohort study, the team used small intestinal biopsy reports gathered from all 28 Swedish pathology departments from 1969 to 2008. In all, the team found 28,735 patients with celiac disease, all with the equivalent of Marsh 3 villous atrophy.

    They then isolated a control group of 142,177 people from the Swedish general population. They matched patients and control subjects for age, gender, age, county and calendar year.

    Using Cox regression, they estimated hazard ratios for future urinary stone disease. Using conditional logistic regression they then calculated odds ratios for urinary stone disease before celiac disease diagnosis.

    The team used Swedish National Patient Register data on inpatient care, outpatient care and day surgery to find cases of urinary stone disease.

    During follow-up, a total of 314 people with celiac disease developed urinary stone disease, compared with 1142 from the control group.

    These numbers indicated that people with celiac disease face a 27% increased risk of urinary stone disease [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12–1.44].

    For celiac disease, patients the absolute risk of developing urinary stone disease was 107 cases per 100,000 person-years; which corresponds to an excess risk of 23 cases per 100,000 person years.

    Men and women faced similar risk levels, and showed no difference with respect to age at celiac disease diagnosis.

    Using conditional logistic regression the team found that celiac disease patients also faced a moderately higher risk of prior urinary stone disease (OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.06–1.33).

    The study indicates that people with celiac disease face a slightly higher risk of urinary stone disease both before and after celiac disease diagnosis.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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