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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Specially Treated Wheat Inhibits T-Cell Response to Gluten Protein in Celiacs

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 10/12/2007 - The presence of gluten serves to activate HLA-DQ2/DQ8-restricted intestinal specific T-cells. Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. A team of Italian researchers recently conducted a study to determine whether a new enzyme strategy might offer promise in abolishing adverse gluten-associated activity.

    The team used mass spectrometry to analyze enzyme modifications of immuno-dominant a-gliadin peptide P56-58 and modeling studies to determine the extent of peptide binding to HLA-DQ2.The team treated wheat flour with microbial transglutaminase and lysine methylesther. They then extracted, digested and deaminated the gliadin.

    They used biopsy specimens from 12 adults with known celiac disease to generate gliadin-specific intestinal T-cell lines (iTCLs), which they then challenged in vitro with various antigen solutions.

    The results showed that tissue TG-mediated transamidation with lysine methylesther of P56-58, or gliadin in alkaline conditions inhibited the interferon expression in iTCLs.

    Gastroenterology, Volume 133, Issue 3, September 2007; p780-789


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    Since becoming a celiac I tracked it back to malarial drugs administered during a malaria infestation 10 years ago. Before that time I had no food allergies or sensitivities to almost any food, especially wheat-produced types. Regrettably since that time I can no longer stomach wheat so I just avoid it.

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    I'm glad someone is doing research, however, if celiac disease is as prevalent as the statistics show, wouldn't it just be easier to stop using wheat. Then those who want to use wheat could pay the high prices! Yes, I'm a little bitter, symptomatic since birth and didn't find out what the problem was until I was in my late 40's.

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    Hopefully this and other research will produce products that our grandson, diagnosed at eight months, will use.

    Now 11, he follows a gluten-free diet religiously. but it isn't easy!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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