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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Specific Gene Tied to Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 01/08/2008 - Scientists at the University of Finland have announced the discovery of a particular gene that is tied to the development of the celiac-associated skin disease dermatitis herpetiformis, which is the form of celiac disease found in a full 25% of all celiacs. The gene is called myosin IXB, and it is located on chromosome 19p13.

    In addition to being connected with a higher risk of celiac disease in both Dutch and Spanish populations, the gene has been associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus, erythmatosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, which means that myosin IXB is likely a shared risk factor in all of these disorders.

    Researchers looked at nearly 500 Hungarian and Finnish families, plus another 270 patients and controls. What they found was a substantial linkage to chromosome 19p13 (LOD 3.76 P=0.00002) that lends great weight to the notion that this is a substantial risk factor. Other variants of the myosin IXB gene showed no connection with celiac disease, though they did show a small connection to dermatitis herpetiformis.

    Both phenotypes show a significant connection indicating that the role meaning that there still may be a role being played by nearby genes. They are calling for more comprehensive genetic and functional studies to determine what the exact nature of the role the myosin IXB gene in both celiac disease and in dermatitis herpetiformis.

    As more studies are conducted, and more data emerges, we are likely to get a much clearer genetic picture of both celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. A clearer genetic picture will likely lead to new and novel approaches to treatment that permit much more effective targeting of treatment.

    Journal of Med. Genet. 2007 Dec 12


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    I found this extremely interesting as I am a celiac and also have a tendency to dermatitis herpetiformis. Before I discovered that I have celiac disease I did have DH on my upper arms and back but I find that now I control my diet I only get the odd patch occasionally.

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    I have dermatitis herpetaformis - very severe. I am on 100% gluten free diet. I had 70% of my body covered with lesions before going on the diet. I still have to take dapsone. I have about 2% of my skin still involved...but it's improving. However, anything I eat that has any traces of gluten causes a severe bout of itching followed by lesions that take months to clear up. I have to be extremely vigilant about what I eat. I can NEVER cheat.

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    This is great news. I was diagnosed with Dermatitis Herpetaformis, then celiac disease 4 months later. I am also vigilant where they gluten is concerned (and am on the BOD of my local Celiac Disease Foundation Chapter). I wish there was more to help others with Dermatitis Herpetaformis, perhaps this will get us on track.

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    This is fabulous research to track. After plenty of research and experiments, I've found my 3 year old son also suffers Dermatitis Herpetaformis, as well as cocoa and lactose allergies, all thanks to his skin reacting - from blisters to rough patches. So much for the 'dermatolgist' suggesting steroid cream and 'Hamiltons' lotions - ha! Find a good diet and naturopath and stick to him! Keep the research coming!

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    Wow. It took us 18 months to find the celiac diagnosis in my wheelchair-bound, renal failure son. The existing diagnosis led the dermatologist to 'assume' the sudden appearance of skin issues were related. Although we are now almost 4 weeks into the celiac diagnosis (2 previous gastroenterologists missed it), it was not until I read this article that I knew what the skin condition is called. Maybe I should educate the dermatologist.

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    I have terrible itchy area that I believe is Dermatitis Herpetaformis, and I have celiac disease as my tTG was very very high (181) I am always looking for info. on DH, as i suffer terrible from painful itch. It eased with gluten free but worse while in FLA. So might have some other issues. Anyone know an expert in DH in the northeast?

     

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    I have it on my face all of a sudden. I went on the gluten-free diet and it cleared mostly but now....yuk!

     

    I got glutened when the hurricane hit and couldn't get my gluten-free foods and have had a terrible time getting things back to where I was prior to that event.

     

    I have found that using hydrogen peroxide after washing with a mild soap and rinsing well seems to help the lesions heal faster.

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    I was treated by my Dr. For ulcers on my hands [ I had had a + lupus test and had told him I was allergic to penicillin] with penicillin and lost all the skin on my body tanned by the sun I almost died. He Died, new Dr would not take biopsy for celiac. I had rash on 70% of my body I went gluten free and have only small rash on feet, hands and elbows. What do you do to get 100% proof, without going back to gluten and the rash.

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    After years of treating my Dermatitis Herpetiformis with Dovonex and fluocinonide creams I found out 6 weeks ago that I had celiac disease. I then went on a gluten free diet and my Dermatitis Herpetiformis is clearing up. I have Dermatitis Herpetiformis on my elbows, knees and shins. I still have to get the B12 shot each month and still take folic acid (2 pills ) everyday but I am feeling better. I am just amazed that with all the doctors and dermatologist that it took the Veterans Hospital in Richmond VA to find out the correct diagnosis of this disease.

     

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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