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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Specific Serological Tests Can Now Reliably Detect All Cases of Celiac Disease

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    V. Kumar,* M. Jarzabek-Chorzelska, J. Sulej, Krystyna Karnewska,** T.
    Farrell,* and S. Jablonska

    *IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc., Buffalo, New York 14228; Departments of Microbiology and Dermatology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214; and Department of Dermatology, Warsaw School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland; ** Department of Gastroenterology and Pediatrics, Selesian School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

    Clinical Diagnostic Immunology 9:1295-1300, 2002.

    Celiac.com 12/31/2002 - Background: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is 10-15 times more common in patients with Celiac Disease (celiac disease) than in normal subjects. Serological tests have become the preferred methods of detecting both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with celiac disease. However, commercially available serological methods are limited in that they detect only the IgA isotype of antibodies (with the exception of IgG gliadin assays); hence, IgA deficient celiac disease patients may yield false negative serology.

    Methods: Fifteen celiac disease and ten non-celiac disease IgA deficient pediatric cases were examined for IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium, gliadin and tissue
    transglutaminase.

    Results: Twenty five specimens with IgA deficiency were examined. Fifteen were celiac disease cases and ten were non-celiac disease cases. All fifteen IgA deficient celiac disease cases were positive for endomysium antibodies of the IgG isotype and for IgG gliadin antibodies. All but one of the IgA deficient celiac disease cases were also positive for IgG tissue transglutaminase antibodies. None of the non-celiac disease IgA deficient cases were positive for any of the antibody markers. All the specimens examined were also negative for IgA specific antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase.

    Conclusions: IgG specific antibody tests for endomysium, gliadin and tissue transglutaminase are useful for the identification of IgA deficient celiac disease patients. IgG antibody tests along with tests routinely being used in clinical laboratories can reliably detect all active celiac disease patients. In addition, the levels of these celiac disease-specific IgG antibodies could be used to monitor patient dietary compliance.


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  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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