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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Stella Artois Looks for Big Hit with New Gluten-Free Version

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Beverage giant AB InBev will launch a gluten-free version of its popular and widely distributed Stella Artois lager in the UK in August. The company says that Stella Artois Gluten Free will use the same ingredients.

    Stella Artois Looks for Big Hit with New Gluten-Free Version - Image: Stella Artois
    Caption: Image: Stella Artois

    Celiac.com 07/30/2018 - In what looks like great news for UK beer drinkers, beverage giant AB InBev has announced plans to launch a gluten-free version of its popular and widely distributed Stella Artois lager in the UK. Stella Artois Gluten Free will hit UK grocery shelves in August in 4-packs of 330ml bottles, before a more comprehensive roll out this fall. 

    AB InBev said that Stella Artois Gluten Free “will maintain the high quality and exacting standards of the original Stella Artois recipe,” and will use the same four natural ingredients. The final product will use a specific protein to remove gluten, which the company claims has no affect on the beer’s flavor or other characteristics.



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    Stella Artois Gluten Free will be displayed outside traditional alcohol aisles, raising brand visibility. AB InBev is clearly motivated by sales and revenues in the rapidly growing gluten-free market. The company noted that UK sales of free-from products grew 36% between 2016 and 2017, while revenues from gluten-free beer sales rose 83%.

    Stella Artois Europe marketing director Alexis Berger says that the company is “incredibly excited to be…making the UK’s favorite beer brand more accessible to those who follow a gluten-free lifestyle.”

    Making Stella Artois gluten-free will allow gluten-free consumers, to enjoy “the UK’s number one selling alcohol brand,” Berger added.

    No word on whether AB InBev will be making Stella Artois Gluten Free available in the United States. Read more in this press release.

    Are you a beer drinker who appreciates a good gluten-free lager? Let us know your thoughts on the news that Stella Artois Gluten Free will soon be a thing, if only in the UK for now. Also, please be sure to let us know your thoughts if you get a chance to try the product.


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    Won’t come to US since:

    1.) AB InBev won’t want to cannabalize Redbridge and,

    2.) Being a barley-based beer, it can’t be marketed as gluten-free, but as gluten-reduced and as such will have to contain a warning to consumers that, among other things, “...product may actually contain gluten.”

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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    Leszek Jaszczak
    Celiac.com 04/15/2017 - Raw materials used by breweries include barley. A characteristic feature of this grain is the presence of gluten proteins which also includes hordein. This group of proteins are the trigger of celiac disease symptoms [Darewicz, Dziuba, Jaszczak: "Celiakia – aspekty molekularne, technologiczne, dietetyczne." PrzemysÅ‚ Spożywczy, styczeÅ„, 2011] . This issue raises the need to seek new methods of brewing that allow for the elimination of gluten proteins from the beer [swora E., Stankowiak-Kulpa H., Mazur M. 2009. Dieta bezglutenowa w chorobie trzewnej. Nowiny Lekarskie 78, 5-6, 324-329]. The biggest problem for coeliac patients is to identify permitted foods. Food manufacturers know about the above problem and are offering new products for people with celiac disease. [CichaÅ„ska B.A., 2009. Problemy z rozróżnianiem żywnoÅ›ci bezglutenowej. Pediatria WspóÅ‚czesna. Gastroenterologia, Hepatologia i Å»ywienie Dziecka 2009, 11, 3, 117-122.] The market offers access to a gluten-free beer. Beer of this type can be prepared in one of two ways, either by using materials that do not contain gluten or by removing gluten during the production of beer. Such products are, however, expensive. Traditional market beers are not tested for gluten content, which may differ from one brand to the next.
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