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    Storied Czech Brewery Quietly Brews Great Gluten-free Dark Beer

    Jefferson Adams
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    Celiac.com 07/29/2016 - There's a great little story by Pete Brown about his visit to the Zatec brewery in the Czech Republic. Officially known as Zatecky Pivovar, but called Zatec, the brewery offers both an interesting war history, and a great dark beer that just happens to be gluten-free.

    Zatec makes both their main brand, the light 11° pilsner, and another brand called Celia Dark. The company used to make a dark beer called Xantho, but now sells only Celia Dark as their main dark beer because, says Martin Kec, managing director, "no one can tell the difference."



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    Most gluten-free beers are made with non-barley grains, such as sorghum, which is naturally gluten-free. The problem is that many of these beverages cannot be considered beer under German law, and many don't taste all that great either.

    But Celia is brewed with barley, just like normal beer, then de-glutenised with the addition of a special enzyme that breaks down the gluten molecules, binds to them and sinks to the bottom of the fermentation tank, where it is then filtered out before bottling.

    Rather than thinking of it as a gluten-free beer, says Martin, it's more useful to describe it as a great beer that just happens to be gluten-free.

    Read more in the Morning Advertiser.co.uk.

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    Isn't this just another Omission then? A beer that is not totally gluten-free, but has its ppm numbers below a certain threshold? If so, it is still dangerous for those whose celiac is very sensitive.

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    Mistakes happen. Not sure I'd be willing to take the risk on any beer made with gluten ingredients on the faith that all the gluten has been removed every time with no error. Not worth it.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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