Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Study Shows Pea Protein Best for Improving Gluten-free Bread

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 05/20/2013 - A team of researchers recently looked at the influence of various proteins on the quality of gluten-free bread formulas. Specifically, the team looked at the influence of different concentrates or isolates of protein on the structure, properties and aging of gluten-free bread.

    Photo: CC-- United States GovernmentThe research team included Rafał Ziobroa, Teresa Witczakb, Lesław Juszczakc, and Jarosław Korusa. They are affiliated with the Department of Carbohydrates Technology, the Department of Engineering and Machinery for Food Industry, and the Department of Analysis and Evaluation of Food Quality, at the University of Agriculture, in Krakow, Poland.

    For their study they made gluten-free breads from dough that included albumin, collagen, pea, lupine or soy protein.

    They then analyzed the rheological properties of the dough, and found that bread made with added test proteins showed major differences in its visco-elastic properties.

    Different flours had different effects on specific volume of the loaves. Soy protein and collagen reduced bread volume, while lupine and albumin significantly increased bread volume.

    In each case, the added proteins had a noticeable impact on the color and textural properties of bread crumbs.

    Most of the protein preparations significantly decreased hardness and chewiness of the crumb compared to the control sample.

    Overall, the dough that contained pea protein yielded bread with the most acceptable qualities. The study demonstrated that pea protein created the most acceptable flavor, color, smell and bread crumb in the final product.

    Soy protein proved to be the least acceptable of those tested, as it produced loaves with smaller volume and a compact structure. The results of this study show that adding pea protein can improve bread quality, and help to slow staling of starch based bread.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Way to show a picture of a package of peas with an allergen warning on it. At least the last time I read this package it said"may contain wheat" or the "processed in the same facility"warning.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Where can you purchase pea protein? How much did they use? Did the pea protein alter the taste of the bread or give it an aftertaste?

    I'd be interested in a response to Susie's question thanks.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Linda Williams

    Posted

    I am allergic to legumes and have celiac, that means I cannot eat gluten free foods that use pea protein or bean flours. A variety of foods are needed to meet the needs of those of us with multiple food restrictions.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Wendy Cohan, RN
    Celiac.com 11/12/2008 - It's not as hard as you might think!  It's easy to start with the big items—a gluten-free turkey, gluten-free stuffing, gluten-free pumpkin pie, and of course, gluten-free gravy.  All are easily achievable by the average home cook, and no one will be able to tell anything is different or unusual—just a lovingly prepared meal full of flavor.
    Order an or...

    Jules Shepard
    This recipe calls for my Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour™.  You can find the recipe for this flour in mycookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating or in various media links on my website, or you can also this truly all purpose flourready-made at my site. It produces amazing results in all your gluten-free baking.

    Sweet Potato Bundt Cake

    The leaves are ne...

    Jules Shepard
    Ok, I know these cookies aren't free from peanuts, but they are peanut butter cookies, after all!  If you can do almonds, but not peanuts, definitely try this recipe with almond butter – yum!
    For the rest of us with other dietary restrictions, take heart! These cookies fit the bill! They're delicious, and still gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free, and sugar-free! Y...

    Jules Shepard
    Correctly measure your flour. When measuring flour, don’t scoop from the bag with your measuring cup.  This compresses the flour.  Use a spoon to scoop flour into the measuring cup and level off with a knife. This will ensure that your flour is measured properly. Bring your ingredients to room temperature before mixing. It is particularly important for yeast recipes to bring all...

  • Forum Discussions

    We mostly do our own immediate family thing for holiday meals. Christmas time is different. My spouse's family know I prefer to go before dinner, while most are having appetizers and drinks. They have learned to flip their night for ...
    Here's a great article on SIBO... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3099351/ From this article, I learned SIBO can cause vitamin B12 deficiency that doesn't show up on regular tests.  There's a section about Celiac Disease ...
    Hi, this is an old post and the other posters might not be around. Yes, Celiac Disease causes malabsorption which results in malnutrition.  Vitamin and mineral deficiencies can occur. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3...
×
×
  • Create New...