Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    Study Suggests New Treatments for T-Cell Lymphomas May Lie Ahead

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 11/08/2012 - T-cell lymphoma is a deadly type of cancer that is more common in people with celiac disease than in the general population. Currently, there is no cure for T-cell lymphoma, and no promising treatment exists for people who suffer from this condition.

    Photo: CC--National Eye InstituteHowever, that may be set to change, as the results of a new study suggest that new treatments for T-cell lymphoma my be on the horizon. The study appears in the journal Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The study team included J.R. Bertino, M. Lubin, N. Johnson-Farley, W.C. Chan, L. Goodell, and S. Bhagavathi. They are affiliated with the Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, and Pathology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ.

    The team was attempting to address the fact that doctors treating T-cell lymphomas, especially types of T-cell lymphoma known as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) have limited treatment options and cannot cure the condition.

    Their study noted that a high percentage of PTCL, AITL, and ALCL, along with T-cell leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia lack the enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP).

    Their published results also note that MTAP-deficient cells cannot cleave endogenous methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate, a precursor of methionine, and as a result have enhanced sensitivity to inhibitors of de novo purine biosynthesis.

    A recently introduced antifolate, pralatrexate, which has been shown to inhibit de novo purine biosynthesis, has been approved for treatment of PTCL and may have an increasing role in therapy. An alternative strategy involving coadministration of methylthioadenosine and high-dose 6-thioguanine has been proposed and may prove to be selectively toxic to MTAP-deficient uncommon lymphomas.

    As a result of these MTAP results, the team suggests that new therapies and treatments for T-cell lymphoma may be possible going forward.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    QJM, May 1, 2003; 96(5): 345 - 353
    Celiac.com 05/29/2003 – A survey was recently conducted by Professor P.D. Howdle, St. Jamess University Hospital (UK), et al, to estimate the frequency in the UK of small bowel malignancy, and its relationship to celiac disease. Data were collected from 1,327 clinicians on a monthly basis between June 1998 and May 2000. The clinicians were asked to report all cases of newly diagnosed primary small bowel malignancy, and whether or not the patients reported also had celiac disease. Normally malignancies of the small intestine are rare, and they only account for less than 2% of all gastrointestinal cancers. <...

    Scott Adams
    BMJ. 2004 Jul 21
    Celiac.com 08/09/2004 – In a study designed to quantify the malignancy and mortality risks associated with celiac disease, British researchers examined 4,732 celiac disease patients and compared them to 23,620 matched controls. The researchers found that 134 (2.8%) of those with celiac disease had at least one malignancy, and 237 (5.0%) had died. In the general population, the overall hazard ratios were as follows: for any malignancy 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.55), for mortality 1.31 (1.13 to 1.51), for gastrointestinal cancer 1.85 (1.22 to 2.81), for breast cancer 0.35 (0.17 to 0.72), for lung cancer 0.34 (0....

    Hallie Davis
    Celiac.com 02/28/2008 - A study published in the Leukemia Research Journal (Volume 30, issue 12, Pages 1585-1586 - December 2006) looked at samples of serum from multiple myeloma patients. In 35% of the samples the myeloma monoclonal proteins had antigliadin activity, and migrated just like celiac anti-gliadin antibodies when subjected to electrophoresis. Monoclonal gammopathy (MGUS) is a precursor stage to multiple myeloma, with the same or very similar sort of monoclonal proteins as in multiple myeloma, and converts to it at the rate of about 1.5% per year. Therefore if one lives for 20 years after diagnosis with MGUS, one has a 30% chance of ending up...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/17/2010 - People with celiac disease have higher risk for developing lymphoma and small bowel malignancy, though most studies have found no higher risk of colorectal cancer.
    To compare rates of colorectal cancer in celiac disease patients with rates for non-celiac disease control subjects, Dr. Peter Greene and colleagues at Columbia University Medical Center conducted a study. The research team included B. Lebwohl, E. Stavsky, and A. I. Neugut.
    For the study, the team reviewed case data for all celiac disease patients who underwent colonoscopy at Columbia Medical Center during a 44-month period. They matched each patient with non-coeliac...