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  • Jefferson Adams

    Study Tracks Rates of Celiac and Type 1 Diabetes in Youth on Three Continents

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Researchers recently set out to examine differences in disease rates and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and celiac disease.


    A recent study tracked rates of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes in youth on three continents. Photo: CC--Pete
    Caption: A recent study tracked rates of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes in youth on three continents. Photo: CC--Pete

    Celiac.com 07/05/2017 - Numerous researchers have documented a connection between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes.

    One team of researchers recently set out to examine international differences in celiac disease rates and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and celiac disease compared with type 1 diabetes only.



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    The research team included Maria E. Craig, Nicole Prinz, Claire T. Boyle, Fiona M. Campbell, Timothy W. Jones, Sabine E. Hofer, Jill H.Simmons, Naomi Holman, Elaine Tham, Elke Fröhlich-Reiterer, Stephanie DuBose, Helen Thornton, Bruce King, David M. Maahs, Reinhard W. Holl and Justin T. Warner.

    To analyze the relationship between outcomes, including HbA1c, height-standard deviation score [sDS], overweight/obesity, and type 1 diabetes with celiac disease versus type 1 diabetes alone, adjusting for sex, age, and diabetes duration, the team created multivariable linear and logistic regression models.

    The analysis included 52,721 people under 18 years of age with a clinic visit between April 2013 and March 2014. The team used the following data sources: the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up registry (Germany/Austria); the T1D Exchange Clinic Network (T1DX) (U.S.); the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (U.K. [England/Wales]); and the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) (Australia).

    The researchers found biopsy-confirmed celiac disease in 1,835 young people, or 3.5%. These patients were diagnosed on average at age 8.1 years, with a range of 5.3 to 11.2 years.

    Most young people (37%) with diabetes upon celiac disease diagnosis had it for less than one year. Eighteen percent with diabetes had it for 1-2 years at celiac diagnosis, 23% had diabetes between 3 and 5 years at celiac diagnosis, while 17% had diabetes for more than 5 years at celiac diagnosis. Celiac disease rates ranged from 1.9% in the T1DX to 7.7% in the ADDN and were higher in girls than boys (4.3% vs. 2.7%, P < 0.001).

    Children with coexisting celiac disease were diagnosed with diabetes at 5.4 years on average, compared with those with type 1 diabetes only, who were diagnosed at 7.0 years of age, on average. Also, fewer children with both conditions were non-white, 15 vs. 18%.

    Height-SDS was lower in those with celiac disease (0.36 vs. 0.48) and fewer were overweight/obese (34 vs. 37%, adjusted P < 0.001), whereas average HbA1c values were comparable: 8.3 ± 1.5% (67 ± 17 mmol/mol) versus 8.4 ± 1.6% (68 ± 17 mmol/mol).

    This study clearly documented that celiac disease is not uncommon in young people with type 1 diabetes. Differences in disease rates may be due to variations in screening and diagnostic practices, and/or risk levels.

    Although the groups showed similar glycemic control, the research team encourages close monitoring of growth and nutrition in this population, due to the lower height-SDS.

    Source:

     

    The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre Westmead, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL; Leeds Children’s Hospital, Leeds, U.K.; The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K.; Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; St. Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, St. Helens, U.K.; John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia; Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA; and the Children's Hospital for Wales, Cardiff, U.K.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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