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    Can Better Tax Rules Help Promote Gluten-free Diet for Celiacs?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 02/23/2016 - An estimated 350,000 Canadians have been diagnosed with celiac disease. For these people following a strict gluten-free diet is essential, not only for gut healing and symptom relief, but to avoid celiac-related complications such as anemia, osteoporotic fractures and small bowel lymphoma.


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    Photo: CC--401(K) 2012However, a gluten-free diet can be challenging to follow, inconvenient and expensive. To help reduce costs and make things easier for celiacs, authorities have tried various schemes, including tax reduction, cash transfer, food provision, prescription and subsidies.

    But what works best? A team of researchers recently assessed the tax-deductible provisions for a gluten-free diet in Canada compared it with other countries.

    The research team included MI Pinto-Sanchez, EF Verdu, MC Gordillo, JC Bai, S Birch, P Moayyedi, and P Bercik. Their recent review highlights advantages and disadvantages in relation to promoting compliance with a gluten-free diet.

    The tax offset system used in Canada for gluten-free diet coverage takes the form of a reimbursement for prior food costs. Hence, the program does not help celiac patients reduce the costs of gluten-free foods, it just provides a later refund of a portion of those costs.

    In the research team's view, the best approach would lie in subsidizing gluten-free products through controlled vouchers or direct food provision to those who most need it, independent of 'ability or willingness to pay'. Moreover, they suggest, if such a program is too costly, the value of the benefits could be made taxable to ensure that any patient contribution, in terms of additional taxation, is directly tied to the ability to pay.

    The team says the limited coverage of Canadians' gluten-free diets is concerning, and suggest that there is a substantial unmet need for gluten-free dietary resources among celiac patients in Canada.

    Ultimately the team recommends that the Canadian medical community and the Canadian Celiac Association take a larger role in promoting improved access to gluten-free resources for people with celiac disease.

    Source:

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    Strongly agree with their findings. After having visited Italy it seems like Canada has some catching up to do.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This article appeared in the Autumn 2004 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. It originally appeared in the book A Personal Touch On...™ Celiac Disease. ©A Personal Touch Publishing, LLC.
    Celiac.com 10/27/2004 - For at least the last 15 years I have gone to several doctors with a host of various gastrointestinal disorders. The most common diagnosis I received was Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Finally, in May of 2003, I found a doctor who was thorough enough to check for Celiac Disease. I have been on the gluten-free diet ever since and feel wonderful!
    When first diagnosed with Celiac Disease, I suppose I was like most people—overwhelmed by the magnitude of the lifestyle change associated with the gluten-free diet. Once reality set in and I began to accept and deal with this new diet, I experienced another overwhelming feeling—the high cost of gluten-free foods! While I was not on a tight budget, the idea of spending four times as much for a loaf of bread that was only half the size was daunting to say the least. I immediately began searching for ways to diminish this extra expense.
    My research took me to the Internet, where I discovered that according to several IRS rulings (Revenue Ruling 55-261; Revenue Ruling 76-80, 67 TC 481; Cohen 38 TC 37; Van Kalb TC MEMO 1978 366; Flemming TC MEMO 1980 583), the cost difference between gluten containing food products and specialty gluten-free alternatives is tax deductible for Celiac patients. However, it didnt turn out to be that simple.
    Further research revealed that only the portion which exceeds a 7.5% threshold of adjusted gross income for all medical expenses combined would be deductible. In English, that meant that if I had an income of $50,000, I would only be able to deduct my extra expense of gluten-free foods (and any other legally deductible medical expense) that exceeded $3,750 (7.5% of $50,000)! Well, gluten-free foods are not that expensive!
    Knowing I would never reach that deductibility threshold, my search continued. Suddenly, a rare epiphany befell me. Since the IRS had ruled specialty foods that are medically necessary to treat a condition are deductible, it may follow that these same expenses may be reimbursable through my employers Flexible Spending Account program.
    Basically, the Flexible Spending Account is a plan that allows you, the employee, to set up a separate savings account, usually administered by a third party. You decide at the beginning of the year how much to contribute to this account. The contributions are deducted from your payroll before tax (meaning you are not charged income tax on the portion of your income you put into the account). As you have out of pocket medical expenses, you file a claim from the Flexible Spending Account administrator for reimbursement of those expenses. Once the account is emptied, no further reimbursements are possible for that year. One caveat with these plans is that they are "use it or lose it," which means that if you do not have sufficient medical expenses equal to the amount contributed you will forfeit any unclaimed balance. Your human resources department should be able to tell you if your company offers a Flexible Spending Account.
    In my case, I first called the human resources department at my place of employment to find out if indeed my rationale was valid. The response was "I dont know, but I doubt it"! Never one to take no for an answer (especially when preceded by "I dont know"!), I pressed on. A phone call to the Flexible Spending Account administration company yielded the answer I had hoped for—YES!
    Fortunately, I happened to connect with a customer service representative who was extremely thorough and diligent. She had to put me on hold several times, but she finally found not only the answer I was looking for, but also the proper procedure for filing a claim. She sent me a worksheet that I now use to file any claim for gluten-free foods. The sheet has a place to list the food item, cost of the gluten-free variety, cost of the gluten-containing variety, and the price difference. I made several copies of the worksheet, so now whenever I file a claim, I just fill out a new sheet. The receipts for the food items I am requesting reimbursement for must be included each time with the worksheet. With my first claim, I also had to provide a letter from my doctor clearly stating I was diagnosed with celiac disease and that I must be on a gluten-free diet. They keep this letter on file, so I do not have to send it each time.
    Generally speaking, any medical expense the IRS considers deductible (on Schedule A of your 1040 form) is reimbursable, however, employers are not obligated to follow those guidelines. They are not able to add other expenses that are not deductible, but they can delete certain ones (like gluten-free foods) if they choose. So it behooves you to check with your Flexible Spending Account administrator to find out what your plan covers and the proper procedure for reimbursement. It may be necessary to ask to speak to a supervisor, since not every customer service representative will be as helpful as the one I had. You may wish to cite the IRS rulings I listed earlier to convince them to accept this as a reimbursable item. This can also be helpful to convince them to reimburse gluten-free food items if they do not currently do so.
    While it is still your money that is paying for the entire cost of gluten-free food, using the Flexible Spending Account to switch that money to the tax free variety can add up to significant savings. Depending on the amount of gluten-free food you are buying, and your tax bracket, it can easily be over $100 per year in tax savings!

    Howard J. Kass, CPA
    Celiac.com 03/05/2012 - When I first wrote about the tax treatments available to diagnosed Celiacs for the additional costs they incur by following a Gluten-Free diet fifteen years ago, the law was pretty well established and there were no significant changes in the works. The advent of Section 125 plans shortly thereafter, also known as Flexible Spending Arrangements (FSA) added a new twist to the quest for tax deductions. With all the hoopla that has taken place in the last year, both with health care reform and tax legislation, what has changed?
    Overview of the Medical Expense Deduction
    Before I talk about what has changed, it is important to review the basics of the medical expense deduction and how it relates to the additional costs of following a Gluten-Free diet. Section 213 of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) provides an itemized deduction for qualified medical expenses incurred. Under present law, medical expenses are deductible to the extent that they exceed 7.5% of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). AGI is the number shown on the last line of the first page of form 1040.
    So, for an individual who has an AGI of $100,000, the “floor” they have to exceed is $7,500 before any of their medical expenses begin to be deductible. If one is in relatively good health and if their employer pays for their health insurance, it is unlikely that one would have enough qualified medical expenses to take the deduction.
    The Gluten-Free Component
    Now, let’s bring the cost of Gluten-Free food into the equation. Based on a variety of Revenue Rulings and court cases, sufficient precedent has been established for one who has been diagnosed with Celiac Disease (or any other medical condition requiring adherence to a Gluten-Free diet) to claim a medical deduction for the additional costs of following a Gluten-Free diet. I will cite the applicable law at the end of this article.
    So, how does one calculate the cost of following the Gluten-Free diet and, equally important, how does one document those costs? Calculating the cost of following the diet is a matter of tracking the costs of purchasing food items that are necessary to the diet and subtracting the costs of comparable non-Gluten-Free versions of the same food. So, for example, if a loaf of Gluten-Free bread costs you $6.00 and a comparable loaf of “regular” bread costs $2.00, the deductible cost of the Gluten-Free bread would be $4.00.
    What about those items for which there is no counterpart in the non-Gluten-Free community? One example of this would be Xantham Gum. In that event, the total cost of the product would be deductible.
    It’s easy to discuss this process on an item by item basis, but how does one accumulate this data and perform the calculations for a year? First, it is important to collect and retain detailed receipts of every purchase you wish to deduct. You would then need to create a spreadsheet on which to track this data for the year. While I recommend the use of an electronic spreadsheet, pencil and paper will also serve the purpose. If cost is what stands in your way of using a product like Microsoft Excel, check out OpenOffice.org. It is a free Microsoft compatible office suite that should serve your purposes quite well. I would strongly encourage you to collect this data and update your spreadsheet after each shopping trip.
    Where do Flexible Spending Arrangements Come In?
    As mentioned earlier, depending on the amount of your AGI, you may still not have accumulated enough in deductible medical expenses to be able to take the deduction. However, under current law, if you participate in a Section 125 plan with an FSA and, if your FSA plan allows it, you may be able to reimburse yourself for the additional costs of following a Gluten-Free diet. If you can do that, you have effectively achieved an “above the line” deduction for following the Gluten-Free diet. Similarly, since Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) follow the same rules as FSAs, that may also provide you with an opportunity to get your medical deductions, including the additional costs of observing a Gluten-free diet above the line. For those who are unfamiliar with HSAs, they are only available to those who use them in conjunction with a high-deductible health insurance plan. See your tax advisor for more information or e-mail me with your questions.
    Getting back to the discussion on FSAs, however, before you rejoice, there are a couple of caveats to be aware of. First, your 125 plan has to permit this reimbursement. You will need to check with your plan administrator and, perhaps, read the plan document yourself. Be prepared to educate the plan administrator on this issue. Also, after you read the effect that Health Care Reform is going to have on health care expenses in FSAs, you may determine that it isn’t worth the effort. More on that later.
    So, What’s Changed?
    Two significant changes that will affect one’s ability to deduct the costs of following a Gluten-Free diet are slated to occur in the name of Health Care Reform.
    First, the floor for deducting medical expenses is scheduled to increase from 7.5% of AGI to 10% beginning in 2013. If you or your spouse will be age 65 or over at that time, the increase to 10% will take place in 2017. Going back to our example from before, if one has an AGI of $100,000, instead of medical expenses having to exceed a floor of $7,500 to be deductible, they would have to exceed $10,000. This increase would obviously make one think twice about accumulating all the data described earlier!
    Another change slated to take place in 2013 would affect the strategy of paying for the costs of following a Gluten-Free diet from an FSA. Beginning in 2013, the maximum amount that could be contributed to a health FSA will be limited to $2,500. There is currently no limit! This cap will reduce the value of paying the costs of following a Gluten-Free diet because doing so will limit the amount available to pay for other health related expenses. Since HSAs are less restrictive, there may be an opportunity here to improve your deduction options.
    So, What’s the Bottom Line?
    Until the end of 2012, as the law currently stands, it is business as usual in terms of how (if at all) you have been deducting your costs of following a Gluten-Free diet. You must have a diagnosis that requires you to follow a Gluten-Free diet and your costs are potentially deductible as an itemized deduction to the extent they exceed 7.5% of your AGI. If you participate in an FSA, you may be able to pay those expenses through your plan. Check with your plan administrator.
    Beginning in 2013, however, the landscape changes. You will have a higher hurdle to overcome to take the itemized deduction and you will be subject to new restrictions in the amounts that can be paid through an FSA. That’s all true as of this writing. As you must certainly be aware, Health Care is a very volatile issue in Washington right now and there are many who believe that it will look very different than it does right now, by the time 2013 rolls around. Congress isn’t done tinkering yet – stay tuned.
    Cites to the Law
    For those who want to learn more, here are some of the more relevant cites to the tax law:

    §213 of the Internal Revenue Code Rev Rul 55-261 Rev Rul 76-80 Cohen v. Commissioner, 38 TC 387 Randolph v. Commissioner, 67 TC 481 Fleming, TC MEMO 1980 583 Van Kelb, TC MEMO 1978 366 §9013(a)-( of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, P.L. 111-148, 3/23/2010 §125(i)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code as amended by 2010 Health Care Act §10902(a)

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/21/2014 - According to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, the burden of celiac disease can cost an extra $1,000 to $2,500 per year. However, many people who eat gluten-free diets as treatment for celiac disease or other medical conditions are eligible for tax breaks.
    Those who do eat gluten-free due to medical conditions will be happy to learn that both the Internal Revenue Service and the Canada Revenue Agency list gluten-free food as an eligible medical expense. That means that filers may be eligible for tax relief for gluten-free-related food expenses.
    For example, according to the Canada Revenue Agency website, celiac disease suffers are "entitled to claim the incremental costs associated with the purchase of gluten-free products as a medical expense." That means Canadians with celiac disease can claim the difference between the cost of their gluten-free food and the cost of comparable regular food. However, there are a few hoops to jump through. To claim the credit, Canadian taxpayers need a doctor's letter confirming celiac disease; a receipt for every item claimed; and a summary for each item calculating the cost differential for gluten-free products.
    U.S. residents can deduct the extra cost for gluten-free foods and goods purchased to meet celiac dietary needs. Shipping and delivery costs for those gluten-free products can also be deducted. Also, for any special trip to purchase gluten-free foods, the cost of transportation to and from the store is deductible, including mileage, tolls and parking fees. The vehicle deduction for trips during 2013 is 24 cents per mile.
    To claim these deductions, taxpayers first need an official, written celiac diagnosis from a doctor. A copy of this diagnosis must be submitted with other completed tax forms.
    Taxpayers will then complete form 1040 schedule A for medical deductions. For reference taxpayers may cite: IRS Publication 502; Revenue Rulings: 55-261, 76-80, 2002-19 and 67 TC 481; Cohen 38 TC 387; Flemming TC MEMO 1980 583; and Van Kalb TC MEMO 1978 366
    This must be supported with copies of receipts for all gluten-free purchases, along with lists of prices for gluten-free food and regular counterparts being claimed.
    The difference between those prices is tax-deductible. For example, if a pound of wheat flour costs $0.60 and a pound of rice flour costs $3.40, then you may deduct $2.80 for each pound of rice flour you are claiming for that tax year.
    Remember, some specialty products like xanthan gum and sorghum flour are fully tax-deductible as they have no "regular" counterpart but are purchased to meet your dietary needs.
    Of course, for specific advice, contact an accountant.
    Sources:
    CAFinance.com CeliacCentral.org
    Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/10/2016 - Can you take a tax deduction for your celiac-related gluten-free purchases? Well, income tax season is upon us once again, and so it's time to brush up on our tax rules.
    People with celiac disease can rack up thousands of dollars per year in extra food, medical, and other health-related costs. However, many people who eat gluten-free diets as treatment for celiac disease or other medical conditions may be eligible for tax breaks.
    Check out our earlier article on the topic: Are You Due For a Gluten-free Tax Break. Also, check out The Celiac Tax Deduction: What's New? by Howard J. Kass, C.P.A.
    Meanwhile, over at Forbes, Todd Ganos has a funny article where he riffs on gluten-free and celiac themes to drive home the point that one-size trusts and asset protection schemes are often not what they claim to be, and many of them are ineffective products aimed at people with less resources. To avoid getting stuck with a poor product, Ganos recommends turning to the IRS and to US case law to best vet the contents of any given asset protection product, especially such names as "The Gluten-Free Impenetrable Castle Asset Protection Trust."
    Remember, if you eat a gluten-free diet as treatment for celiac disease or other medical conditions you may be eligible for tax breaks.
    First and foremost, we at Celiac.com are neither lawyers, accountants, or tax professionals, and do not give tax advice. So, be sure to check in with the IRS, an accountant or a tax professional for answers to your specific tax questions and challenges. Stay tuned for more as tax season progresses.

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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
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    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com