Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    The Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Research (CEDAR) Project

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The following was written by one of the CEDAR staff, Stephanie Tudor - TudorS@jove.uchsc.edu. Anyone with further questions should contact her directly. If you live in Denver and are biopsy-confirmed, they would love to hear from you.

    The Celiac Disease Autoimmunity Research (CEDAR) project is affiliated with the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics in the School of Medicine of the University of Colorado, Health Sciences Center. It is a project supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and will collect data for a total of five years. The principal investigator is Marian J. Rewers, MD, MPH, Ph.D. Other co-investigators include: Jill Norris, Ph.D.; George Eisenbarth, MD, Ph.D.; Ronald J. Sokol, MD; and Edward Hoffenberg, MD.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The goals of this study are primarily to investigate the genetic and environmental causes of celiac disease, through the determination of the prevalence of anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) in children considered to be at risk based on their family history (first degree relative) of either diabetes mellitus (Type I) or celiac disease or based on their HLA genotype (DR3) that is suspected to put them at an increased risk. The study is anticipating an enrollment of approximately 3,000 eligible children under the age of ten years. Most of the children reside in the Denver metro area, and a large proportion (approximately 40%) of the children involved with this research are concurrently enrolled in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY), which is run by the same principal investigator. The DAISY project is evaluating the presence of autoimmunity in relation to a pre-diabetic (insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) condition.

    The enrolled subjects are screened initially between the ages of two and five years of age with a serum sample tested using an IgA-based anti-endomysial antibody assay. The serum samples are also screened for IgA levels in order to rule out the potential for false negative results in IgA deficient children. For the subjects who are tested at a positive titration, follow-up includes a clinic evaluation and small bowel biopsy at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Department at the Childrens Hospital of Denver, Colorado. If a diagnosis of celiac is made, the subject is referred for nutritional counseling and follow-up serum testing is done six months after the diagnosis to confirm effective treatment. Dietary factors are also collected upon enrollment of the subjects, reflecting dietary changes that are made between the ages of one and two years of age, as the introduction of gluten into the diet usually occurs in this time frame. Information on family history of other autoimmune conditions is also collected. Subjects who test negative for the presence of anti-endomysial antibodies will be re-screened two years after their initial testing, to verify their immune status with respect to the anti-endomysial antibodies.

    By the end of the study period, we hope to have data that more accurately defines the prevalence of celiac disease in a United States population. The children recruited based on their HLA type are from a general population screening, and their data should be able to provide more accurate statistics on prevalence, and perhaps incidence, as some of these children have been followed since birth. We also hope to have identify associations with potential environmental exposures which may increase susceptibility to celiac disease.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I just wanted to respond anonymously to someone who posted on your website because I had and still have the same thing...(I think her name was nature girl) but I was 30 when I had a colonoscopy and they found many polyps, but I never did go back...I'm 44 now...have had intermittently blood in stool for years...

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/24/2012 - Tired of the standard choices for gluten-free pasta? If researchers at the University of Brazil have their way, you may soon be enlivening your current gluten-free choices with pasta made from the flour of green bananas.
    The researchers included Renata Puppin Zandonadi, PhD, Raquel Braz Assunção Botelho, PhD, Lenora Gandolfi, PhD, Janini Selva Ginani, MSc, Flávio Martins Montenegro, MSc, and Riccardo Pratesi, PhD.
    According to an article in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the team found a way to make pasta out of green banana flour. The flour is completely gluten-free, and the pasta compares favorably wi...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/19/2012 - In an effort to assess rising rates of celiac disease, and an increasing popularity of gluten-free food products, a team of researchers recently conducted a survey. The research team included Alberto Rubio-Tapia, Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Tricia L Brantner, Joseph A. Murray and James E. Everhart.
    Their data indicate that about 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, while another 1.4 million remain undiagnosed. Surprisingly, their results show that around 1.6 million people have adopted a gluten-free diet despite having no official diagnosis.
    Some of these people likely have celiac disease, while others likely belong to a l...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/01/2014 - At present, the number of reported celiac disease cases in China is extremely low, and celiac disease is considered to be rare in that country. To determine the accuracy of this perspective, a team of researchers recently set out to compile an accurate estimate of rates of celiac disease in China.
    The research team included Juanli Yuan, Jinyan Gao, Xin Li, Fahui Liu, Cisca Wijmenga, Hongbing Chen, and Luud J. W. J. Gilissen. They are variously affiliated with the State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and the School of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, at Nanchang University...