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  • Jefferson Adams

    The Gluten Intolerance Group Appoints SGS to Audit GFCO standards.

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Compliance company SGS tapped to test GFCO gluten-free standards.


    Photo: CC--COMSEVENTHFLT
    Caption: Photo: CC--COMSEVENTHFLT

    Celiac.com 07/27/2017 - The Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO) was founded in 2005 by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG) to offer independent certification to manufacturers of gluten-free products.

    GFCO certification is accredited to ISO 17065, and assures consumers with gluten sensitivities that a product meets the strict gluten-free standards. In most cases, GFCO standards exceed those of Codex, US, Canada, the EU and many other country standards for gluten-free products. For example, the GFCO guarantees that all products with its logo contain 10ppm or less of gluten.



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    The GFCO also confirms the validity of a manufacturer's gluten-free processes, and substantiates claims about the products.

    To ensure quality of Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO) standards, the GIG has retained New Jersey-based certification company SGS, whose inspection, verification, testing and certification services are globally respected for quality and integrity.

    According to SGS, the GFCO audits will either be combined with SGS' Food Safety certification audits, or conducted as a standalone service.

    Those seeking rigid gluten-free standards can look for the GFCO label on products labeled "gluten-free."

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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