Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • CPT B. Donald Andrasik
    CPT B. Donald Andrasik

    The Great Gluten-Free Debacle

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue

    The Great Gluten-Free Debacle - Image: CC--DVIDSHUB
    Caption: Image: CC--DVIDSHUB

    Celiac.com 06/02/2017 - Though I tried to avoid eating with locals, it seemed to come up over and over again. Military duties frequently required me to work and meet with the locals to facilitate contracts we had in place and ensure work was done properly. At various times and locations, I traveled with a small group of other soldiers among a larger population of Afghans. Many of the Afghans carried weapons, such as the AK-47, and had them slung over their shoulders. We were able to strike a chord with the locals, creating an atmosphere of camaraderie. The U.S. government was paying them to do a job; they were collecting a wage, and everyone left satisfied. At times, this relationship felt like any manager/employee relationship, and at other times it felt like we were paying the mafia to keep them from doing harm. The situation could be tough and would get tougher as our relationship with the locals became strained due to regional politics.

    An example of this strain occurred in February 2012, when a group of Afghan workers near Kabul (a few hundred miles away) were angered by the sight of Korans in a burn pile. The Koran is the religious text of Islam, which Muslims consider the word of God. An Arabic Koran is cared for in a special manner, and the sight of these sacred texts in a burn pit was enough to incite violence and riots throughout the country. Unlike the United States, where news travels instantly, news in Afghanistan travels slowly, mostly by word of mouth, and it took several days before Afghans in Kandahar heard about the incident. They began to protest, and we were all instructed to be on high alert with loaded weapons. Meanwhile, in Kabul, the riots took the lives of American soldiers. This included a friend of mine, a fellow Maryland Guardsmen and Army officer. He had been working with the Afghan National Army (ANA) in the Kabul region. Bob was a good man, and I will remember him fondly.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Work did not stop, even with the angry protests. Along with a small group of soldiers, I found myself at the local Kandahar Transshipment Yard, roughly two miles from the main post of KAF. The group of about twelve U.S. soldiers was there, mixed with over one hundred local Afghans and Pakistanis, most of whom were working as truck drivers delivering supplies. The atmosphere was abnormally quiet as we went about our business and talked with the Afghans. They stared at us but made no ill gestures as we walked up to them. Someone nearby started yelling. There was a scuffle. Silence followed. One of the locals stepped out from his group and walked over to me. He spoke no English but reached out his hand and offered me food. This seemed intended as a gesture of friendship. I could eat it and risk a variety of potential side effects to include a gluten reaction, or I could turn it down, which may have been considered an insult in what was already shaping up to be a tense situation.

    What do you do? I did what any leader would do, and made the best of the situation in spite of my diet. I imagine anyone would. Why risk violence just to avoid eating gluten? Yet the ramifications are clear for anyone considering joining military service. They may be putting themselves in a compromising position. Those of us out there make the best of it and do not mind the selfless service when required.

    Yet even at home in our day-to-day lives, where violence is not a factor, I see celiacs and gluten-free dieters compromising their dietary standards due to social pressures. Maybe they do it to fit in, or rub elbows with a supervisor at work, or maybe just to avoid seeming difficult. We may be given a salad with croutons and quietly brush them out of the way rather than be an inconvenience. And when we do this we are not only harming ourselves but each other. The more vocal celiacs are about their diet, the easier it will be for the next celiac who will follow in their footsteps, or are seated in the same restaurant later on.

    While it may seem curt, or perhaps crass, I politely reject any food that I am not confident is gluten-free, while ensuring that the server knows I am concerned about gluten. It does not matter to me if it is at a social event, a work event, or just casual dining. While I do know some gluten-free dieters who will only eat food from their own kitchen, I am not quite so stringent and am willing to go out to eat. However, I am also known for bombarding servers and cooks with a host of questions until I'm reasonably assured that my meal will not be cross contaminated or contain gluten. Several of the vignettes I include in Gluten Free in Afghanistan tell my story of difficult times eating gluten-free, both at home and abroad.

    While war-time scenarios do not unfold too often, and are probably far from your mind while eating at a restaurant, you may want to remember the above story when your gluten-free meal comes with wheat toast on top of it, or the crouton crumbs are scattered on top of your salad. Is it likely that the person who handed it to you is heavily armed and going to be offended? If they are, I would recommend you leave the area immediately for your safety and the safety of those around you. If they are likely not armed, politely explaining why this food is not healthy for gluten-free dieters will not only benefit you, it will benefit any celiac who is there after you. Stay safe out there.

    An excerpt from his book Gluten Free in Afghanistan.



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Thank you for your service and for touching on the subject that is so hard for me to explain to my loved ones. Eating out is such a social and common event that the fact that I'm not safe in an environment that is not completely in my control does not compute to my friends. I have gotten so sick now in restaurants that I thought were safe for me in the past that I AM going to be safe. I make dinner at my house or bring stuff over to a friend´s house and we have a meal together. More work but worth it.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This is a concerning article. A person's action depends on the gluten re-action. Is yours abdominal pain, headache or celiac dermatitis? Or is it of the extreme that includes 4 hours of repeated, explosive diarrhea. If I were recruited to the army, I'd probably be on my death bed within a month and definitely prior to deployment.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    CPT B. Donald Andrasik

    CPT B. Donald Andrasik is the author of Gluten-free in Afghanistan – A Soldier's Dietary Memoir, available on Celiac.com, Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Memorial Day is fast approaching. Once known as, "Decoration Day", Memorial Day commemorates the men and women who have died while serving their Country during military service. Not only is Memorial Day a day of remembrance, it is also a day to spend quality time with your family and loved ones. Most Memorial Day activities center around a picnic, BBQ, or sporting events, so get ready to have a gluten-free Memorial Day!
    If you are gluten sensitive, you will want to make sure your are included in the festivities by preparing gluten-free foods you can eat and share with others. Many of your favorite picnic and BBQ foods are naturally gluten-free, but the condiments and preparation of the dish is what can render your meal inedible. Remember to use gluten-free sauces for your marinades, and avoid using condiments that have been dipped into by gluten laden utensils, as cross contaminates are readily found in jars of mayonnaise and mustard. Keep yourself safe this year and make sure to have your own condiments when going to a group event. Many gluten sensitive people use squeeze tops for their condiments to avoid the proverbial "gluten contaminated knife in the condiments" routine. Included are some Memorial Day tips and recipes, but with a gluten-free twist.

    Gluten-Free Condiments and Marinades Hot Dogs are generally not gluten-free. The fillers they pump into hot dogs usually contain gluten or a sub-ingredient of gluten, such as caramel color, artificial colors or flavors, and even some spices. If you are a hot dog lover, don't despair, there are gluten-free hot dogs on the market. The link below is for all natural gluten-free buffalo hot dogs-check it out!
    Gluten-Free Hot Dogs Don't forget the buns! Being gluten-free doesn't mean you can't enjoy a bun like everyone else-just make sure your buns are gluten-free. You may want to abstain from grilling your buns on the BBQ if there are gluten products on the grill. Try toasting your buns in a clean toaster oven, or putting your buns on a piece of aluminum foil to avoid contamination. There are even some gluten-free buns on the market that are good enough to eat without toasting. The link below is a good place to start looking for gluten-free buns.
    Gluten-Free  Buns Shish kabobs are an all-time favorite at any Memorial Day event. Shish kabobs are easy to make and gluten-free; just make sure to use gluten-free soy sauce and marinades for your kabobs. Here are some ideas for home made, low-fat, gluten-free Shish kabobs.
    Gluten-Free Citrus Tarragon Chicken Kabobs
    1 lemon, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded 1 orange zested, then Juiced, remainder discarded 1 lime, zested, then juiced, remainder discarded 4 cloves fresh garlic, minced  1 tablespoon fresh tarragon leaves 1/4 cup gluten-free soy sauce 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 pound boneless, skinless gluten-free chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes (use free-range, organic chicken without fillers if possible).
    Gluten-Free Veggie Kabobs
    Bell peppers Onions Cherry tomatoes Mushrooms Italian squash Zuchinni Sweet potato chunks Tofu
    All of the above veggie kabob ideas are optional. Use foods that you like to grill. Make sure your veggies are chunked big enough to hold up well on kabob skewer.

    Gluten-Free Balsamic Vinaigrette (for veggie marinade)
    1/4 cup olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar salt and pepper to taste
    To Make Kabobs:
    Thoroughly mix together all of the citrus-tarragon chicken ingredients (except the chicken) in a bowl. Toss the chicken in the mixture until evenly coated. Cover and marinate in refrigerator for 2 hours. Cut vegetables into bite-size pieces. Puree balsamic basting vinaigrette ingredients in a blender for 30 seconds. Grill kabobs directly over heat source for about 10 to 15 minutes, turning 1/4 rotation every 2 to 3 minutes, or until it's cooked throughout. Gluten-Free Salads and Side Dishes:
    Salads are always a welcome gluten-free side dish, capable of complimenting any meal. To make your Memorial Day BBQ complete, here are some ideas for gluten-free side dishes. These side-dishes are gluten-free, easy and sure to be crowd pleasers-even for the gluten eating folks.
    Old Fashioned Hot German Potato Salad (Gluten-Free)
    Gluten-Free Fruit Salad Recipe
    Don't forget the gluten-free chips and snacks!
    Gluten-Free Chips Gluten-Free Snacks
    Being gluten-free doesn't  mean you can't enjoy a cold beer on Memorial day like everyone else. There are many beer companies that now make gluten-free options. There are quite a few really amazing gluten-free beers on the market, so you shouldn't have to settle for a gluten-free beer you don't like, though you may have to sample many gluten-free beers before you find one that suits your tastes. However, finding a market that carries your favorite gluten-free beer is another issue all together. You may want to discuss options with your favorite grocery store. Many stores will offer to carry products for you if they know you will buy them regularly. The following list of beers are some of the top sellers and can be found at many specialty stores, grocery stores, and liquor stores.Gluten-Free Beers:

    Greens Gluten-Free Beer Redbridge Gluten-Free Beer New Grist Gluten-Free Beer Gluten-Free desserts are certainly not sparse. Although, finding gluten-free, sugar-free, egg-free, dairy/casein-free, corn-free desserts are a bit trickier. Pecan pie is an all American favorite, and no Memorial Day should be without pecan pie. The following pecan pie recipe is raw, and requires no cooking, and contains almost none of the usual food allergens-unless of course you are allergic to pecans.
    Gluten-Free, Dairy/Casein-Free, Egg-Free, Corn-Free, Sugar-Free Pecan Pie
    Ingredients:
    2 cups raw almonds, soaked and drained 35 pitted dates, soaked for 1 hour and drained 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups raw pecans, soaked and drained pinch salt Olive oil, to grease your pan To Make:
    Note: If you are not familiar with the process of soaking nuts, please review the following information before attempting this recipe.
    Soaking Nuts and Seeds After soaking and drying the pecans complete the recipe as follows:
    Combine the almonds and 10 of the dates in a food processor, and process until they are coarsely ground and clumping together. Grease the bottom of a 9-inch square brownie pan or a pie plate with a little cold-pressed olive oil to keep the pie from sticking to the plate. Press the almond-and-date mixture evenly into the bottom of brownie pan and up the sides to form a crust. Set aside. Combine the remaining dates, the fresh lime juice, cinnamon, salt, and vanilla in a blender or small food processor, and process until the mixture has a smooth, uniform consistency. Spread the date filling evenly over the crust. Arrange the raw pecans on top of the date mixture and press lightly. Cut the pie into 2-inch squares and serve.
    Gluten-Free  Quick Check:
    Use a clean BBQ grill or use aluminum foil Use gluten-free condiments Make sure your meat is gluten-free Avoid cross contamination Prepare enough gluten-free food to share
    Happy Memorial Day!


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/08/2015 - The Israeli Defense Forces has announced plans to provide gluten-free meals for its troops with celiac disease.
    The IDF will soon provide its soldiers with gluten-free battle rations, which means that combat service will be an option for Israelis who suffer from celiac disease.
    Until last September, Israelis with celiac disease were exempted from army service, but permitted to volunteer in non-combat roles.
    That all changed in June, when Defense Minister Yaalon announced changes to the rules, which now permit soldiers with celiac disease to receive a 97 profile ranking, the highest possible, allowing them to join combat units.
    Currently, Israeli draft centers get about 250-300 people each year with celiac disease. So, while the overall numbers are small, the news is big to those affected, who can now get the gluten-free support they need to pursue full military careers, as they choose.
    Source:
    Jewish Press


    Yvonne Vissing Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 07/11/2016 - People with celiac disease know that going gluten free isn't a choice—it is a health necessity. It is also a human rights issue. Food and nutrition should be seen as a citizen's human and social right. People who fail to be attentive to the health needs of people with celiac disease may be violating their rights. Like many rights issues, people may not realize they've violated someone's rights by doing, or not doing, something. But when you are the one whose rights have been violated, you know. The violation is serious for you, even when others may be oblivious to the larger context of the violation. Thinking about being gluten-free in this context may be different from the way most people view celiac disease. But it is a point of view that is well worth considering.
    When you've got celiac disease and people aren't attentive to making sure you can eat gluten-free foods that are safely prepared and not contaminated, you can end up very sick in the short-run. The short-term effects may include symptoms such as gastrointestinal upset, migraines, fuzzy brain, sweats, and general malaise. As a fundamental right, what one eats should ensure people's access to a healthy, dignified and full life. People who have been "glutened" do not feel dignified as they writhe in pain, wrestle with fears of embarrassment, or modify their lifestyle and social schedules to accommodate the illness. In the long-run, if someone is continually exposed to gluten in foods, a variety of serious preventable health conditions may result. Unlike a peanut allergy that can directly kill you, exposure to gluten may result in morbidity and early mortality for people in an indirect fashion. Adhering to a gluten-free diet is of paramount importance to avoid health problems such as compromising one's weight and pubertal development, fertility, bone mineral density, and deficiencies of micro and macronutrients, not to mention the increased risk of developing malignancies, especially in the gastrointestinal system. Because the health effects of ingesting gluten for someone with celiac disease are less visible to those who don't experience them, they have been easier to ignore. Thanks to vocal advocates who now know that going gluten-free can save their lives, it is obvious that the lack of attention to making sure people can eat safely is a violation of their rights.
    Let's put the issue of gluten into a larger rights context. The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted in 1948 after World War II and it is the first global document that codified rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It contains a wide range of rights and is regarded as the foundation upon which other rights documents have been built. Its Article 25 states that "Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control" (www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/). The right to health and well-being are directly linked to food. Conditions like celiac disease, which are genetic in nature, are thus beyond one's control and necessary to be addressed through appropriate care and management.
    In another rights treaty document that pertains directly to the rights of children and youth, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) addresses in Article 3 that "In all actions concerning children….the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration", that individuals responsible for them are required to ensure that they receive the services and protections they need, particularly in the areas of safety (and) health…". Article 24 "recognizes the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. States Parties shall strive to ensure that no child is deprived of his or her right of access to such health care services". It goes on to emphasize the importance of disease prevention and primary health care "through the provision of adequate nutritious foods" (http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx). This implies that nutritious foods are linked with disease prevention and well-being, and making sure children (and adults) get the proper foods is in their best interests. If a child has celiac disease and the responsible adults are inattentive to making sure they can eat safely, they are in fact violating the child's rights. There are, then, international treaties that link food and nutrition directly with human rights.
    Juliana Nadal at the Department of Nutrition, Food Quality and Nutrition at the Federal University of Parana in Brazil reviews in her journal article, "The principle of human right to adequate food and celiac disease" (Demetra; 2013; 8(3); 411-423), a variety of ways that people who have celiac disease have their rights violated. Because celiac disease can be considered the most common food intolerance in the world, it is one that both individuals and social structures need to address as a mainstream issue. From how laws and consumer protections are designed at the macro level, to how food is made available and prepared at the micro level, rights of people with celiac disease hang in limbo. Some places and people are very attentive to their rights protections while others are not. Nadal contextualizes food and nutrition insecurity that afflicts individuals with celiac disease with specific regard to the principle of the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF).
    Diet is the single most secure treatment form for people with celiac disease. Managing one's diet enables one to control the magnitude of the disease. Laws, standards, practices and policies are necessary to secure HRAF for people with celiac disease. It is therefore important that the public be educated regarding this. By protecting individual fundamental human right to food availability in both quantity and quality, it reflects the value of society to protect the welfare of this group of people. Ultimately, rights protections promote and improve the health of the entire population.
    Rights violations may also be seen through the limited availability of products intended for celiac individuals in the market. Whether looking at gluten-free food as a local, state, regional, national or global issue, there are certain countries and areas that do not have access to the same quantity and variety of gluten-free foods as in other areas. Online shopping may make it easier for some people to access foods they need, but this option is not necessarily available to everyone. If foods essential for good diets are not accessible, this forces people to make dietary compromises that may not be in their best interest.
    Another area of rights violations for people who have to go gluten-free is the high cost of products. Simply put, gluten-free foods tend to cost more than other foods. People who have celiac disease have to use more of their scarce dollars to pay for food. This means there is less money available to pay for other necessities. Because gluten-free foods tend to be more expensive, this creates a social class barrier, especially for poor people or financially-strapped people with celiac disease. Poorer people will have their right to safe nutrition compromised because they can't afford the same foods as more affluent people who have celiac disease.
    The issue of gluten contamination contributes to a constant situation of food and nutritional insecurity to holders of this special dietary need. The celiac diet must be completely gluten-free, which allows people to have a life relatively free of major pathological complications. Maintaining a totally gluten-free diet is not an easy task because the violation of the diet may occur voluntarily or involuntarily, and range from incorrect information on food labels to the gluten contamination of processed products. Difficulties in the availability and access to food without gluten violates the principle of the human right to adequate food. The condition of being a celiac individual exposes one to permanent food and nutrition insecurity, which could cause loss of quality of life, socialization, and health of the individual, both in the short and long term.
    The problematic situation of food and nutritional insecurity that afflicts individuals with celiac disease can productively be addressed with regard to the principle of the human right to adequate food (HRAF) from the perspective of Food and Nutrition Security (FNS). It is important to know and recognize the real need of the people who live in some way under threat of food insecurity, how it impacts their health and lifestyle. Constructing, implementing and improving health policies in order to meet their needs is imperative to provide access to adequate food of nutritional quality. and to ensure that food, biological, social and cultural needs are achieved.
    By understanding food as a basic human right, it is easy to understand that the absence of safe foods that address the needs of celiac individuals represents a concrete case of a group of people who often may have their rights to adequate nutrition violated. As a result, many live in a state of food and nutrition insecurity. Food must be viewed as a constitutional right of all citizens, including those with special needs which require a special diet.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/24/2017 - Coming from homes where gluten-free food is abundant and taken for granted, many college students struggle with maintaining their diets during their time on campus.
    That struggle is the focus of numerous efforts by campuses nationwide to provide solid, reliable and abundant gluten-free food options for their students.
    At a place like SMU, that can include kitchen dining halls that serve gluten-free foods, or gluten-free pantry in Umphrey Lee.
    To help students be more conscious about their food choices SMU posts the daily menus on its website, along with nutritional facts for each item. There are different icons such as Eat Well, Fat Free, Low Sodium, Vegetarian, and Vegan, but as yet, no Gluten-Free icon.
    SMU does offer students access to a campus dietitian, who can help them figure out how to eat a balanced diet on campus, and grant them access to the gluten-free pantry or help in special cases.
    Read more at: smudailycampus.com.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/01/2017 - Calgary University's Faculty of Arts and Markin Undergraduate Student Research program is designed to give recipients a leg up on research projects that can help advance their academic goals.
    For one such recipient, Karen Tang, those goals include helping individuals "to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies." For Tang, the opportunity allows her to combine her interests of psychology and self-compassion with her desire to help chronic disease populations.
    For those coping with celiac disease, strategies such as self-compassion can be an effective tool for managing their well-being.
    Tang has been heavily involved in the pilot study for the Promotion of Optimal Well-Being, Education and Regulation for Celiac Disease (POWER-C). The study is the first program specifically designed to teach individuals evidence-based strategies for coping with celiac disease and to help them effectively manage their illness.
    Tang has spent the fall and winter committed to helping individuals with celiac disease effectively manage their illness, to enhance their health and their quality of life. For many, a strict lifestyle change comes with its own set of problems and challenges. Research indicates that approximately less than 42 per cent of individuals with celiac disease adhere strictly to a gluten-free diet.
    Tang says, "The purpose of this research is to help individuals to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies."
    Ms. Tang presented an update on her research at a mini-symposium on April 7, 2017.
    Read More at Calgary University's UToday


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/24/2017 - Are many non-celiac gluten-free eaters actually treating undiagnosed medical conditions? Is the gluten-free movement less a fad than we imagine?
    Currently, about 3 million Americans follow a gluten-free diet, even though they do not have celiac disease. Known colloquially as "PWAGs," people without celiac disease avoiding gluten. These folks are often painted as fad dieters, or hypochondriacs, or both.
    Call them what you will, their ranks are growing. According to a study in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the number of PWAGs tripled from 2009 to 2014, while the number of celiac cases stayed flat. A new study from the Mayo Clinic supports these conclusions. The study derived from data gathered in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, as well as serological tests.
    There is also a growing body of data that support the existence of non-celiac gluten sensitivities, though the evidence is not conclusive. Moreover, researchers really don't have any idea how many non-celiacs on a gluten-free diet may have legitimate reactions to gluten. The phenomenon has emerged in the past five years in medical literature.
    For a long time, researchers just assumed that only people with celiac disease would eat a gluten-free diet. About a decade ago, when research into celiac disease and gluten-free dieting began in earnest, says Joseph Murray, a celiac researcher at the Mayo Clinic and an author of the new research, researchers "didn't think to ask why people avoid gluten. When we designed this study 10 years ago, no one avoided gluten without a celiac diagnosis."
    The latest research by Murray and his colleagues showed that the total number of celiac cases leveled off in the last few years, while more non-celiacs began to avoid gluten for different reasons. Researchers still aren't sure what's driving the trend, and whether it will continue. Part of the increase is doubtless to growing awareness of gluten sensitivity.
    However, Benjamin Lebwohl, the director of clinical research at Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center, estimates that more than half of the 3.1 million PWAGs noted in this latest study have legitimate gluten sensitivity. "An increasing number of people say that gluten makes them sick, and we don't have a good sense why that is yet," Lebwohl said. "There is a large placebo effect — but this is over and above that."
    Non-celiac patients with gluten sensitivity often complain of symptoms similar to those of celiacs, such as intestinal problems, fatigue, stomachaches and mental fogginess. And while researchers don't know the reason, clinical studies have shown that these symptoms are often relieved by eliminating dietary gluten.
    One theory that is gaining some credence is that these people may be sensitive to other irritants, such as FODMAPS, a class of carbohydrates shown to cause gastrointestinal symptoms found in wheat, milk, onions and cheese.
    Look for more studies into this topic, as researchers seek to nail down answers about celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity, and similar symptoms in non-celiacs.
    Meantime, the number of people who suspect they have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and who seek improvement in their symptoms by eliminating gluten from their diets, continues to grow.
     Source:
    DailyTribune.com


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...