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    Scott Adams

    Trace Amounts of Gluten Acceptable in the Treatment of Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Volume 19 Issue 12 Page 1277 - June 2004



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    Celiac.com 06/28/2004 – According to celiac disease researchers gluten contamination in gluten-free products cannot be totally avoided. With this in mind they set out to determine the safe threshold of gluten in the diets of those with celiac disease. To determine this level they measured the gluten content of 59 naturally gluten-free and 24 Codex quality wheat starch-based gluten-free products using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The daily intake of flours was calculated in 76 adults on gluten-free diets and was then compared with their biopsies (mucosal histology). The researchers found that 13 of the 59 naturally gluten-free products and 11 of 24 Codex quality wheat starch-based gluten-free products contained gluten in the amount of 20 to 200 ppm (=mg/kg). The average flour intake for the group was 80g, and this ranged between 10g at the low end, and 300g on the high end.

    The researchers conclude that the threshold for gluten in the diets of those with celiac disease can safely be set at 100 ppm. Even those in the study who consumed flour at the high end--300g per day with a gluten level of 100 ppm--only consumed 30mg of gluten per day. The researchers determined that this level was safe when correlated to their histology in both clinical and challenge studies. Last, this level can be achieved by the food industry, will not make the diet too cumbersome, and will have the additional benefit of encouraging additional food companies to get into the gluten-free food market.

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    I work in food production company. We have requests from people with celiac disease to label our products with or without gluten.

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    Does this mean that products produced in a factory which also produces gluten products but has good practices of cleaning between runs would be okay to eat? Or are the potential traces of gluten going to be a problem for celiacs in these cases?

     

    It will be great when the all the food labeling really reflects if a product is gluten free enough to eat.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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