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  • Jefferson Adams

    Tri-Tip Steak with Red Wine Sauce (Gluten-Free)

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Simple gluten-free wine sauce helps a cheap steak stand out.


    Easy gluten-free red wine sauce helps steak stand out. Photo: CC--Dale Cruse
    Caption: Easy gluten-free red wine sauce helps steak stand out. Photo: CC--Dale Cruse

    Celiac.com 08/08/2017 - A simple red wine sauce helps cheaper cuts of beef go the distance and deliver the win. This recipe dresses up a tri-tip steak into a tasty, easy to make meal that you won’t soon forget.

    Ingredients:

    • 2 (1-pound) tri-tip steaks
    • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for garnish
    • 6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
    • 1 onion, thinly sliced
    • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
    • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
    • ⅓ cup tomato paste
    • 2½ cups red wine



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    Directions:
    Heat grill or barbecue to medium-high.

    Sprinkle the steaks with salt and pepper and drizzle with the 3 tablespoons of olive oil.

    Grill about 3-4 minutes per side for medium-rare.

    Transfer the steaks to a cutting board.

    Tent with foil and let rest 10 minutes.

    Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat.

    Add the onions and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes.

    Season with salt.

    Add the garlic and oregano and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

    Stir in the tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly.

    Whisk in the wine.

    Simmer until the sauce reduces by half, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes.

    Remove the skillet from the heat.

    Strain the sauce into a small bowl, pressing on the solids to extract as much liquid as possible.

    Discard the solids in the strainer and return the sauce to the saucepan and bring back to a slow simmer.

    Cut the remaining 4 tablespoons of butter into small chunks and whisk into the sauce little by little.

    Season the sauce with salt and pepper.

    Thinly slice the steaks across the grain.

    Divide the steak slices among 6 plates.

    Drizzle the sauce over the steak, drizzle a little more extra-virgin olive oil and serve.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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