Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Scott Adams

    Tryptophan in Turkey Meat Can Speed Gut Healing in Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
    2 2
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Just in time for Thanksgiving, a study shows that tryptophan in turkey meat, along with antibiotics, can speed healing and improve response to a gluten-free diet in celiacs.


    Turkey meat contains high levels of tryptophan. Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--stevevoght
    Caption: Turkey meat contains high levels of tryptophan. Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--stevevoght

    Celiac.com 10/28/2020 - Eating that Thanksgiving turkey and taking probiotics may promote gut healing and improve gluten-free diet response in people with celiac disease.

    A research team at Canada's McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid found in high concentrations in turkey meat, along with some probiotics, may help celiacs heal faster, and respond better to a gluten-free diet.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The researchers included Bruno Lamas, Leticia Hernandez-Galan, Heather J. Galipeau, Marco Constante, Alexandra Clarizio, Jennifer Jury, Natalia M. Breyner, Alberto Caminero, Gaston Rueda, Christina L. Hayes, Justin L. McCarville, Miriam Bermudez Brito, Julien Planchais, Nathalie Rolhion, Joseph A. Murray, Philippe Langella, Linda M. P. Loonen, Jerry M. Wells, Premysl Bercik, Harry Sokol, and Elena F. Verdu.

    For their study, the team set out to see if the breakdown of tryptophan by gut bacteria was different in celiac disease, and whether this difference could be targeted as a potential therapy. The team studied three groups: patients with active celiac disease, patients two years after a gluten-free diet, and healthy people.

    Their findings suggest targeting tryptophan metabolism in the guts of people with celiac disease might help to control symptoms and accelerate intestinal healing.

    "The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, which is difficult to follow, and doesn't always lead to complete recovery of the gut or symptom resolution," says Elena Verdu, lead researcher of the study and a professor of medicine at McMaster's Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute. She also holds the Canada Research Chair in Nutrition, Inflammation and Microbiota.

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that is necessary for numerous functions within the body, but which cannot be produced by the body, and instead must be consumed via foods like poultry, chocolate, bananas, and cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. Once consumed, tryptophan is broken down by gut bacteria to produce bioactive molecules (called "metabolites") that interact with receptors in the gut lining that control inflammation. One of these receptors is the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, or AhR, and suboptimal activation of this receptor has been implicated in chronic intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Celiacs showed evidence of reduced bacterial metabolism of tryptophan, and their gut microbiota did not appropriately stimulate the AhR pathway, which controls inflammation and protects the gut barrier. These changes improved a bit in patients after two years of a gluten-free diet. Using mice that express the genes for celiac disease, the authors showed that two strains of lactobacilli, bacteria known to breakdown tryptophan, activated AhR and reduced gluten-triggered inflammation.

    The study findings highlight the potential therapeutic value of targeting tryptophan metabolism in the gut in celiac disease to better control symptoms.

    Hopefully, we will get studies that look into therapeutic strategies, such as tryptophan supplementation in combination with specific probiotics, that produce AhR ligands from the diet, in celiac patients who do not respond to the gluten-free diet.

    Read more in Science Translational Medicine

     

    The researchers are variously affiliated with the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; the Université Paris-Saclay, INRAE, AgroParisTech, Micalis Institute, Jouy-en-Josas, France; the Sorbonne Université, Inserm, Centre de Recherche Saint-Antoine, CRSA, AP-HP, Hospital Saint Antoine, Service de Gastroenterologie, Paris, France; the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; and the Host-Microbe Interactomics, Animal Sciences Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.

    Edited by Scott Adams

    2 2

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    To All,

    Here is research from "Frontiers in Immunology" that support this new understanding of how Tryptophan might be helpful as a therapeutic in Celiac's.

    Entitled "To Be or Not to Be a Pathogen: Candida albicans and Celiac Disease" but I would subtitle it...

    "The Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways: New Players in celiac disease" read down in the article and talks about how Tryptophan metabolism plays a role in Celiac Disease...

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6906151/

    It is explains it well for those who like to "get in the weeds" and read the research for themselves.

    This is exactly what you would suspect if Niacin was involved in Leaky Gut Syndrome.

    Earlier research lined out how the Oxidative Stress of low Niacin levels could treat Intestinal Permeability IE Leaky Guts in Alcoholics

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16713031/

    Those who eat diets with a lot of HFCS in their diet can metabolically trigger the same effects as an Alcoholic with excessive drinking.

    See this research entitled "Fructose: It's “Alcohol Without the Buzz”"

    https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/4/2/226/4591631

    I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

    Posterboy,

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I'm all in on the tryptophan.  This is just my experience but I started taking 5-HTP supplements recently for an on-going headache problem that was finally traced back to a serotonin imbalance.  As soon as I started taking the 5-HTP to help the serotonin issue, the headaches stopped almost immediately and I haven't had one in over 2 months.  (This is after 18 months of near daily migraines and about 6 different non-effective migraine prescriptions over that span).  But I've also noticed that my appetite almost doubled once I started taking the 5-HTP and I've been able to eat some stuff recently that usually bothers my stomach, although I haven't tested any gluten-specific foods.  But usually sugar and alcohol also kill my stomach and I've been able to dabble a little bit with those recently with no effects.  The increase in my appetite the first few weeks taking them was by far the biggest thing I noticed.  I haven't been able to eat the way I ate those first 2 weeks without causing problems in years.  So totally anecdotal but my stomach has been feeling a decent amount better in the 2 months on the 5-HTP.  I kind of assumed it had something to do with the serotonin since an imbalance in serotonin will supposedly effect your digestion and sleep patterns (my 2 biggest problems).  But maybe the tryptophan helps with the gluten inflammation too like this article suggests.  Or perhaps it is all related and serotonin is connected in some way to celiac and gut health.  Who knows?  It seems to be helping me at the moment though.  Yay tryptophan!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, DevilGluten said:

    I'm all in on the tryptophan.  This is just my experience but I started taking 5-HTP supplements recently for an on-going headache problem that was finally traced back to a serotonin imbalance.  As soon as I started taking the 5-HTP to help the serotonin issue, the headaches stopped almost immediately and I haven't had one in over 2 months.  (This is after 18 months of near daily migraines and about 6 different non-effective migraine prescriptions over that span).  But I've also noticed that my appetite almost doubled once I started taking the 5-HTP and I've been able to eat some stuff recently that usually bothers my stomach, although I haven't tested any gluten-specific foods.  But usually sugar and alcohol also kill my stomach and I've been able to dabble a little bit with those recently with no effects.  The increase in my appetite the first few weeks taking them was by far the biggest thing I noticed.  I haven't been able to eat the way I ate those first 2 weeks without causing problems in years.  So totally anecdotal but my stomach has been feeling a decent amount better in the 2 months on the 5-HTP.  I kind of assumed it had something to do with the serotonin since an imbalance in serotonin will supposedly effect your digestion and sleep patterns (my 2 biggest problems).  But maybe the tryptophan helps with the gluten inflammation too like this article suggests.  Or perhaps it is all related and serotonin is connected in some way to celiac and gut health.  Who knows?  It seems to be helping me at the moment though.  Yay tryptophan!

    DevilGluten,

    I quoted this research in a thread about this topic but not in this article.

    I am posting it here now for you and others who come across this article to read.

    Earlier research that is 5+ years old showed now showed how Tryptophan is important,......ney they say "Essential" for the Pathogenesis of IBS.

    Here it is I hope it is helpful.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4266036/

    The reason you probably found 5HTP helpful is you were replacing the 5 HTP your body was no longer making because your were low in Tryptophan to begin with...

    See this diagram that shows how our bodies use Tryptophan to make 5 HTP and ultimately serotonin that you were low in!

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=%2bzrkESWf&id=3E25631C5E5D70056E2D62570C76983DAEB31616&thid=OIP.-zrkESWf-cGbpsIVqu0DEAHaEU&mediaurl=http%3a%2f%2fmyalgan.co.uk%2fuploads%2fimages%2ftryptophan-5htp-serotonin-large.jpg&exph=700&expw=1200&q=5-htp+and+tryptophan&simid=608055584327139522&ck=51F543E0BCF4B247F24E76E500E52EF7&selectedIndex=7&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0

    Most importantly our body uses the Amino AcidTryptophan to synthesize 80% of our Niacin requirement. And in part why it is considered an "Essential" Amino Acid.....there is that word Essential again.....

    Low Tryptophan leads to low Niacin status...which leads to low Stomach Acid!

    See this abstract about how taking Niacin(amide) can help treat digestive issues.

    http://www.yourhealthbase.com/database/niacin-treats-digestive-problems.htm

    I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

    Posterboy,

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Alexander R. Shikhman, MD, PhD, FACR
    Celiac.com 04/09/2014 - The human gastrointestinal tract contains approximately 1014 bacterial cells that form a unique, diverse and very dynamic microbial ecosystem also known as gut microbiota. The genomes of all intestinal microbes form the “microbiome”, representing more than 100 times the human genome. The composition of gut microbiota is crucial for human health. Normal gut microbiota enhances digestive processes, produces certain vitamins and nutrients, facilitates absorptive processes, participates in development and maturation of the immune system and limits colonization of the gut by pathogenic microorganisms. It has been demonstrated that the...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/01/2017 - More and more evidence shows a connection between gut inflammation and type 1 diabetes (T1D). A team of researchers recently set out to assess gut inflammatory profiles and microbiota in patients with T1D, and to compare them with healthy controls (CTRL) and with celiac disease patients as gut inflammatory disease controls.
    The research team included Silvia Pellegrini, Valeria Sordi, Andrea Mario Bolla, Diego Saita Roberto Ferrarese, Filippo Canducci, Massimo Clementi, Francesca Invernizzi, Alberto Mariani, Riccardo Bonfanti, Graziano Barera, Pier Alberto Testoni, Claudio Doglioni, Emanuele Bosi, and Lorenzo Piemonti. They are...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/28/2018 - Beyond a few teaser studies, we don’t know enough about whether the individual micro-biome might play a role in the development of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease.
    Top celiac researcher Alessio Fasano, together with colleague G. Serena, recently presented an overview of current knowledge regarding the contribution of the individual micro-biome to celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Their discussion includes a particular focus on how probiotics may be used as potential preventive therapy for CIDs.
    They are both affiliated with the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center and Division o...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 11/02/2020 - Many people with celiac disease experience persistent symptoms despite adhering to the gluten-free diet. Different studies have assessed the use of probiotics as an adjuvant treatment for celiac disease. 
    A team of researchers recently set out to to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics in improving gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients with celiac disease, and used EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, CENTRAL, and DARE databases to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating probiotics compared with placebo for treating celiac disease, before February 2019. 
    The researchers co...