Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Unvaccinated Celiac Patients Face Higher Pneumonia Risk

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Vaccines can help protect celiac disease patients from pneumonia. Photo: CC--Helge V. Keitel

    Celiac.com 06/22/2016 - Doctors generally recommend that celiac disease patients receive pneumococcal vaccination, but little has been done to quantify risk levels.

    A team of researchers recently set out to quantify the risk of community-acquired pneumonia among patients with celiac disease, assessing whether vaccination against streptococcal pneumonia modified this risk. The research team included F. Zingone, A. Abdul Sultan, C. J. Crooks, L. J. Tata, C. Ciacci & J. West. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Epidemiology and PublicHealth, University of Nottingham, CityHospital, Nottingham, UK, and with the Coeliac center within the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Salerno in Salerno, Italy.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Their team identified all patients with celiac disease within the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked with English Hospital Episodes Statistics between April 1997 and March 2011 and up to 10 controls per patient with celiac disease frequency matched in 10-year age bands.

    They calculated absolute rates of community-acquired pneumonia for patients with celiac disease compared to controls stratified by vaccination status and time of diagnosis using Cox regression in terms of adjusted hazard ratios (HR). They found 1,864 first community-acquired pneumonia events among the 101,755 control patients, and 179 among the 9,803 celiac patients.

    Overall, absolute rates of pneumonia were similar, with celiac patients at 3.42, and control subjects at 3.12 per 1000 person-years respectively (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.91–1.24). However, they found a 28% increased risk of pneumonia in unvaccinated celiac disease subjects compared to unvaccinated control subjects (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.02–1.60).

    Interestingly, this increased risk was limited to those younger than 65, was highest around the time of diagnosis and was maintained for more than 5 years after diagnosis. Only 26.6% underwent vaccination after their celiac disease diagnosis.

    Unvaccinated celiac patients under the age of 65 have an excess risk of community-acquired pneumonia that was not seen in vaccinated celiac patients. More patients with celiac disease need to be vaccinated to protect them from pneumonia.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/14/2013 - Sweden has seen a sharp rise in cases of celiac disease in children under two years of age. A research team recently studied the possible connection between early infections and celiac disease, along with their possible role in the explosion of celiac cases in Swedish children.
    The research team included Anna Myléus, Olle Hernell, Leif Gothefors, Marie-...

    Jefferson Adams
    A team of researchers recently took a look at how well the hepatitis B vaccine protected people with celiac disease over time. Specifically, they evaluated what is called long-term antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiac patients vaccinated as adolescents.
    The research team included F. Zingone, F. Morisco, A. Zanetti, L. Romanò, G. Portella,...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/17/2015 - In an interesting update, researcher Giuseppe Mazzarella, of the Immuno-Morphology Lab at the Institute of Food Sciences of the National Council Research in Avellino, Italy recently set out to examine the role of effector and suppressor T cells in celiac.
    Celiac disease is a T-cell-mediated immune disorder in which gliadin-derived peptides activate lamina...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    Hello everyone,            I went gluten free before 6 months after 2 years of many symptoms. I am not celiac, biopsy revealed chronic inflammation. I tested positive for SIBO but decided not to take antibiotics for it as I was not co...
    Thank you, I appreciate the feedback. When I initially saw my GI doctor I only had the GLIADIN results back which she said was outdated lab and unreliable. Without having GI symptoms and no anemia she completly wrote off Celiac until my other...
    The other thing to take into account is that it's not just you learning, it's the people that live with you. You will make mistakes in the beginning and that's with you being celiac. Other people don't even think about cross contamination...
×
×
  • Create New...