Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jefferson Adams

    Using HLA Alleles to Stratify Celiac Disease Risk Levels

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 10/02/2009 - A team of researchers led by Michelle M. Pietzak, M.D., of the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles, recently conducted a large-scale study to identify HLA-DQ haplotypes most connected with increased risk of celiac disease.

    Their results show that for people with elevated risk factors for celiac disease, it is in fact possible to stratify risk based on HLA-DQ genotype, according to results of the study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The research team analyzed blood samples from 10,191 subjects with elevated risk for celiac disease due to clear clinical symptoms, an affected family member, or the presence of other conditions associated with celiac disease.

    They found that eight major genotype groups commonly tested positive for anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A. They also noted a steady progression of elevated risk rising from 2.11 percent for DQ8 heterozygotes up to 28.28 percent for DQ2.2+DQ7.5 homozygotes.

    Additionally, they discovered that the relative risk for anti-endomysial immunoglobulin A positivity of DQ8 homozygous:heterozygous was about the same as DQ2 homozygous:DQ2.5 heterozygous samples, with an odds ratio of about 4.0 for each.

    Based on the results, the team concludes that the information might "further quantify the relationship between the expression of celiac disease-associated heterodimers and the occurrence of celiac disease, aid in characterizing previously indeterminate cases, and potentially avoid intestinal biopsies when used in combination with highly sensitive and specific serology."

    The add that "targeting these high-risk alleles might aid the design of peptide immuno-therapeutic strategies to augment the gluten-free diet."

    Prometheus Laboratories underwrote the study, and all study authors work or consult for the company.

    Source:
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - September, 2009.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    must be a typo here, should be DQ2,2+DQ7,5 in this line: "heterozygotes up to 28.28 percent for DQ2.5/DQ2.2+2.5 homozygotes." (DQ2,2+DQ7,5 together make up trans-DQ2,5)

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Wahab PJ, Meijer JW, Mulder CJ.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rijnstate Hospital Arnhem, The Netherlands.
    Am J Clin Pathol 118(3):459-463, 2002
    Celiac.com 10/28/2002 - The following study strongly supports follow-up care and testing for people with celiac disease. As the study found, over 10% of people with diagnosed celiac disease have still not fully recovered even after five years of treatment.
    To assess histologic recovery in response to gluten withdrawal in celiac disease, 158 patients seen in our hospital during a 15-year period underwent follow-up small intestine biopsies (SIBs) within 2 years after starting a gluten...

    Scott Adams
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jan;100(1):177-85
    Celiac.com 06/30/2005 – In order to determine whether celiac disease mucosal lesions may have a patchy distribution that would require more than one biopsy sample to make an accurate celiac disease diagnosis, Italian researchers closely examined the detailed biopsies taken from 112 consecutively diagnosed children. All of the children in the study had positive anti-endomysium (EMA) or anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) antibodies, and each underwent an upper GI endoscopy in which 4-5 biopsies were taken from Treitz and/or distal duodenum, intermediate duodenum, proximal duodenum, and the duodenal b...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether new serology assays can detect gluten sensitivity among enteropathy patients seronegative for anti–tissue transglutaminase.
    Emilia Sugai, Hui Jer Hwang, Horacio Vázquez, Edgardo Smecuol, Sonia Niveloni, Roberto Mazure, Eduardo Mauriño, Pascale Aeschlimann, Walter Binder, Daniel Aeschlimann and Julio C. Bai comprised the research team.
    They are variously affiliated with the Small Bowel Section of the Department of Medicine at C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Matrix Biology and Tissue Repair Research Unit at the...

    Melissa Reed
    Celiac.com 08/10/2014 - Gluten comes from the Latin word for glue. It is a protein in wheat and other grains. It will elicit an autoimmune response in celiacs. Other grains like barley, rye and spelt contain gluten as well. In wheat products, the difficult part for celiacs to digest is gliadin. Some fad diets may try to claim glaidin is new, but it is not, and to dispel another myth there isn’t any wheat on the market that is genetically modified.
    Celiac diease isn't diagnosed as often as it should be. In turn, individuals suffer with it for years, not knowing what to do or how to feel better. Celiac disease is often misdiagnosed for different ailments t...