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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    View's Elisabeth Hasselbeck Shares Gluten-free Odyssey in New Book

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 05/06/2009 - Like so many people with celiac disease, Elisabeth Hasselbeck of ABC's The View has a story to tell. Like so many people with celiac disease, that story involves a long, slow, painful journey from suffering to understanding, to self-empowerment and recovery. In between were periods of confusion, doubt, isolation and malaise. Hasselbeck describes that journey in her new book: The gluten-free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide.

    The G-FreeDiet:A Gluten-Free Survival GuideHasselbeck's odyssey began during her sophomore year of college, when she fell ill after returning from a three-week-long trip to Belize. She was diagnosed with a severe bacterial intestinal infection which, her doctor said, was a result of her travels in Central America. The illness put in the school infirmary for nearly a week, with an immensely distended belly and a 103+ fever. Once the initial infection subsided, she was naturally relieved, and thought the worst was over. Little did she know that a long road lay ahead.

    As an athlete, Hasselbeck was eager to get back into shape after she was discharged. Her body had other ideas. During this period, she says she felt absolutely ravenous, yet the only dining hall foods that seemed appealing were soft-serve vanilla frozen yogurt and Rice Krispies. Food had lost its appeal.

    Hasselbeck grew up in an Italian-American neighborhood in Providence, RI, in a family that prized all things bread and pasta, so she wasn't about to give up the appetite and food battle without a fight.

    However, no matter what she ate nothing satisfied her hunger—and everything seemed to upset her stomach. After nearly every meal, she had the classic bloating, and sharp, gassy pains in her gut that are all too familar to most celiacs. Cramps, indigestion and diarrhea were familiar companions; sometimes all at once. Often, she would become too tired to move.

    It was about this time that she became a contestant on Survivor: The Australian Outback. While enduring the trials of surviving in the outback, Hasselbeck was deprived of her normal, gluten-rich American diet, and forced to subsist on things she would never willingly eat at home. Yet, her symptoms were gone, and she had never felt better. Once she returned to the U.S., she narrowed the scope of her quest. She eliminated nearly everything from her diet and introduced items one at a time.

    After nearly forty days basically starving herself, she sought solace in her pre-Australia diet, with dire consequences. After the joy of knowing a healthy, happy gut for the first time in years, she suddenly found herself feeling worse than ever, and spending days in her room, bedridden, save for urgent trips to the bathroom.

    She saw a doctor and received a diagnosis of "irritable bowel syndrome." Suspicious of what she saw as an acknowledgement of symptoms masquerading as a diagnosis, she began to look for connections on her own.

    Fortunately for Hasselbeck, she began to make a connection between the illness she had suffered for so long and the food she was eating. She noticed that when ate starchy foods, her symptoms returned with a vengeance.

    An Internet search told her that she might be suffering an adverse reaction to wheat. She quickly moved to eliminate wheat from her diet. Her experience, as so many with celiac disease know all too well, was an educational one, filled with occasional episodes that left her feeling inexplicably ill.

    Unable to figure out exactly what was making her sick, she undertook more research and stumbled upon some information about gluten intolerance and celiac disease.

    In 2002, after five years of suffering, Hasselbeck diagnosed diagnosed herself with celiac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

    Elizabeth Hasselbeck is Gluten-FreeCeliac disease can cause acute damage to the small intestine and the digestive system, and, left untreated, it can leave sufferers at risk for certain types of cancer and other associated conditions. The only known treatment is a lifelong diet free from wheat rye and barley gluten. Once she realized what had been tormenting her for so many long, she set about eliminating all wheat, barley, oats, and rye from her diet.

    Still, even after she made her diagnosis, she faced a long line of skeptical doctors. In fact, it was eight years after her symptoms first began until she found a doctor who was willing to listen, and who had answers.

    Her move  to New York City put her into contact with Dr. Peter Green, the director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, who confirmed what she'd suspected for years: Elisabeth Hasselbeck has celiac disease. After waiting for years for a sensible explanation to her symptoms, Dr. Green was the first doctor to look for the cause, not simply to treat the symptoms. Despite the same mistakes and accidents that most of us celiacs have also experienced, her perseverance paid off in the end and she remains gluten-free to this day.

    You can watch Elisabeth Hasselbeck daily on ABC.com's The View. Hasselbeck's book is now available at Celiac.com.

    Source: ABC News


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    WOW! First I must say most of the people that have left comments here are NO DOUBT, miserable hating people, maybe that's why you don't feel well. Elisabeth has brought awareness to people such as myself. I would have never known about Celia disease. THANK YOU ELISABETH.

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    Guest Cheryl Patton Gantt

    Posted

    Elisabeth, I have been in agony for a long time with, irritable bowel syndrome, I knew I had celiac but the doctors would not listen. This past week I had an upper endoscopy and a colonoscopy - before this a blood test confirmed celiac FINALLY!!! In 2006 and last week 6-22-09 both upper endoscopies did not show it however, the surgeons told me right after the scope. It looks like they would have to send something off to a lab to be cultured or tested??? The only reason I found out that a previous blood test confirmed it was I was there on 6-10-09, they drew blood, then my surgeon went out of town! So...another surgeon did my scopes. As he was telling me that he didn't find celiac and he was flipping through my chart - I saw the lab result underlined!!!! Well, I called the nurses attention to it and the surgeon was already busy so I have to wait until 7-30-09 to talk to my regular MD about it!!! This is so frustrating! My taste buds have gone and I crave only sweet stuff that I shouldn't eat - like honey buns and I eat - get this a lot of oatmeal!! I am recently divorced and have no time for myself - had to take time off work to get scopes. I knew oats weren't good but it is quick and I get up @ 4 am to go to work. I hope I can get your book. Thank you if you do read this.

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    Guest Brittney Daniel

    Posted

    Thank goodness for celebrities, such as Elisabeth Hasselbeck, who are willing to share their private struggles and ailments for the sake of all who suffer a similar fate. They clearly risk much by doing so in our media-frenzy society. I'm puzzled by some of the negative, anti-Elisabeth comments, however. Bitterness, jealousy and a victim mentality do not support good health. A healthy emotional and mental attitude, in combination with wholesome diet, exercise and nutritional supplements encourage the immune system into new found health. It takes time and diligence. Success won't be achieved by a few weeks of diet focus followed by dietary cheating. It is what it is: a lifestyle change.

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    I just saw Elisabeth's interview late last night on Joy Behar's show which I NEVER watch. I didn't change the channel because I saw Elisabeth and think she is delightful to watch and listen to. I LOVED her on Survivor and watch 'The View' sometimes, only because of her; and yes, I am a republican too and very proud of it!!!

    Anyway, I about fell out of my chair as I listened to her talk about celiac disease. I had never heard of it.

    I have a darling niece who has been suffering for years with stomach problem and a light came on as I heard some of Elisabeth's symptoms. I wanted to call my sister right then and have her watch but it was to late.

    My sister was so excited when I called her this morning and told her about it and she is calling her daughter this very minute to pass on the information. I will be surprised if this isn't what she has been suffering from for all these years. This poor, sweet girl has been through test after test only to be told " nothing is wrong". She would come home from high school and lay doubled up in pain with tears in her eyes. She's always been a tinny little thing, with a ravenous appetite but she has had to starve herself because anything she eats makes her so sick.

    After High School she graduated from cosmetology school and started working, in pain. She spent 18 months on a mission for our church, in pain. She just got married a few months ago and has been trying to be the perfect bride, in pain. Oh how I hope this is finally the answer she has been looking for! Thank you Elisabeth for putting a face on something so frustrating and almost impossible to diagnose. I now LOVE you even more.

     

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    Elizabeth Hasselbeck is trying to get attention. Her story is no different than thousand of others.

    I find it so funny that people can't put their hatred aside for someone even if that person is shedding light on a condition that desperately needs more attention. Let me guess, Linda...you don't like her political opinions. Get over it. She's getting more people to talk about the disease, and that's a wonderful thing.

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    I find it so funny that people can't put their hatred aside for someone even if that person is shedding light on a condition that desperately needs more attention. Let me guess, Linda...you don't like her political opinions. Get over it. She's getting more people to talk about the disease, and that's a wonderful thing.

    Amen, Lew.

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    My 21 year old daughter was diag. with Celiac 20 years ago at Walter Reed Army Med. Ct. At the time (1991) Celiac was virtually unheard of and very little information, even through a nutritionist, was available. Through the years I have learned as I went along; doctors and nutritionists have been able to provide me with much more information as well. There is so much more known today (2010) about celiac sprue. I am always happily surprised when I go into a grocery store and see the words "Gluten Free" marked on a product. FYI...just because a product says it may be wheat free, does not make it gluten free. READ THE LABELS!!!

    Thank you Elisabeth for helping bring attention to celiac and the term "gluten free"!!!

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    Help. I've been diagnosed with IBS and acid reflux disease. But nothing is helping... How can I get this tested? They did an endo and upper scope wouldn't this have shown celiac?

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    My issue with Elisabeth's celiac claims are that she consistently says it's an allergy and calls it a lifestyle which makes it sound like some sort of elective way of living. Self-diagnosis of celiac can be dangerous. If you feel better not eating gluten then don't eat it but don't go around calling yourself celiac w/o blood tests and a biopsy. Going gluten-free is HARD and NOT an allergy. For some it may only be wheat issue or some other component in the food one is consuming. But having said all that bringing attention to celiac and gluten issues in general is a good thing. But don't self-diagnose and eliminate foods that do have nutritional benefits if you don't need to. Many gluten-free foods do not have the same nutritional value as conventional foods and can be much more expensive.

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    My issue with Elisabeth's celiac claims are that she consistently says it's an allergy and calls it a lifestyle which makes it sound like some sort of elective way of living. Self-diagnosis of celiac can be dangerous. If you feel better not eating gluten then don't eat it but don't go around calling yourself celiac w/o blood tests and a biopsy. Going gluten-free is HARD and NOT an allergy. For some it may only be wheat issue or some other component in the food one is consuming. But having said all that bringing attention to celiac and gluten issues in general is a good thing. But don't self-diagnose and eliminate foods that do have nutritional benefits if you don't need to. Many gluten-free foods do not have the same nutritional value as conventional foods and can be much more expensive.

    It sounds like you didn't read her book...she did get diagnosed, and recommends that people get tested and diagnosed.

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    My issue with Elisabeth's celiac claims are that she consistently says it's an allergy and calls it a lifestyle which makes it sound like some sort of elective way of living. Self-diagnosis of celiac can be dangerous. If you feel better not eating gluten then don't eat it but don't go around calling yourself celiac w/o blood tests and a biopsy. Going gluten-free is HARD and NOT an allergy. For some it may only be wheat issue or some other component in the food one is consuming. But having said all that bringing attention to celiac and gluten issues in general is a good thing. But don't self-diagnose and eliminate foods that do have nutritional benefits if you don't need to. Many gluten-free foods do not have the same nutritional value as conventional foods and can be much more expensive.

    It sounds like you didn't read her book...she did get diagnosed, and recommends that people get tested and diagnosed.

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    I'm SO thankful that I saw Elisabeth talking about celiac disease on the view. I'd never heard of it till then and for 3 years doctors told me I just had IBS. I told my new doctor about how I had all the symptoms and he ordered me a blood test and sure enough I have celiac. Elisabeth is amazing! She's raising awareness for a disease not many people are familiar with and helping people with her book!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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