Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Carla Spacher
    Carla Spacher

    Weight: Gain or Lose - Win the Game!

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue

    Weight: Gain or Lose - Win the Game! - Image: CC--Grace Adamski
    Caption: Image: CC--Grace Adamski

    Celiac.com 07/06/2017 - Each New Year you will find a plethora of articles on weight loss. Unfortunately, for those with celiac disease, weight loss is not always an issue, but for some the opposite is true. Though much false information in the medical community remains, such as "you must be underweight to have celiac disease", there are many who are overweight. Whether you want to gain or lose weight, they have one thing in common, the need for nutritious food, and food that does not cause inflammation in the body.

    If you look at autoimmune diseases, in general, you will notice they have one thing in common, inflammation. Celiac disease – inflammation of the small intestines; multiple sclerosis – inflammation of the central nervous system, Grave's disease – inflammation of the thyroid gland; arthritis – inflammation of the joint tissues and cartilage; Crohn's disease – inflammation of the digestive tract; Alzheimer's disease – inflammation of the brain; transverse myelitis – inflammation of the spinal cord; etc.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    When we consume foods that we are either allergic to or sensitive to, our white blood cells release toxic chemicals to fight off what it perceives as foreign bodies resulting in inflammation. If our bodies are too busy fighting off inflammation from a non-optimal diet or stress, they do not have enough resources to fight the real bad guys.

    Some of the foods known to fight or prevent inflammation are spices such as turmeric, curry, cinnamon, ginger, and garlic; tropical fruit such as coconut, pineapple (contains a natural antihistamine), and papaya; green tea; fish oil and fish; and a wide variety of colorful vegetables such as spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, kelp, red peppers, sweet potatoes, and cabbage.

    Research shows that omega-3's are not only known to reduce inflammation, but it may lower the risk of chronic diseases such as arthritis, cancer and heart disease(1). Because our bodies cannot make omega-3 fatty acids we must obtain them from food or supplements. If your doctor has recommended that you take an omega-3 supplement or increase omega-3 in your diet, it is important that you know the two main types. Omega-3's which are marine-based (fish and fish oil) contain EPA and DHA, where the other contains ALA. ALA omega-3 may be obtained from soybean, canola, and flax seed oils, ground flax seed, and walnuts, as well as kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and leafy greens. Though our body does not make omega-3's, it does partially convert ALA to DHA and EPA. Per Harvard School of Public Health, we do not know which, if either, is more beneficial (2,3). Research does show that EPA and DHA do reduce the risk of heart disease in older adults.(4) When ALA is added to our diet it is known to reduce the risk of breast cancer and prostate cancer, as it helps your body metabolize estrogens into a safer form.

    You may already be aware of the fact that aloe vera contains a gel-like substance that is known to heal. (As a side note, aloe vera products sometimes contain laytex.) Flax seeds contain the same property. It is also high in omega-3, though yellow flax seeds are lower. Brown flax seeds have the most health benefits.

    Another popular superfood is chia seeds. It does not contain the same properties as flax, however, chia seeds provide similar benefits as flax, and they do not need to be ground in order to reap those benefits. Chia benefits include fiber, calcium, antioxidants, protein, and more.

    Fiber is known to make one feel full, however, both flax and chia seeds absorb quite a bit of liquid, creating the feeling of fullness for a longer period of time than many other fibers. This is a great and healthy way to lose weight.

    A misconception about losing weight is to skip meals. When you do this it throws your blood sugar levels out of whack. Some believe this results in weight gain, or at least in no loss. Minimally, it is unhealthy. What does make sense is that if you eat more often such as 4 – 5 times a day, and on a regular schedule, your blood sugar levels maintain balance and your body recognizes that it will receive more food soon, which may prevent it from going into a starvation mode, storing fat. The bottom line is always calorie intake, though. Choose wisely, and avoid the use of refined sugar and artificial sweeteners, as this increases acidity in the body, resulting in inflammation. When chronic inflammation is present in the body it depresses the immune system and creates disease, even tumors.(2) Inflammation really is the precursor to disease.

    For those with celiac disease needing to gain weight, note that it may take several months to up to a year before your gut is healed enough to absorb nutrients properly. Meanwhile, check the ingredients and foods that you consume to ensure they are truly gluten-free. Due to the lack of labeling laws in the U.S., a food labeled gluten-free may still contain a small amount of gluten. Consume a high calorie diet with healthy fats such as avocado,coconut oil, high calorie nuts such as walnuts and pecans, nut butters, and if dairy-tolerant, cream cheese. Add avocado to your sandwiches, healthy oil to protein shakes and smoothies; consume high carbohydrates such as potatoes; and snack between meals.

    Individuals who need to avoid dairy may find it difficult at times. There are a number of gluten-free, dairy-free substitutes on the market now. If you are soy and corn intolerant, as well, you may find it difficult to find a dairy-free substitute for butter. A small percentage of dairy intolerant individuals may tolerate goat's milk; and some even tolerate ghee (clarified butter). Because a minute amount of dairy protein may remain in ghee, and because goat's milk is considered dairy, it is best to be tested for food allergies if you suspect a dairy allergy, prior to consuming the above.

    Previous studies on food allergies focused on antibodies (proteins that attack foreign substances and sometimes even food) found in the blood. In a preliminary study performed by the University of Osio, Norway, it was discovered that food-related antibodies may end up in the gut. When the body mistakes a food for a foreign matter, it creates IgE antibodies (Immunoglobin E), which creates a chain reaction of symptoms. Though the study was performed on those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in the participants' intestinal fluid they found antibodies to the following foods: cow's milk, hen, cereal, eggs, codfish, and pork, at higher levels than in non-RA patients.(5) Similar results may be found in those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, even the general population. We will not know until additional studies are performed. It is definitely food for thought.

    If you have any type of unexplained symptoms, that medical professionals have not been able to diagnose, consider being tested for other food intolerances or allergies, besides gluten. Consuming foods that cause your immune system to react will only create additional inflammation. There has been much talk that many individuals have had positive results from using Cyrex Labs. You cannot do these tests by mail, as someone must draw your blood. However Cyrex Labs has a list of doctors who will provide this service.

    If you are not quite sure what you are allergic or sensitive to, another option to consider is an allergy elimination diet. For one month eat only meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, basically a caveman diet, quite a bit stricter than the Paleo Diet. (Definitely check with your doctor first.) Then introduce one food at a time back into your diet. Note that food allergy reactions may be immediate or within a couple of days, where a sensitivity may take longer to show up.(6) This is also a great way to lose weight.

    If you are new to the gluten-free diet, make sure to introduce new foods, especially gluten free grains, one at the time. Consume the item a few times within a couple of days and wait for 2-4 days and take note whether you have a reaction to it. The reaction may be as complicated as hives, dermatitis herpetiformis, or digestive issues; or as simple as a bad night's sleep or slight bloating. Note that some people may not present any symptoms, even to gluten, and still have celiac disease. The above is referenced for food allergies and sensitivities only. The best advice for anyone who is gluten intolerant is to strictly adhere to the gluten-free diet. One study shows that only 52.1% of those with celiac disease adhere to a gluten-free diet.(7)

    What will your New Year's resolution be now?

    References:
    1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids University of Maryland Medical System http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omrga-3-000316.htm  (Accessed December 6, 2012).
    2. Inflammation http://www.arizonaadvancedmedicine.com/articles/inflammation.html  (Accessed December 7, 2012).
    3. The Nutrition Source, Ask the Expert: Omega-2 Fatty Acids Harvard School of Public Health http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/questions/omega-3/index.html  (Accessed December 6, 2012).
    4. Circulating long-chain w-3 fatty acids and incidence of congestive heart failure in older adults: the cardiovascular health study: a cohort study. PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nigh.gov/pubmed/21810709  (Accessed December 6, 2012).
    5. Denise Lynn Mann Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: RA and Food Allergies http://www.arthritistoday.org/conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/nutrition-and-ra/ra-food-allergies.php  (Accessed December 7, 2012).
    6. Dr. Jonathan Brostoff, M.D. Food Allergies and Food Intolerance: The Complete Guide to Their Identification and Treatment (2000)
    7. Talluri SK, Besur S, Talluri J, Department of Internal Medicine, McLaren-MSU Internal Medicine Residency Program, Flint, MI - A Population-Based Survey of Celiac Disease in the United States http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/events/2012nchs/poster_abstracts.htm#abstract74  (Accessed December 7, 2012).



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Carla Spacher

    Carla Spacher is a gluten-free consultant and recipe developer to retail, restaurants, and manufacturers such as KitchenAid, and food companies; the founder of glutenfreerecipebox.com; author of Gluten-Free Bread Baking Defined; and provides cooking lessons. She is a member of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America, The Health Sciences Institute, and the National Association of Professional Women. Carla has been mentioned on such sites as NEWS10 ABC, KATV ABC, WRCB-TV 3 NBC, and more. Visit her Web site: http://glutenfreerecipebox.com


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/06/2015 - Several studies have shown that many patients with celiac disease experience changes in body weight after starting a gluten-free diet, but researchers still don't have much data on rates of metabolic syndrome in this population.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess rates of metabolic syndrome in patients with celiac at diagnosis, and at one year after starting gluten-free diet. The research team included R. Tortora, P. Capone, G. De Stefano, N. Imperatore, N. Gerbino, S. Donetto, V. Monaco, N. Caporaso, and A. Rispo. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University Federico II of Naples, Naples, Italy, or with the Department of Education and Professional Studies, King's College London, London, UK.
    For their study, the team enrolled all consecutive patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease who were referred to their third-level celiac disease unit. For all patients the team collected data on waist circumference, BMI, blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar levels.
    The team diagnosed metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria for European countries. They reassessed rates of metabolic syndrome in patients after 12 months of gluten-free diet.
    The team assessed ninety-eight patients with celiac disease, two (2%) who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome at diagnosis, and 29 patients (29.5%) after 12 months of gluten-free diet (P < 0.01; OR: 20).
    After 1 year on a gluten-free diet, the team compared the patient data to baseline, with respect to metabolic syndrome sub-categories. They found 72 vs. 48 patients exceeded waist circumference cut-off (P < 0.01; OR: 2.8); 18 vs. 4 patients had high blood pressure (P < 0.01; OR: 5.2); 25 vs. 7 patients exceeded glycemic threshold (P = 0.01; OR: 4.4); 34 vs. 32 patients with celiac disease had reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (P = 0.7); and 16 vs. 7 patients had high levels of triglycerides (P = 0.05).
    The results of this study show that celiac disease patients have a high risk of developing metabolic syndrome 1 year after starting a gluten-free diet.
    To address this, the research team recommends an in-depth nutritional assessment for all patients with celiac disease.
    Source: 
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015;41(4):352-359.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/11/2015 - There's an idea, common among lay and medical people alike, that kids with celiac disease are skinny, and that overweight or fat kids can't have celiac disease.
    A new study shows puts this idea to rest, and shows that celiac disease can in fact develop in kids who are overweight or obese. The study was conducted by a team of researchers including T Capriati, R Francavilla, F Ferretti, S Castellaneta, M Ancinelli and A Diamanti.
    Their study describes the nutritional status of a group of 445 children with celiac disease at presentation, and during follow-up on gluten-free diet. The children, all with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, were prospectively enrolled at one of two Italian centers (Rome and Bari), and diagnosed between 2009 and 2013.
    Researchers used Body Mass Index as a measure of nutritional status according to Italian growth charts of Cacciari.
    Overall, males were far more likely than females to be overweight/obese. Furthermore, overweight/obesity children as compared with those with normal weight were significantly older and had significantly lower levels of tTG antibodies.
    This study shows that some celiac disease children are obese/overweight at diagnosis. So, even though it's more common for kids with celiac disease to be normal weight, doctors shouldn't rule out celiac disease in kids just because they're overweight or obese. In fact, celiac diagnosis is often missed in kids who are overweight.
    The takeaway from this study is that overweight kids can have celiac disease, and that celiac diagnosis must be considered even in overweight/obese children where this diagnosis can be easily missed.

    Source:
     European Journal of Clinical Nutrition , (28 October 2015). doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.169


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2016 - Common clinical wisdom, and some data, indicate that patients with celiac disease are likely to be underweight. However, data from west suggest that anywhere from 8% to 40% of celiac patients can be overweight or obese.
    What about normal weight? Can people with celiac disease also have normal body weight? A research team recently set out to determine if people with celiac disease can be normal weight. The research team included I Singh, A Agnihotri, A Sharma, AK Verma, P Das, B Thakur, V Sreenivas, SD Gupta, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, the Department of Pathology, the Department of Biostatistics, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Ansari Nagar in New Delhi, India.
    To answer that question, a team of researchers recently reviewed data on body mass index (BMI) of patients with celiac disease so they could correlate BMI with other celiac characteristics. For their retrospective study, the team reviewed case records of 210 adolescent and adult celiac patients who were seen at the team's Celiac Disease Clinic.
    To classify BMI as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese, they used the Consensus Statement for Diagnosis of Obesity, Abdominal Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome for Asian Indians for those with age >18 years and revised Indian Association of Pediatrics BMI-for-age charts for those between 12 and 18 years.
    Their results showed that, of 210 patients, 115 patients were normal weight, while 76 patients were underweight, 13 were overweight, and 6 were obese. There was no difference in the proportion of underweight between male and female patients with celiac disease.
    The mean age of underweight patients was similar to those who were normal or overweight. Regardless of weight, there was no difference between any of the patients in terms of average duration of symptoms; frequencies of diarrhea, anorexia, and weakness; anemia; titer of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody; and severity of villous atrophy in those with underweight or normal weight or overweight.
    Of the celiac disease patients in this clinic, only one third of patients with celiac disease actually had low BMI. More than half had normal BMI, while the rest were either overweight or obese.
    Physicians should not discount the possibility of celiac disease based solely on BMI. Patients with normal and high BMI can also have celiac disease.
    Source:
     Indian J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jan;35(1):20-4. doi: 10.1007/s12664-016-0620-9. Epub 2016 Feb 18.


    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    Celiac.com 01/19/2017 - When celiac disease was originally described, one of its hallmark presenting signs was extreme underweight. Along with diarrhea, digestive pain and bloating, the severe weight loss was understood to 'always' be present. Fast forward over 100 years and things have changed. Not only are many celiacs overweight, but those with gluten sensitivity are increasingly falling into that category as well.
    Sadly, too often doctors miss testing for these life-long conditions because of a patient's weight status. Stuck in the historical definition, these doctors have missed the current face of celiac and gluten sensitivity – a person can be any weight, and they frequently have weight to lose.
    We often speak of the leaky gut, formally known as a condition of increased intestinal permeability, found in the small intestine. This situation is seen most often in those with an intolerance to gluten due to their upregulation of a protein only made by humans, called zonulin. Zonulin was discovered by Dr. Alessio Fasano and his team.
    The zonulin molecule dictates the opening and closing of the 'gates' of the small intestine. With a surface area of over 3,000 square feet, that involves a lot of gates!
    While only humans make zonulin, not all humans produce it. Twenty percent do not, 50 percent has a single copy of the gene and 30 percent of the population has both copies of the gene. Those with both copies are in the unenviable position of being two times more likely to die from all causes, and the diseases they do get tend to be more severe.
    When a lab test was done on rats highly predisposed to develop type 1 diabetes, two thirds of them never developed the disease when they were given a drug that inhibited zonulin. I know you're going to ask, so here's the answer: A drug does not yet exist for humans that performs this function. However, it is being developed, along with a test for zonulin, by Dr Fasano.
    A study published last Fall in Nutrition Research titled "Potential mechanisms for the emerging link between obesity and increased intestinal permeability” and lead by TF Teixeira, found a link that could well explain the obesity issue so commonly seen.
    Those with an intolerance to gluten not only tend to have a leaky gut due to the above mentioned zonulin connection, but they also have weakened immune systems due to the constant assault by gluten. The weakened immune system, predominantly housed in the small intestine, is thus less able to defend the body against the normal barrage of bacteria, amoeba, parasites and the like. Why do I call the presence of these organisms 'normal'? Because it is. Now, with that said, it is NOT normal for such organisms to gain a foothold in the intestine and procreate there, but their presence is a normal byproduct of eating food, putting one's fingers in one's mouth, etc. (These are microscopic organisms so don't get too grossed out.) The point is, that a healthy immune system easily kills them; an unhealthy immune system is unable to do its job. The result is a gut full of endotoxins (toxins released from inside bacteria when they disintegrate) or other inhospitable organisms.
    These bad organisms thereby fight against the good ones. The good bacteria in the gut (called the microbiome) literally have a population that exceeds the number of cells in the human body by 10 times. The genes associated with this population exceeds that of the human body by 100 times. We are talking about a part of the human body, long under-appreciated, that is now being considered influential enough to be considered an 'organ' in its own right.
    Emerging research reveals that when this organ is overwhelmed by toxins in the gut, its composition changes as far as the balance of certain organisms (probiotics), as does its ability to absorb nutrients and expend energy (burn calories). The result is not only weight gain but increased cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin resistance – the latter leads to diabetes, heart disease and obesity.
    Intestinal permeability is also thought to be influenced by a high fat and high fructose diet, plus certain nutritional deficiencies such as zinc.
    Another study from the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition titled "Gut Microbiota, Intestinal Permeability, Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Liver Injury” found much the same data.
    They found that eating a poor diet (high fat, high fructose) could affect the microbiome in as little as one to two days – the result being heart disease and obesity.
    So, how do we keep our microbiome happy?
    Discover if you have a gluten or dairy intolerance. If so, avoid those foods. Avoid excess, bad fats including fast food, trans fats, preprocessed, prepackaged foods, etc. Avoid ALL fructose. I'm not talking about the natural fructose in fruit, of course, but all added fructose, especially high fructose corn sweeteners. If you can, get your gut tested for the presence of any inhospitable organisms that have gotten a foothold in your system. This same test will evaluate the health of your microbiome. Another test that's good, as a verifier that you're on the right track, is one for a leaky gut. We tend to recommend this one once you've been on a reparative program for a while, to confirm that we are accomplishing our goal. Do ingest 9 servings of organic vegetables and fruits each day. These are naturally healing and prebiotic, meaning that they give strength and nourishment to your probiotic population. Ensure that you are not deficient in any major vitamins and minerals such as B's, D, zinc, magnesium, calcium, etc. While it seems like a 'no brainer' to take probiotics, here's a couple of things to keep in mind.
    a. Use a human strain b. Get a combination of organisms such as acidophilus, bifidus, etc. c. Due to dairy products being such a commonly sensitive food, get probiotics that are free of all dairy. d. Sometimes, if you have an infection in the gut, you may feel worse on probiotics. If this occurs, stop them, of course, but realize that you should look into step 4 above. I'm happy to help you! Don't cheat. I'm sorry, but being 'good' Monday through Friday and going crazy on the weekends just isn't going to cut it if you want to be healthy. And if your health is already compromised somewhat, cheating just isn't worth the dangerous repercussions. That microbiome can change in a day or two when you've been eating a poor diet. Remember that.
    I hope you found this helpful. It is interesting how much we are discovering about how the health of the gut dictates so much about our general health or tendency towards disease. And it's also quite revealing how much of a culprit gluten can be when trying to optimize the function of the small intestine and its immune system.
    Please send me your questions or comments. I am here to help!
    My clinic, HealthNOW Medical Center, is a destination clinic. You don't need to live locally to receive help with your health. You are welcome to call us anytime for a free health analysis – 408-733-0400.
    References:
    Nutrition Research. 2012 Sep;32(9):637-47. Potential mechanisms for the emerging link between obesity and increased intestinal permeability.Teixeira TF, Collado MC, Ferreira CL, Bressan J, Peluzio Mdo C. Journal of Parenteral and ENteral Nutrition 2011. Gut Microbiota, Intestinal Permeability, Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Liver Injury. Thomas H. Frazier, MD1; John K. DiBaise, MD, and Craig J. McClain, MD. Volume XX Number X


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...