Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    What’s the Relationship Between Celiac Disease and Endocrine Autoimmunity?

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Patients with monoglandular and/or polyglandular autoimmunity, and their relatives, have higher rates of celiac disease than those without such autoimmunity. A new study looks into the relationship between the two conditions.


    Caption: Thyroid check up. Image: CC--COM SALUD Agencia de comunicación

    Celiac.com 12/20/2018 - Patients with monoglandular and/or polyglandular autoimmunity, and their relatives, have higher rates of celiac disease than those without such autoimmunity. Somewhere between 10 and 30% of patients with celiac disease test positive for thyroid and/or type 1 diabetes antibodies, while around 5 to 7% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes test positive for IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. 

    A team of researchers recently set out to examine the relationship between celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity. The research team included George J. Kahalya, Lara Frommera, and Detlef Schuppan. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine I, Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, Mainz, Germany, the Institute for Translational Immunology and Research Center for Immunotherapy (FZI), Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) Medical Center, Mainz, Germany, and the Division of Gastroenterology and the Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity do share a common genetic background, which definitely explains some of the relationship. The main common denominators are HLA antigens DQ2 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201) and/or DQ8 (DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302), that are tightly linked to DR3 and DR4, respectively. 

    Researchers have identified functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of various genes involved in immune regulation as susceptibility genes for both celiac disease and monoglandular or polyglandular autoimmunity. This is a promising hypothesis, but exactly how the effects of a gluten-free diet might prevent or ameliorate glandular autoimmunity remains unclear. 

    Based on their results, the research team does recommend that all patients with celiac disease be tested for type 1 diabetes and/or autoimmune thyroid disease. They also recommend that patients with the above autoimmune endocrine disorders be checked for celiac disease.

    Read more at:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 08/05/2010 - A myriad of autoimmune disordersincluding, Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes and celiac disease areclosely associated with the HLA-DR3 haplotype. However it is has beenhypothesized that alleles of other genes in linkage disequilibriumwith HLA-DRB1 also contribute to the diseases.
    Researchers at the Barbara Davis Centerfor Childhood Diabetes, University...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/01/2017 - More and more evidence shows a connection between gut inflammation and type 1 diabetes (T1D). A team of researchers recently set out to assess gut inflammatory profiles and microbiota in patients with T1D, and to compare them with healthy controls (CTRL) and with celiac disease patients as gut inflammatory disease controls.
    The research team included...

    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    Celiac.com 10/27/2017 - It has long been understood that two autoimmune diseases, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes are related. They share common genes and the incidence of celiac disease is higher among type 1 diabetics. There have been some anecdotal reports regarding children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who were put on a gluten-free diet soon after their diagnosis and for...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    Thank you very much for that info, yes I am awaiting a test but was just looking for some reassurance in the meantime really and to you know if anybody else has similar symptoms. Thank you x
    Welcome! There are over 200 symptoms attributed to celiac disease. Migraines are one of them as celiac disease is systemic (not just gut issues).   The only way to find out is to get tested.  Ask your PCP for a simple blood test: ...
    Yogurt can vary from 4-17 grams of lactose, Milk has 9-14, so it may be slightly less than milk but not by much. I know that shortly after I was DX'd with Celiac I was lactose intolerant for about the first 5-6 months of gluten-free diet....
×
×
  • Create New...