Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams

    What Factors Promote Hypertransaminasemia in Celiac Disease?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 07/23/2014 - Transaminasemia develops through various pathways in patients with celiac disease. Currently, there is not much information on risk factors specifically attributable to celiac disease.

    A team of researchers recently set out to determine what factors contribute to hypertransaminasemia in patients with celiac disease. The research team included B. Zanini B, R. Baschè A., Ferraresi, M.G. Pigozzi, C. Ricci, F. Lanzarotto, V. Villanacci, and A. Lanzini.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    They analyzed data collected from consecutive patients referred from January 1997 through December 2009 to the celiac disease clinic at the Spedali Civili of Brescia, Italy. They then used serologic and biopsy analysis to assess the factors influencing hypertransaminasemia in 683 patients with celiac disease (group A), and 304 patients with functional gastrointestinal syndromes (group B). Both groups were about the same average age and range.

    The research team detected hypertransaminasemia in 138 patients in group A (20%). Factors associated with the condition included malabsorption (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; P = .004), diarrhea (OR, 1.72; P = .005), and increasing severity of mucosal lesion (Marsh-Oberhuber class; OR, 1.46; P = .001), but not body mass index (BMI) or the blood levels of tissue-transglutaminase antibodies (tTG).

    The team also detected hypertransaminasemia in 22 patients from group B (7%), which they found to be associated with the World Health Organization's BMI categories (OR, 7.9; P < .001). A total of 313 patients from group A had significantly higher levels of tTG at baseline (25.2 ± 16.9 U/L aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) than a similar bunch from group B (20.6 ± 9.9 U/L AST, P < .0001). These levels were related to BMI in group B (P = .0012), but not group A.

    Patients eating gluten-free diets saw levels of AST decrease from 25.2 ± 16.9 U/L to 19.9 ± 6.6 U/L (P < .0001). This decrease was independent of the changes of duodenal histology and tTG and correlated with BMI (P = .0007). Meanwhile, the prevalence of hypertransaminasemia in gluten-free patients decreased from 13% to 4%.

    These study results show that hypertransaminasemia is more common in people with celiac disease than in patients with functional gut syndromes. Also, hypertransaminasemia is related to the severity of the duodenal lesion and malabsorption, but unrelated to BMI.

    By contrast, the control group, with functional gut syndromes, showed a positive correlation between the levels of AST and BMI. This relationship was restored when patients with celiac disease began to follow gluten-free diets.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Author: Bardella MT; Fraquelli M; Quatrini M; Molteni N; Bianchi P; Conte D
    Address: Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Universit a degli Studi di Milano, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore, Italy.
    Source: Hepatology, 1995 Sep, 22:3, 833-6
    The prevalence of hypertransaminasemia and the effect of gluten-free diet (GFD) were evaluated in 158 consecutive adult celiac patients, 127 women and 31 men, aged 18 to 68 years (mean, 32). At diagnosis, 67 patients (42%) had raised aspartate and/or alanine transaminase levels (AST and ALT; mean, 47 IU/L, range, 30 to 190; and 61 IU/L, range, 25 to 470, respectively), whereas 91 patients had normal liver function...

    Roy Jamron
    Celiac.com 04/27/2006 - Liver abnormalities have been found in a high percentage of celiacs when first diagnosed, around 42% according to some studies. Gluten toxicity and increased intestinal permeability have both been suspected as a cause of liver abnormalities. Serious liver disorders, including cirrhosis, have been found in association with a number of celiac disease cases which appear to resolve upon treatment and maintaining a gluten-free diet. It is not clear whether some damage to the liver may remain long term even after maintaining a gluten-free diet. Below is an interesting study (Hepatology. 2006 Mar 23;43(4):837-846) of the effects...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/06/2009 - A report in the February 3rd issue of Digestive and Liver Disease highlights the present understanding of transglutaminase function in gastrointestinal and liver diseases and therapeutic strategies that target transglutaminase activities.
    A team of American and Italian researchers recently set out to review the current body of literature regarding transglutaminase function in gastrointestinal and liver diseases and therapeutic strategies that target transglutaminase activities. The research team was made up of doctors L. Elli, C.M. Bergamini, C.M. Bardella, and D. Schuppan.
    They are associated with one or more of the following...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/22/10 - A research team set out to examine gut diseases and prognostic factors tied to non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension. The team included C. E. Eapen, Peter Nightingale, Stefan G. Hubscher, Peter J. Lane, Timothy Plant, Dimitris Velissaris, and Elwyn Elias.
    The prognosis for non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH) is usually benign. Assessment of a cohort study followed-up at a tertiary referral center leads the research team to hypothesize that gut-derived prothrombotic factors may contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of NCIPH.
    The team conducted a retrospective analysis of celiac disease indicators...