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    Scott Adams

    What is the difference between celiac disease and gluten intolerance?*

    Scott Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The following was posted by Kemp Randolph on the Celiac Listserv news group krand@pipeline.com:



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    The difference is that between two immune related reactions, allergy and intolerance. I asked the question of the technical difference between the two some time ago and got no response. Its not based on overt symptoms, thats for sure. Were also not talking about the difference between latent celiac disease and overt weight-loss, apple belly celiac disease. You can be allergic and intolerant of the same substance or food In the case of milk, its lactose(milk carbohydrate) intolerance and milk protein allergy.

    My non-professional stab at the difference between intolerance and allergy then. Both can lead to intestinal damage. Theres a table in Marshs book showing that --page 155 , figure 6.13. Type 3 damage (flat destructive ) can occur from milk, soy, egg.... as well as celiac disease.

    The reaction to an intolerance seems to be that the substance is not digested. The immune part of the response involves only the circulating immunoglobins IgA, maybe IgG and related immune cells, receptors.

    The immune reaction to an allergy involves IgE. The substance may still be digested, but there may be allergic responses elsewhere outside the gut.

    Apple belly celiac disease is an intolerance. The problems elsewhere in the body, except for cancer, are related to nutritional deficiencies. The link to other autoimmune diseases is statistical genetics when two (or more) genes for each of two conditions are close together.

    For more information see the Allergy vs. Intolerance page.


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    You need to do some more research. Celiacs, allergies and intolerance do not all damage the gut. Celiacs is the only one that damages the gut and does not allow nutritional absorption. Food allergies cause allergy type symptoms-skin rashes, itchy skin, and/or tummy problems. Intolerance bother the tummy, cause no damage, and go away once food has passed through.

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    You need to do some more research. Celiacs, allergies and intolerance do not all damage the gut. Celiacs is the only one that damages the gut and does not allow nutritional absorption. Food allergies cause allergy type symptoms-skin rashes, itchy skin, and/or tummy problems. Intolerance bother the tummy, cause no damage, and go away once food has passed through.

    Um I hate to differ with you L. Rensch. I have gluten intolerance not celiac and I can officially tell you that as of now when I ingest gluten it takes 3 days for my tummy to be able to handle food well enough to feel normal again.

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    Um I hate to differ with you L. Rensch. I have gluten intolerance not celiac and I can officially tell you that as of now when I ingest gluten it takes 3 days for my tummy to be able to handle food well enough to feel normal again.

    Isn't 3 days how long it typically takes your body to digest and expel food? Unless you have a particularly fast metabolism, it really is about getting the gluten out of your system whether your have an intolerance OR an allergy.

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    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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