Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jefferson Adams

    Wheat Protein Show Growth-factor like Activity in the Gut

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 04/23/2007 - A study published in a recent issue of the journal Gut suggests that wheat gliadin might trigger pathological development in mucosal cells that are already abnormal, but otherwise tolerated, within the intestinal tracts of individuals with celiac disease.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Researchers at the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II in Naples, Italy, led by Dr. Salvatore Auricchio looked at the effects of gliadin peptides on various cell lines and celiac mucosal cells in culture.

    More specifically, the study evaluated the effects of gliadin and affiliated toxic peptides such as A-gliadin P31-43 on endocytosis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytoskeleton rearrangements, and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

    The researchers report that gliadin peptides induce EGF-like effects across a wide range of cell types. Actin rearrangements and cell proliferation are examples of these effects. Also, they state that gliadin peptides act not as ligands of the EGF receptor, but that they actually inhibit EGFR endocytosis.

    According to the research team, these observations of gliadin-induced delay of EGFR endocytosis, along with S-phase entry of epithelial intestinal cells, clearly indicate that EGFR plays a role in celiac disease. Dr. Auricchio proffers that a genetic factor in celiacs may bring about deregulated activity in the endocytotic pathway that is compensated in the absence of gliadin.

    The study concludes that wheat gliadin slows receptor deactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor. This may explain how wheat gliadin and related cereal prolamines trigger rapid increase in cell growth and associated disease activity in people with celiac disease.

    Gut 2007;56:480-488.

     

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/13/2009 - A team of Spanish researchers recently set out to determine rates and clinical status of gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE) detected by mass blood screens. The researchers also sought to determine sensitivity of anti-transglutaminase (tTGA) and anti-endomysium antibodies (EmA) in diagnosis, and compliance with a gluten-free diet (GFD) and follow-up.
    The research team was made up of doctors Meritxell Mariné, Fernando Fernández-Bañares, Montserrat Alsina, Carme Farré, Montserrat Cortijo, Rebeca Santaolalla, Antonio Salas, Margarita Tomàs, Elias Abugattas, Carme Loras, Ingrid Ordás, Josep M Viver, and Maria Esteve.
    Researchers recru...

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 07/26/2010 - There is very little information currently available regarding the effects of follow up strategies for those celiac patients that follow a gluten-free diet. Therefore, it was the aim of of researchers in Italy to determine the t-transglutaminase antibodies (t-TG) in celiac disease patients while they were enrolled in a community based follow-up program over a 5-year period.
    Most patients that are diagnosed with celiac disease are told they need to adhere to a gluten-free diet for the remainder of their lives, and then they are usually left to figure it out on their own. However, it is recommended that celiac patients have regularly...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/18/2011 - By blocking an inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15), doctors may be able to treat and prevent symptoms of celiac disease in some people, according to a new study in the journal Nature.
    The data suggest that the inflammatory response to gluten in people with celiac disease may be triggered by interleukin-15 and retinoic acid, which is a derivative of vitamin A.
    The team notes that researchers previously thought that retinoic acid would lessen the inflammation in the intestine. Instead their study showed that it might actually worsen inflammation.
    According to Bana Jabri, MD, PhD, a member of the Celiac Disease...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/10/2012 - The HBV vaccine is usually effective against common hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, with just 4-10% of vaccine recipients failing to respond to standard immunization. Some studies suggest that people with celiac disease may have high levels of resistance to the HBV vaccine, compared to the general population.
    A team of researchers recently took a look at the issue of HBV vaccine reliability in people with celiac disease.
    The study team included Mohammad Rostami Nejad, Kamran Rostami, and Mohammad Reza Zali. They are variously affiliated with the Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease at Shahid Beheshti...