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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Who Makes the Best Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      There are many companies who make gluten-free sandwich bread, but which one is the best?


    Caption: Photo: CC--Johanna Alderson

    Celiac.com 01/02/2018 - Sandwich lovers can get mighty particular about which breads make the best sandwich. There's plenty of room for opinion, and personal taste can include opinions on toasting versus non-toasting, seeded versus non-seeded, white versus whole grain, and on and on.

    That means that this list of gluten-free sandwich breads is not meant to be authoritative. It is not written in stone. In fact, it is subject to revision based on input and suggestions by our readers.

    That said, these are some of the stand-out gluten-free sandwich breads that we have tried.

    Bread Srsly
    Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, sorghum and arrowroot with a wild sourdough culture to deliver a tasty gluten-free classic with a delightful sourdough tang.

    Okay, it's not pre-sliced, so technically it may not quality as sandwich bread, but I'm such a fan of Bread Srsly. Toast this bread up and it makes a lovely base for a sandwich. The tangy sourdough is perfect for ham, or tuna salad, or just a bout anything else you want on your sandwich. Breadsrsly.com

    Canyon Bakehouse
    Canyon Bakehouse makes a wide variety of gluten-free bread products. Canyon's gluten-free breads can also be stored at room temperature without becoming crumbly, making them perfect for sandwiches. Canyon. Breads are also excellent for grilled sandwiches. Certified gluten-free, Dairy Free, Soy Free, Nut Free, Non GMO. Canyonglutenfree.com

    Franz
    Seattle favorite Franz bakery makes a respectable sandwich bread.
    Franz makes gluten-free bread with a nice, chewy consistency that doesn't crumble, so you can make a sandwich with or without toasting. Great for lunches! Franzbakery.com

    Glutino 
    Glutino gluten-free breads come in four styles: Cinnamon Raisin; Multigrain; Seeded and White. Glutino breads are light enough to eat right out of the bag. They also come in a nice, full size slices so you can make a proper sandwich. Glutino.com

    Rudi's
    Once found only in the frozen section, Rudi's now makes a soft, fluffy sliced bread that can be eaten right out of the bag.
    Rudi's keeps it simple with just two varieties of gluten-free fresh sliced bread, Original and Multigrain. Both are perfect for sandwiches as is, but toast up nicely. RudisBakery.com

    Schär
    Schär uses top quality rice, corn or buckwheat, along with sorghum, a traditional African grain, or quinoa, to make its long-fermented gluten-free sourdough sliced loaves and baguettes.

    Sourdough enzymes help the bread to stay fresh longer after baking, enrich the bread with vitamins, and eliminates the need for artificial preservatives. Schaer.com

    Trader Joe's
    Yes, Trader Joe's offers a gluten-free bread. Trader Joe's Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is dairy, soy, nut, and gluten-free. It's made with brown rice flour, teff (a grass cultivated for grain), whole grain amaranth, whole grain sorghum (also in the grass family, and cultivated for grain), tapioca, potato, and flaxseed meal.

    According to Trader Joe's website, their Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is “lower in fat, with fewer calories than its big-brand counterpart.” Traderjoes.com

    Three Bakers
    Three Bakers gluten-free sliced sandwich bread comes in four varieties: White Bread Whole Grain; 7 Ancient Grain Whole Grain Bread; Rye Style Whole Grain Bread; and MAXOMEGA™ Whole Grain AND 5 Seed Bread. Threebakers.com

    Udi's Gluten-Free White
    Light, airy and fiber-rich, Udi's popular sandwich loaf bread is made with all natural ingredients without added fillers. Udisglutenfree.com


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    Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, check following study: ´Antithyroid and goitrogenic effects of millet: role of C-glycosylflavones´. I would prefer to stay away from that Trader Joe's... flaxseed meal. Google ´flaxseed testosterone study´. And you'll see how it plays with hormones. Especially - testosterone. I would avoid that. Sadly the article is not helpful at all.

    Regarding your comment to "Google flaxseed testosterone study." I'm afraid your scientific literacy needs some work. The main study that comes up is a case study--that means a single person. That study describes the impact of flaxseed supplementation (30 g/day) on hormonal levels in a 31-year old woman with PCOS. So, basically a single individual was eating up to an ounce of flaxseed per day, and experienced issues. Issues that may or may not be due to the flax consumption. A simple dietary levels, there is basically ZERO chance that flax will cause any issues, hormonal or otherwise. Flax and millet are both safe at basic dietary levels.

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    Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, check following study: ´Antithyroid and goitrogenic effects of millet: role of C-glycosylflavones´. I would prefer to stay away from that Trader Joe's... flaxseed meal. Google ´flaxseed testosterone study´. And you'll see how it plays with hormones. Especially - testosterone. I would avoid that. Sadly the article is not helpful at all.

    Lastly, the patient cited in the flaxseed study was a women, not a man. Even if flaxseed were the cause, it is unlikely to impact men in the same way. At the end of the day, that single case study tells us nothing about the dietary safety of flax seed.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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