Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Will Australia's Gluten-free Barley Set the Beer World on Fire?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Celiac.com 04/29/2016 - Efforts to develop gluten-free version of traditional grains like wheat have been underway for some time, with limited success.

    Photo: CC--Allispossible.org.ukNow, scientists in Australia say they've developed the world's first World Health Organization-approved "gluten-free" barley.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Since barley is a key ingredient in traditional beers, you might imagine that the beer viewing world would be keenly interested in such a development, and you would be right.

    Developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), the product, called Kebari barley, has already drawn interest from a number of commercial breweries. One German brewery, Radeberger, has already ordered 70 tons of the product.

    Kebari is not genetically modified. Instead, it is the end product of "cross-breeding low gluten barley varieties," CSIRO told Reuters. While Kebari is not 100 percent gluten-free, it is bred to contain "10,000 times less gluten than traditional strains, or about 5 parts of gluten per million, well below the World Health Organization's (WHO) 20 parts per million for classification as a gluten-free grain," according to Reuters.

    With gluten-free foods and beverages being of the world's fastest growing consumer trends, gluten-free barley could prove to be a very popular ingredient for making celiac-safe beers in the traditional European style.

    "A true gluten-free barley variety is a true game changer; there is going to be a massive market for the product," Phin Ziebell, an agribusiness economist at National Australia Bank, told Reuters.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    So what sort of ppm of gluten could one expect in beers based on this grain? This could be great if it's low enough.

    I suspect far less than 5ppm, and gluten can't be detected under 3ppm, so bring it on!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I've been drinking the beers from Glutenberg which are made from millet. They are quite good, way better than the awful sorghum based beers. They make an American Pale Ale, an IPA and a blonde ale. I'm very happy to have found a gluten-free beer that actually tastes like beer.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/09/2015 - The Germans are picky about their beer. They're picky about what goes into their beer. They're picky about what's even allowed to be called beer.
    They have been since 1487, when Albert IV, Duke of Bavaria enacted the Reinheitsgebot, which means literally "purity order," but if often called the "German Beer Purity Law" in English.
    The Reinheitsgebot...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/27/2015 - The results of the 2015 Great American Beer Festival are in and the big winner in the gluten-free category is Ghostfish Brewing of Seattle, which brought home the gold and the bronze in that category.
    Washington Breweries did very well overall, raking in 13 medals across all categories.
    The Gluten-Free Beer category had 24 submissions, with Ghostfish...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/08/2016 - A tiny new brewery, the 3,000-square-foot, totally gluten-free, Holidaily Brewing Company is now open in Golden, Colorado, home to beer industry giant Coors.
    Holidaily will brew all of its beers without barley or wheat, free from gluten and the component proteins that can adversely affect people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.
    Holidaily j...

  • Forum Discussions

    Have you had follow-up celiac disease testing?  You might want to rule out active celiac disease.  Celiacs can develop other autoimmune disorders or illnesses.  If your celiac disease is active, you might want to find the gluten source.  ...
    I was diagnosed celiac back in 2015 and have been on a gluten-free diet since. I never had major GI symptoms and I wouldn’t say I’m very in tune with my body so I wouldn’t notice if I felt worse after having a meal with gluten but overall I did...
    I hope this article can help.  It explains how gluten can affect us mentally whether or not we have Celiac Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809873/#!po=11.4458