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    Scott Adams

    Will Other Foods Affect the Villi? - by Kemp Randolph

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    The following is a March 11, 1998 post by Kemp Randolph krand@PIPELINE.COM.



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    According to Dr. Hugh Sampson, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, at an AMA sponsored press briefing on Nutrition, in a list of Facts vs. Fictions, Fiction: Skin tests or blood tests can be used to diagnose food sensitivities. Fact: ...A positive test does not mean a person will react to a food...furthermore these tests do not tell whether a person has a non-IgE mediated sensitivity to food.

    He describes these tests only as useful guides and points out that diet testing is the only reliable way to identify a food allergy, preferably where the person does not know whether they have eaten the suspect food.

    Q: If I am sensitive to milk and eggs...could they damage my villi in the same way as gluten?

    A: Theres a specific note in Michael Marshs book about food allergies causing villi damage. Thats the book On Coeliac Disease, page 155. Table there shows that the Type 3 stage of intestinal response, flat destructive does occur with milk, egg, soy and chicken or fish allergies. It differs from the celiac response in that only 1 or 3 of the 5 stages of lesion connected with celiac disease occur with an allergy.

    Whats unclear from this reference and from Medline searches Ive made is whether food allergies in adults cause villi damage. All the references I found were for children. Villi destruction does occur in children with milk allergy, but this like other pediatric allergies, apparently is usually outgrown.

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    Guest Patricia Benites Wright

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    My son had a serious case of celiac disease as a child, now he's over 40. They discovered that he is now allergic to sugar cane products.The article doesn't mention anything about such changes.

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    Guest Catherine Lasota

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    Thanks for the info... hope to see more good data...my family is in denial... as they are Italian. I know that Italians are predisposed to have celiac disease.

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    Interesting as I have been diagnosed with many food allergies and have been off wheat for years and felt great, had genetic testing for celiac which was negative, and just eliminated sugar cane from diet and I feel like a newer person than when I went off wheat!!

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    I was diagnosed 9 years ago and this was never something that I would have considered a problem. Thanks for this interesting information.

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    I had the blood test for celiac disease, which was negative but after having a capsule endoscopy it showed the villi were worn down in patches. I have had bowel problems for years, also anaemia and doctors have been unable to tell me what the problem is.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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