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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Would You Like Your Gluten-Free Food Printed, Sir?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise?


    Caption: Photo: CC--John Abella

    Celiac.com 12/11/2017 - With blazing progress in 3D printing technology, the future of numerous fields from house building to cake-making and, yes, cooking, is literally being written, or printed, before our very eyes.

    Food is definitely one of those arenas that will see major influence for 3d printing. In the future, more and more kitchens will come with one of more 3d printers that deliver highly customized food choices for chefs, on demand.

    Currently, platform for 3D printing personalized food are being developed for numerous applications, including gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and other specialized diet markets.

    In a talk presented at the 3D Printing and Beyond: Current and Future Trends conference at Hebrew university on October 25, Prof. Ido Braslavsky presented breakthrough 3D-printing innovations by Israeli and international experts from academia and industry. The conference was organized by the 3D & Functional Printing Center at the Hebrew University and Yissum, with the support of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and the Jerusalem Municipality.

    One breakthrough touted by Baslavsky was the ability to use 3D food printing to serve "numerous populations including the gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan markets, as well as the specialized diet market, for anyone from athletes to people with diabetes or celiac disease."

    In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to automatically prepare, mix, form and cook personalized food. Yaron Daniely, head of the university’s Yissum Research & Development technology-transfer company, called the technology nothing short of revolutionary.

    The self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food’s texture. The food products could then be cooked, baked, fried or grilled while being printed out in the three dimensional space.

    "The idea is to enable full control of the substances used, for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition, from the demand for personalized food … to addressing the problem of lack of food in developing countries," said Daniely.

    Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise? Stay tuned for more news on that front.

    Read more at: Israel21c.org


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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

    I think the idea of the article was that chefs might one day be able NOT to cross contaminate by using a new technology!

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    What I found repulsive in this story was the idea of "self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food's texture" - since going gluten-free following a celiac diagnosis, we eat far more fresh, non-processed foods - veg, fruits, nuts, meats - and have no desire to add nano-cellulose fibers to our diet.

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    This is really gross. Near the birthplace of wheat, barley and the most toxic grains, they are furthering the unhealthy assault of super-processed toxic “food†and “In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to†thoroughly cross-contaminate celiac patients.

    I think the article says the opposite of what you are concluding. I think the idea is that technology can help to create safe gluten-free options.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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