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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Would You Try a Vaccine for Celiac Disease?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Photo: CC--Frank Balsinger

    Celiac.com 08/26/2016 - News that ImmusanT company is beginning full human trials for their celiac disease vaccine, NexVax 2, brought a number of comments from our readers.

    We first reported on their effort way back in 2002, with our story, Australian Researchers Begin Work on a Vaccine for Celiac Disease.

    We followed up over the years, with stories in 2009, First Ever Celiac Disease Vaccine Trials Underway in Australia and again in 2011, with articles reporting on the company's efforts to raise investment funds, titled ImmusanT Raises $20 Million in Series A Financing to Advance Immunotherapeutic and Diagnostic for Celiac Disease and on how ImmusanT's Celiac Vaccine Passed Phase I Clinical Trials and in 2012, with Is a Vaccine for Celiac Disease Just Around the Corner?

    Comments generally ran toward the affirmative side, with many people expressing excitement or interest in such a vaccine.

    From Jared M: I hope this research goes well. The bread, crackers and pizza I can live without. But I would really like to be able to drink a good IPA again. The sorghum beers are horrible. I am quickly growing tired of ciders. I would definitely pay for this treatment if it works.

    From Toni: I have celiac. That [a vaccine] would be wonderful.

    From Traci: I would like to be involved in a study for this immunization.

    From Linda Haas: Can't wait to hear more about the progress made on this vaccine...it sounds very promising!

    From Donda: I'm thrilled with the possibility of this coming to market.

    From Muriel Weadick: This is what all celiacs have been waiting for, and I am sure I am not alone in wishing the company success.

    From Suzanne: A vaccine like this would make it easier to eat out and go on vacation.

    Jeanne Burge wrote: I would gladly volunteer for the trials in the US. Hope this works!

    Still, a few comments ran toward the less than glowing side, with some people expressing trepidation, or outright distrust toward such a vaccine.

    From Cathi: My Question is, "What will be the side effects of this turning off the body's ability to fight Gluten?" Will there still be destruction some place else and maybe worse? So, many times a pill is created to help one thing only to find out that it created another problem some place else in the body. Frankly, I am worried.

    From Donna: Absolutely agree with you, Cathi. There is always a problem and side effects with ANY drug! My question is this - WHAT ELSE will be shut off? Will we be even MORE susceptible to other illnesses? I am worried as well!

    From Balm: Thanks but no thanks. I'll remain a celiac and continue to eat healthy. While trying to fix one problem, some will end up with far worse problems.

    From Jonnys: Stupid idea! Just another way to make more money off of people.

    Certainly, those who may have a weakened or compromised immune system should consult with a physician before receiving most vaccines. But, in adults with a healthy immune system, such a vaccine would likely present little or no danger to the recipient. Most people with celiac disease have healthy immune systems, so the likelihood of any adverse reaction will be slight.

    Of course, this is all theoretical, even at this point, as vaccine trials have so far not proven how well the vaccine actually works in preventing or curing celiac disease.

    So, the question is, if such a vaccine is proven safe and effective, would you be open to trying it, or not?


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    Gee I would gladly try it. I wish I'd been in the trials, I'm so keen. I'd do just about anything at the thought of alleviating this rotten neuropathy and muscle /joint pain, extreme fatigue (9 months diagnosed celiac disease), so possibly still recovering /repairing.

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    Yep. If they get good results from the trials, I'll try it. Cross-contamination is getting to be an issue for me. Really don't want to live like a hermit and I do miss my beer.

    Since the vaccine has to be taken on an ongoing basis, you can always stop using it. The vaccine is establishing a tolerance to dietary gluten via the peptides -

     

    "It is specific for celiacs with the HLA-DQ2 haplotype, accounting for about 90% of celiac patients. Nexvax2 encompasses these three proprietary peptides, presenting them to T cells in the absence of a second, T-cell stimulatory signal. T cell recognition of the HLA-DQ2 bound toxic peptides thus occurs in a non-inflammatory environment, establishing tolerance to dietary gluten. This peptide based approach has been successful in generating tolerance in people with cat-sensitive asthma, and has not been used more broadly because it has been difficult to identify the correct toxic epitopes."

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    Yep. If they get good results from the trials, I'll try it. Cross-contamination is getting to be an issue for me. Really don't want to live like a hermit and I do miss my beer.

    Since the vaccine has to be taken on an ongoing basis, you can always stop using it. The vaccine is establishing a tolerance to dietary gluten via the peptides -

     

    "It is specific for celiacs with the HLA-DQ2 haplotype, accounting for about 90% of celiac patients. Nexvax2 encompasses these three proprietary peptides, presenting them to T cells in the absence of a second, T-cell stimulatory signal. T cell recognition of the HLA-DQ2 bound toxic peptides thus occurs in a non-inflammatory environment, establishing tolerance to dietary gluten. This peptide based approach has been successful in generating tolerance in people with cat-sensitive asthma, and has not been used more broadly because it has been difficult to identify the correct toxic epitopes."

    I have celiac disease and I am 13 years old... is there is any vaccine for celiac? If yes where did we can get it and how much is that?

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    Guest Jeffrey W. Adams

    Posted

    I agree what is wrong with going back to growing wheat and others that have not been genetically altered to produce MORE . Then we would not have this problem. I will not take the vaccine.

    Currently, commercial wheat is NOT genetically modified. All strains of commercial wheat currently available were created through standard hybridization techniques.

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    Guest Jeffrey W. Adams

    Posted

    I do not believe you have stated if this vaccine is for people with celiac disease or only to keep people without it from getting the disease?

    The vaccine is designed to inoculate people who currently have the disease, desensitizing them so that no adverse gluten reaction took place.

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    Guest Jeffrey W. Adams

    Posted

    No vaccines, period!

    Are you in favor of smallpox, diphtheria, polio, measles, and the myriad other diseases that have killed and crippled millions of people over the centuries? Should we just let those go unchecked?

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    Seeing as vaccines in general don't work....no. I wouldn't put this crap in my or my child's body.

    Vaccines "don't work?" Do you have any idea the number of people who no longer die from smallpox, diphtheria, polio, measles, and the myriad other diseases that have killed and crippled millions of people over the centuries? Vaccines do, in fact, "work." http://www.unicef.org/immunization/

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    Would love a cure for coeliac diease. I am one of those people who are very sensitive and even the smallest amount of gluten makes me violently ill. I wouldn't eat gluten full time though. Would be good to have options again and not get ill from that I eat and can enjoy traveling more without worry.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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