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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Yeast-free Pizza Crust (Gluten-Free)

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    ½ cup cornstarch
    ½ cup rice flour
    2/3 cup milk or milk substitution
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoons Italian spices
    Dash of garlic powder or salt

    Mix gently, do not over-beat. Pour batter into greased pizza pan. Bake at 425F for 20 minutes.

    For crispier crust, brush top with oil and bake five additional minutes. Add sauce and bake or freeze for future use.

    Option: Cook on top of stove in a small frying pan like a crepe. Use medium-low heat, cook until set, do not brown. Use a 6 pan for kids size.


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    I had no trouble refusing to eat the wheat based pizza that the rest of my family ate because of this great recipe. Myself & two of my younger boys suffer from wheat allergies, so I am so glad to find something we can feel good about eating. I substituted the milk for rice milk because my boy's also have dairy allergies and I accidentally added too much flour not realizing it was suppose to be liquidy. Even so, it turned out great! Thank you for sharing this recipe!

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    Having a family with multiple food allergies I found this recipe to be great tasting and easy to make. We have one problem however, the crust sticks like glue to the bottom of the pizza pan and I am looking for suggestions as to how I can avoid this. I have to use an egg substitute (flax seed and water) and was wondering if this had anything to do with it sticking? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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    I tried this gluten free pizza crust and it was fabulous. I had a hard time finding pizza crust recipes that were gluten free but I would give this one a 5 star .

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    My son also can't have corn. Is it possible to replace the cornstarch with potato starch or something else. I've been looking for a pizza recipe that he can eat for awhile. This one sounds great.

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    I replaced the flour and starch with 1 cup of Bob Mills gluten free flour mix and added 1 table spoon of oil to the batter as I like my pizza thin and crusty. I poured it out very thin on a cookie sheet and baked for 10 mins, added toppings and then another 10. Turned out PERFECT! I'm so excited finally finding a pizza crust that doesn't come out tasting like cardboard!!

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    Made this for a friend cuz I wanted to give her homemade pizza as a Christmas gift. She can't have corn, gluten, yeast or dairy so I substituted arrowroot for the cornstarch, unsweetened almond milk for the liquid and added a tablespoon of olive oil to the batter. It came out great especially compared to the commercial pizza crusts out there. I'm gluten intolerant myself so I've tried my fair share of them. After I cooked it, I took the crust out of the pan, put it on a wire cooling rack, added the toppings and put the rack/crust back in the oven so it would be crispy vs bready. The finishing touch was some fresh basil on top. Had some left over toppings so I whipped up a batch so I could taste the crust/pizza myself. I'm so impressed with how quickly it can be made as well as the flavor. Thank you!!

    Thanks for the substitutions, I have the EXACT allergies as your friend. What a great friend you are!

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    My son also can't have corn. Is it possible to replace the cornstarch with potato starch or something else. I've been looking for a pizza recipe that he can eat for awhile. This one sounds great.

    I use arrowroot starch since we cannot have corn either and it comes out great!

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    I was surprised to read pour batter rather than roll it. I haven't made it yet, but I will tomorrow. In the past, I have always had yeast on hand and rolled my gluten-free dough. I am thrilled to see I have all the ingredients in my house. If it wasn't so late at night, I would be making it rather than typing to you all. Thanks! You made me one happy celiac. I too hate cardboard pizza, so I am happy to see this has been tried by those gluten intolerant as myself!

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    I was doubtful as I poured this batter onto the sheet but it came out wonderful! I substituted egg whites because that's what I had on hand, topped with daiya cheese, mushrooms, green pepper and homemade chunky pizza sauce (onions, garlic, tomatoes, a little salt) - not in that order of course! It was absolutely excellent. Thanks so much!

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  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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