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    Jules Shepard

    Yeast-Free Sandwich Bread (Gluten-Free)

    Jules Shepard
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Afraid you can't bake good gluten-free yeast breads? Avoiding yeast in your diet? Looking for more whole grain nutrition? Whatever your reason, this recipe is your answer! Delicious, nutritious and sandwich-ready in under 1 hour!

    While this bread contains no yeast, it does contain the whole grain goodness of no less than six different gluten-free flours. Don't be put off by the unusually long list of ingredients – feel free to substitute with the flours you have on hand (be sure they're all certified gluten-free!), but look to whole grain gluten-free flours rather than starches for this bread.



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    Ingredients:
    1 cup Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour
    ½ cup buckwheat flour
    ¼ cup millet flour
    ¼ cup flaxseed meal
    ¼ cup gluten-free oats
    1/8 cup gluten-free oat flour
    1/8 cup teff
    1 teaspoon sea salt
    1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    3 eggs
    ¼ cup sparkling water or club soda
    2/3 cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or non-dairy)
    1 Tablespoon agave nectar or honey
    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
    ½ cup sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds/pepitas (optional)
    gluten-free oats, sesame seeds, sea salt or other toppings

    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350 F (static).

    Whisk together all dry ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.

    Beat the eggs until frothy, then add the remaining liquid ingredients and blend well. Slowly mix the dry ingredients into the liquids and stir until thoroughly incorporated. Mix in any seeds last.

    Scoop dough into an oiled, 9 x 5 inch metal loaf pan and sprinkle with any toppings of choice. Bake for 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, a nice crust has formed and the internal temperature is approximately 190 F.

    Remove to cool on a wire rack for 5-10 minutes, then remove to finish cooling before slicing.

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    Thank you for bringing bread back into my life!!! I no longer feel deprived. Jules, your all purpose flour is amazing.

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    I can"t wait to try this bread on my family. I'm not a big bread eater anyway, but my kids are. My 11 year old has asperger syndrome and I'm trying to cut things out of her diet a little at a time as to not shock her. Thank you for the recipe.

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    Looking for Yeast free due to allergy of bakers and brewers yeast. What are some options besides vinegar? It is made from yeast. Thanks!

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    Looking for Yeast free due to allergy of bakers and brewers yeast. What are some options besides vinegar? It is made from yeast. Thanks!

    @Angie: when you use organic apple vinegar there is no yeast added I believe. Then it is just the natural yeasting from the apples.

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    Wow very good. Were working at living healthier lives. I was nervous to try this bread, so glad I did it! This is good, taste good, easy to do...even my 3 year old likes it! Now to find yummy snacks!

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    I can't have potato starch, I am allergic to potato. Bummer I know! I really want to try this one, but can't do the all purpose mix you have posted. Any alternatives???

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    Do none of these cooks/chefs know that vinegar is yeast?

    "...Vinegars such as red wine vinegar, apple cider vinegar, and balsamic vinegar also do not contain gluten. They are not derived from a gluten grain, therefore they never had gluten to begin with."

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  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  


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