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  • Jefferson Adams

    Yes, Wine Flour is Real, and It's Gluten-Free

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      First, it is gluten-free. Those with sensitivity to gluten will be happy to know that all of the wine flour options are naturally gluten-free


    Image: CC--tribp
    Caption: Image: CC--tribp

    Celiac.com 01/18/2018 - Okay, so wine is good for lots of things, drinking notwithstanding. But try to wrap your head around this: wine flour.

    Yeah, flour made from wine grapes. There's no such thing you say? Well, wine flour is in fact a thing. The mashed post-crush grapes used to make top wines are indeed being milled into a unique flour.



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    Creator Hillary Niver-Johnson calls her product Finger Lakes Wine Flour. Her wine flour is made from the the pomace, or grape skins and seeds, are typically discarded in the wine making process. Niver-Johnson and her team of three collect the from local wineries in the Finger Lakes of New York. They then sort, separate, sun-dry, and mill the pomace in Hector, New York.

    But, why buy wine flour?

    First, it is gluten-free. Those with sensitivity to gluten will be happy to know that all of the wine flour options are naturally gluten-free.

    Second, it's nutritious. Wine flour has all the same vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants as grapes. Wine flour is also rich in protein and fiber, with two grams of protein and three grams of fiber in every teaspoon.

    It comes in varietals to match you taste. Wine flour is available as Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Gewurztraminer.

    It's a great supplemental flour for enriching most any recipe with its nutrients, flavor, and of course, that wine tint. Use wine flour as a supplement to regular flour to make your favorite foods.

    Read more at brit.co.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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