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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Zakkokumai Gluten-free Multigrain Rice Blend

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    02/19/2015 - The Japanese make a dish called Zakkokumai, which is cooked Japanese rice and millet. Zakkoku just means “mixed grains”, and mai is rice. Commercial Japanese dry mixes often use barley, so it’s best to make your own. I’ve modified that a bit by adding quinoa to the bunch.

    Photo: CC--Makoko OtsukaIf you’re eating gluten-free because of celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, chances are you’re not getting enough fiber, or vitamins. If you’re like me, you may eat a lot of rice.

    One easy way to get a wider grain profile, and more nutrition, into your diet is to add gluten-free grains to standard brown, white or mixed rice.

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup brown rice
    • 1 cup white rice
    • ¼ cup quinoa
    • ¼ cup millet
    • 5 cups water

    Directions:
    Rinse rice and grains in clean water.

    Place in pot with water and bring to a boil.

    Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until tender to taste, about 40 minutes.

    Other options include buckwheat, flax seed, sesame seed, poppy seed, black rice, wild rice, gluten-free oats, or any other gluten-free grain. Adjust cooking time and wage levels as needed.


    User Feedback

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    I like the advice, and, for me, it's a great way to get millet into my diet, by hiding it among other grains. I know it's supposed to be good for me, but, I hate it. To be fair, I think that's because the first time I had it, it was stale.

     

    The reason I am not giving a better rating to this article is that I didn't like the ending. It seemed like someone wanted to quickly finish it up and call it good, when there was a lot more information that needed to be given.

     

    Yes, we could substitute those other grains and seeds for the ones mentioned in the recipe, and, adjust the cooking time and wage (???) levels as needed, but, when we are talking about mixing grains that have different cooking times and water (wage) needs, how do we know what is needed?

     

    Do we just automatically mix them all in and cook them by the time needed for the one that generally takes the longest, thereby ending up with a weird grain pudding? Is that the point? Or, would it be better to add the proper amount of water for each one and then add them in, one at a time, in time for them to cook just the proper amount? And, if we did the latter, how much time needs to be added to make up for the fact that the grains were not all in during the "bringing to a boil" of the water?

     

    I'm all fine with weird pudding, by the way. However, I do know that flax seeds need to have some care taken and that people have killed themselves by cooking them wrong. I mean, you cook flax seeds wrong, you get paint brush cleaner! It's toxic. So ... I know there has to be some difference between cooking a mix with flax seed and cooking a mix with millet.

     

    I was hoping you'd go into that, more.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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